Main definitions of chase in English

: chase1chase2chase3chase4

chase1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Pursue in order to catch or catch up with.

    ‘police chased the stolen car through the city’
    [no object] ‘the dog chased after the stick’
    • ‘The robbers hijacked a passing car but were chased and eventually caught.’
    • ‘Police arrived and the group fled across fields but were caught when police chased them using a helicopter.’
    • ‘If the police were chasing the grey car, it was highly irresponsible, what with it being rush hour.’
    • ‘Police chased after him and one officer was hurt as they brought him to the ground, added Mr King.’
    • ‘A one point Michael and Rachel are being chased by a police car whose flashing lights get knocked off.’
    • ‘I got on my bike, called the police to report a kidnapping then chased after the car.’
    • ‘I chased after him and caught up with him looking in a shop window.’
    • ‘Two of them escaped on foot but a third was chased and caught by staff.’
    • ‘The two police cars that were chasing the car hit the gas tank.’
    • ‘The two men then ran off, but Canulta was chased and caught.’
    • ‘The five left, kept running up the spiral way, while some police chased after them.’
    • ‘Armed police chased the youngster and the lookout across gardens before catching them.’
    • ‘The first and only time I tried to do it outside I got caught and chased by a guy with a shot gun.’
    • ‘She chased after her, catching her by the back of her skirt and pulling her to a halt on the second stair.’
    • ‘I chased after her and caught her left arm with my free hand, forcing her to stop.’
    • ‘Ohio State Police chased after a stolen BMW at speeds of up to 130 miles an hour.’
    • ‘Their new ally wanted to make sure that they wouldn't be chased after.’
    • ‘He eventually abandoned the vehicle and ran off, chased by the police officer, who caught him when he fell over.’
    • ‘He refused of course and the police chased after him.’
    • ‘She eventually managed to break free and run home to her grandmother, who called the police. The man was later chased and caught by the girl's father.’
    pursue, run after, follow, hunt, track, trail
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Seek to attain.
      ‘the team are chasing their first home win this season’
      • ‘Performance is the only criterion by which a team chasing greatness can judge itself.’
      • ‘If we aren't interested in changing the way the country works, but only in chasing after an ebbing political tide, then we will earn nothing but ridicule.’
      • ‘But it was not an easy track to victory, with 13 other teams chasing the big prize.’
      • ‘Jones named an unchanged team to chase Australia's first series win in three years.’
      • ‘And people who spend their lives always chasing after pleasure have a good chance of attaining it.’
      • ‘But that was far from the end of the action, with both teams chasing another goal as though their life depended on it.’
      • ‘No contest, really; and after doing some hard financial sums, I left the day job to chase a few dreams.’
      • ‘The graduates are among thousands of others chasing the same jobs each year to repay the spiralling costs of higher education.’
      • ‘Hundreds of thousands of people of working age have also moved to the coast to chase the new jobs, although this has led to high levels of unemployment in many areas.’
      • ‘We have found it harder to chase results compared to teams who have been put together over a long period of time.’
      • ‘Unless you make a horrible screw-up, by and large you aren't chasing business day and night.’
      • ‘It's a contest where players' reputations will either be enhanced or tarnished as two strong teams chase glory.’
      • ‘I decide in that moment to quit my job and to chase adventure full-time.’
      • ‘Some highlights from the research shows that those firms looking beyond Dublin to get out of the traffic jams may not fare any better by chasing the rural idyll.’
      • ‘He's been networking - chasing jobs and setting up lunches and talking about the golf he's been playing on the days he's not here.’
      • ‘Opposition parties may chase votes by dividing communities for their own political ends.’
      • ‘Revenues have nearly doubled to £49 million but losses have increased from £20 million to £37 million as it chases new customers.’
      • ‘The composure we saw against Italy at Hampden and against Norway in Oslo had gone, blown away by a visiting team chasing a cause.’
      • ‘A radical change appears to be taking place in the workplace with employees chasing their dreams and seeking greater fulfilment.’
    2. 1.2Seek the company of (a member of the opposite sex) in an obvious way.
      ‘he spends all his free time chasing girls’
      • ‘Agatha was a famous beauty from a noble family, who was chased after by the villainous senator.’
      • ‘I decided that I would no longer chase women like other guys my age.’
      • ‘‘They should be out drinking or chasing the opposite sex, but they are here getting stuck in,’ says Naughton.’
      • ‘Ed, Rick and Benett in particular are sad cases and spend most of their time chasing members of the opposite sex.’
      • ‘I had always known that my husband wasn't one to chase women.’
      • ‘"I don't golf, I don't fish, I'm too old to chase women," he said.’
  • 2 Drive or cause to go in a specified direction.

    ‘she chased him out of the house’
    • ‘I paused, letting it chase some of the night chill from my bones.’
    • ‘Red tape chases companies overseas, out of Europe.’
    • ‘He said they were then chased out of the cemetery.’
    • ‘No one was injured during either robbery, the first of which saw the suspect being chased out of the shop empty-handed.’
    • ‘He recounted that family, friends and relatives all chased him away and he has had no further contact with them.’
    • ‘The health care ‘reforms’ of the past seven years have chased tens of thousands of nurses and other health care workers out of the field.’
    • ‘The occupant chased Akulukjuk out of the house.’
    • ‘It didn't seem to matter how many times I chased her out of the room with a rolled up newspaper every time she mentioned it, she just kept rabbiting on about it.’
    • ‘The birds were docile on the drive, so the TV people chased them across the road to get some shots of them crossing, being careful to stay out of shot themselves.’
    • ‘Peron was finally chased out of the country in 1955.’
    • ‘If a shopkeeper chases pollsters out of his store at the mention of pedestrianization, do you mark him as ‘undecided’?’
    • ‘But they were ready to claim as many as 28 to 30 seats based upon a slogan of chasing the government loyalists out of office.’
    • ‘He's been chased out of the U.S., Great Britain and Canada, but seems to think his adopted homeland, Australia, is a safe haven.’
    • ‘There are neighbourhoods where they are chased out of.’
    • ‘Every time it ends up being even more of an ordeal than the previous time and I am really sick and tired of them to the point where I just feel like picking up a stick and chasing all of them out of my life.’
    • ‘The important thing is we do not chase jobs away from California.’
    • ‘They then chased the members into the courthouse yard.’
    • ‘Of course, the university didn't condone his actions, but nobody contacted any authorities to chase him off campus.’
    • ‘Skateboarders were chased out of local schools and parks.’
    drive away, drive off, drive out, put to flight, send away, scare off, scatter
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1[no object, with adverbial of direction]Rush in a specified direction.
      ‘he chased down the motorway’
      • ‘Gone were the rucksacked school kids, chattering and chasing around the old ladies who hobbled along almost in slow motion with yappy dogs and hair in a bun and little trolleys full of bread.’
      • ‘I'd chase along the street nearest the river, dodging out side streets to the riverbank.’
      • ‘We managed to get our group together and chased along the route.’
  • 3Try to obtain (something owed or required)

    ‘the company employs people to chase up debts’
    • ‘This has helped fuel unsustainable levels of borrowing, which has led to a record £5 billion worth of debt being chased by debt collectors.’
    • ‘You may have to chase up debts due to you from your customers/clients.’
    • ‘Parish council chairman Kate Brown said: ‘It is of great concern that you have to keep chasing up answers.’’
    • ‘Behind the scenes, however, things could be looking up for Cowling after Councillor John Alderson got onto the district council this week to chase up the matter.’
    • ‘Creditors fall foul of the law if they chase up debts too frequently.’
    • ‘Eventually, they recruited more staff to chase up debts and things improved.’
    pester, harass, harry, nag, plague, hound
    seek out, find, go after, follow up
    hassle
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1Try to make contact with (someone) in order to obtain something owed or required.
      ‘the council recently appointed its own team of bailiffs to chase non-payers’
      • ‘It was the media's decision to chase people down with cameras at home to try and get them or their families on tape.’
      • ‘The woman found herself being chased by creditors after the Salvation Army member left the home he once shared with her in Walcot.’
      • ‘Do you ever have those days where it feels like all you're doing is nagging and chasing people up in order to get them to do the stuff they'd actually promised to do already?’
      • ‘There is talk of the Revenue chasing these people down.’
      • ‘While the number of people on the roll went up, and in parts of New Zealand, people were chasing citizens around the streets to try to get them enrolled, it did not result in more people voting.’
      • ‘In February 2000 the Council of Mortgage lenders announced that its members had agreed voluntarily not to chase someone for a debt if they have not been contacted within six years.’
      • ‘When I forgot to inform the necessary people, they chased me down for the information.’
      • ‘I spend a lot of time chasing people for information, and it hurts, I tell you.’
      • ‘But then I feel like I'm chasing people up more and more to be able to do this.’
      • ‘Many lenders are heavy users of the courts in chasing customers who have defaulted on mortgage repayments.’
      • ‘He agreed that it would be good practice to chase people up after two weeks or so in case they had forgotten.’
      • ‘But are you saying that you often have to chase people when they're well past the due date?’
      • ‘A debt-collection agency hired by the phone company to chase customers with overdue bills has been accused of using heavy handed techniques to recover money.’
      • ‘I even chased people up to make sure they had sent their slips off.’
      • ‘We cannot be reduced to chasing people around who claim to speak for the party.’
      • ‘Scarborough Council recently appointed its own team of bailiffs to chase non-payers amid growing concern about a hard core of residents who are flouting the law.’
      • ‘It makes sense from a lender's point of view as it can chase two people for the full amount rather than one.’
      • ‘She did not have the wherewithal to chase those people down, and, even if she did, she was unlikely to get recompense from them.’
      • ‘A very useful and very welcome distraction from people chasing me for money.’
    2. 3.2Make further investigation of an unresolved matter.
      • ‘Curran chased down stories for the West Coast alternative press when the alternative press was young.’
      • ‘Or if I do, I should be doing it in the right places - chasing up all those ideas swirling around in my mind that I haven't quite managed to get down in text form yet.’
      • ‘I'm here chasing up leads in the journalistic and human rights worlds, trying to get information on modern slavery.’
      • ‘He sought to chase the matter up in various ways, in particular by telephone calls to Sir David on about 18 June and to Mr Barnes on 23 June.’
      • ‘There's a chunk missing from March to November that we still have to chase down.’
      • ‘We just decided to chase down the story and see if we could find out more about it.’
      • ‘I completely neglected all the telesales leads I had been chasing up.’
      • ‘However, such shortcomings are easy to overlook given the ambitious nature of Saco's project and the relentlesness with which she chases down challenging critical concepts.’
      • ‘While the police chase down leads, Reichs gathers her own evidence.’
      • ‘Our chief news correspondent, Charlie Word, joins us from Dunnes Stores, where he has been chasing up on the story.’
      • ‘They're only saying that they are chasing up new leads at the moment.’
      • ‘At the same time, when we were chasing down the pardon story that we ran, we didn't come across any other news organization out there beating the same trail.’
      • ‘If you want to know what it is do your own research, I can't be bothered chasing down a link.’
      • ‘I have been chasing up what Marx says about circulation and distribution in his works.’
      • ‘He really has been in the forefront of helping us, chasing down leads, looking for terrorists.’
      • ‘He had picked up a rumour that someone had cracked it, and would spend all night chasing it up, unless he could find something more interesting.’
      • ‘The investigator is now chasing up leads back in the UK.’
      • ‘If my passion for finding the truth, if my enthusiasm for chasing up lines of enquiry came across to some people as giving an appearance of bias or pre-judgement then I regret that.’
      • ‘But what happens when you try to chase down the source of the claim?’

noun

  • 1An act of pursuing someone or something.

    ‘they captured the youths after a brief chase’
    • ‘A police van called to the house spotted a BMW and the stolen Mercedes heading in the opposite direction but the car got away after a brief chase.’
    • ‘The men forced one innocent motorist to write off his car during the chase through Kildare, the Curragh, New-bridge, Naas and Kilcullen.’
    • ‘From car and snowmobile chases to walking on the ceiling with modified shoes and infiltrating hidden laboratories, Cody has to use all his training to save the world - and maybe get the girl.’
    • ‘Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has indicated Malaysia might lodge a diplomatic protest over the boat chase.’
    • ‘He admitted giving the drugs to his girlfriend, a passenger in the car, which had been thrown out of the window during the chase.’
    • ‘A car chase in L.A. ends in an arrest, but not before a highway patrol officer missed a hard right turn and crashed through a building.’
    • ‘The job the crew carries out is the audacious theft of a mafia safe full of gold they just about get away with, after a fairly thrilling chase through the canals of Venice.’
    • ‘A chase ensued; eventually the terrorists abandoned their car and ambushed a bus, taking 9 prisoners.’
    • ‘Thus followed a very hectic chase through the woods.’
    • ‘Police in Richardson, Texas, released incredible pictures today of a car chase and gun battle with three suspected bank robbers.’
    • ‘The acting inspector said he was confident the chase followed correct police procedure.’
    • ‘Police believe witnesses who saw the car either before the chase, during the pursuit or afterwards could have very important information.’
    • ‘A former driving instructor led police on a 17-minute chase at up to 120 mph in a powerful BMW sports car, a court heard.’
    • ‘Three days later police launched a second full-scale search for a suspected disqualified driver, resulting in a car chase through Trowbridge town centre.’
    • ‘My mother is just happy that I'm on television and not in a car chase.’
    • ‘The chase ended in just a few blocks, with the men crashing their car.’
    • ‘The film begins quite promisingly, with a violent ambush on the gold shipment and a thrilling stagecoach chase.’
    • ‘A North Yorkshire Police spokesman said six local youths, all under 18, were arrested following the chase.’
    • ‘Two suspects who had fled the stolen car involved in the chase escaped and were being sought in a house-to-house search.’
    • ‘It's a truly inventive one-man show, that combines physical theatre, comedy, original music and even a car chase.’
    pursuit, hunt, trail
    hunting, coursing, course
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1
      short for steeplechase
      • ‘Extra races are being proposed for the meeting, currently run over three days from Tuesday to Thursday, including a cross-country chase.’
      • ‘The whole thinking, however, betrays an extraordinary bias, on the subject of the perceived champions, towards competitors in chases of three miles or more.’
      • ‘However, Cheltenham's two major chases, the Gold Cup and the Queen Mother Champion Chase, have been more elusive and the Festival has not always been a happy hunting ground for Pipe.’
      • ‘A chase involves larger, rigid fences while a hurdle race is run over shorter, more flexible obstacles.’
      • ‘Racing will commence at 4.30 and the mixed card will consist of three flat races, three chases and a bumper for five, six and seven year olds.’
      • ‘Racing begins at 3.05 and the mixed card consists of four flat events, including two six furlong races, two chases and two hurdles.’
      • ‘The Dumfriesshire Hunt has also been used by keen amateur riders who can qualify their mounts for fox hunter chases at official race tracks as well as point to point amateur races.’
      • ‘A brave competitor, he is known for his staying power in handicap chases.’
      • ‘But Victor and his team kept faith and the old horse has won some top class handicap chases in recent months.’
      • ‘Inside you'll find details on all the races and the points-race chase, plus lots of great photos.’
      • ‘Apparently the horse jumped particularly well and his trainer expects him to make a big impression in novice chases.’
      • ‘Among the highlights of the season have been joining the elite club of jockeys to ride a winner at every jumps track in the country, and the ride he gave Kingscliff in a handicap chase at Ascot in November.’
      • ‘Having been unextended in a novice chase at Uttoxeter last November he did not return to the track again until Chepstow in April, where he again won well.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the ride he gave Kingscliff in a handicap chase at Ascot was voted the jumps ride of the year by his weighing room colleagues.’
      • ‘It was a fine piece of training by Henry and also said much about the horse's liking for the course, where he had won a valuable chase two years earlier.’
      • ‘He ended last season by winning the Scottish Champion Hurdle, then injured himself in his first novice chase.’
      • ‘The champion trainer was nervous before the novice chase at Naas, but he needn't have worried as his young hopeful romped home.’
      • ‘Having won his first two novice chases, he was made favourite on his handicap debut at Ayr, but again Dobbin was left in the doldrums.’
      • ‘He reminded spectators that hunts were also the backbone of point-to-point race meetings, team chases and a range of social events, as well as the Pony Club - the biggest youth club in the country.’
      • ‘Friday's Sandown card will be all steeplechases, combining three chases from tomorrow's abandoned card and the three from the planned Friday schedule.’
    2. 1.2Hunting as a sport.
      ‘she was an ardent follower of the chase’
      • ‘It is impossible to know for certain to what extent hunted animals suffer during the chase and the kill.’
      • ‘The association of the chase of the hunt and the chase of sex is an anthropological commonplace.’
      • ‘American collectors may link acquiring art with social status, but there is also the real joy of the chase.’
      • ‘The Emperor, who was preparing for the chase, escaped being made a prisoner by hardly an hour.’
      • ‘The thrill of the chase is secondary because of the need to keep the fox population down.’
      • ‘The others left the chase at various points after that.’
      • ‘Hunting with hounds is totally different: animals are hunted for sport and the ritualised chase is designed to be as long as possible.’
      • ‘It seems that few kings had much time for the thrills of the chase and, in most cases, the hunting was done by professionals to provide meat for feasts and as gifts.’
      • ‘This whole area used to be Henry VIII's hunting chase, a protected patch of lush woodland to the north of the capital.’
      • ‘The spirits of the men was much lifted by the hunt, for they enjoyed the chase, and it was great sport for all of them.’
      • ‘Some are out for the pleasure of the chase, some for a good ride and others to protect their legitimate interests in their property.’
      • ‘But the fire of the chase was in me; and I resolved to hunt down the highwaymen, for only a quarter hour had passed since they had gone.’
      • ‘The thrill of the chase only compounded her problems.’
      • ‘She lived for danger, the chase, the thrill of it all.’
      • ‘The thrill of the sport lies in the chase and the hounds tracking the fox.’
      • ‘And I couldn't help but feel the thrill of a different kind of chase.’
      • ‘It is a visible quarry, so foot followers can still be involved and enjoy the chase.’
      • ‘I suspect the chase is the part they enjoy, as some skill is required riding a horse over rough terrain.’
      • ‘As with every seduction, however, the excitement of the chase soon is replaced by discontent and even misery.’
      • ‘Thrilling to the chase, I pounded down the uneven corridor until the beam of my light fell upon a wooden door at the end of the passage.’
    3. 1.3British [in place names]An area of unenclosed land formerly reserved for hunting.
      ‘Cannock Chase’
      • ‘Cannock Chase is home to large populations of nocturnal animals, therefore we ask that you enjoy the forest during daylight hours only and allow the wildlife to recuperate without disturbance.’
      • ‘Cannock Chase has rolling hills, heathers, quiet forests and wild fallow deer.’
    4. 1.4archaic A hunted animal.

Phrases

  • chase the game

    • (in soccer) adopt attacking tactics, especially when losing, at the risk of being vulnerable to counter-attack.

      ‘we made the mistake of trying to chase the game instead of playing it tight’
      • ‘Without their experience we lost our shape and decided to chase the game.’
      • ‘Robinson was unusually nervy in the second half, as England chased the game, leaving space at the back.’
      • ‘Throwing off the restraint they had shown, Germany now had to chase the game and reverted to the high-tempo style Klinsmann has introduced.’
      • ‘We tried to chase the game earlier than we should have done.’
      • ‘It left us chasing the game when we had worked so hard to get level.’
      • ‘I didn't want us to be chasing the game and I'm pleased we kept doing the things which had paid off for us in the first half.’
      • ‘We gave a bad goal away minutes before half-time and ended up chasing the game in the second half.’
      • ‘With the home team then obliged to chase the game, their defence would have been even more vulnerable.’
      • ‘It would be as well, however, if Eriksson's players do not lapse back into their bad habits of the qualifiers and find themselves having to chase the game against Denmark after conceding a goal.’
      • ‘Croatia can feel aggrieved by the half-time scoreline, but you sense it will be difficult for them to change their approach in the second half if they have to start chasing the game.’
  • chase shadows

    • Pursue illusory targets.

      ‘I found that the three-day mission did little more than chase shadows’
      • ‘The Germans were literally chasing shadows in the night.’
      • ‘Monaco's players are just stroking the ball around for fun now, with the Chelsea players reduced to chasing shadows.’
      • ‘The faux war in Afghanistan, where some 12,000 US troops are chasing shadows, is costing $5 billion each month.’
      • ‘Many others would have driven themselves mad chasing shadows for 12 fruitless rounds.’
      • ‘Of course, whether you've spotted anything or are just chasing shadows is what makes the pursuit all the more entertaining.’
      • ‘Some of the one-touch football in the latter stages of the first half left Rotherham chasing shadows.’
      • ‘That is frustrating for the police, who waste so much time chasing shadows, and distressing for residents left feeling helpless.’
      • ‘Ben Black followed up with a neat move to step through the Cougar defence which was left chasing shadows for another converted try.’
      • ‘Kerry were chasing shadows as Cork dominated in every area.’
      • ‘No doubt he'd heard the rumors that she was chasing shadows and had hoped to avoid this conversation.’
  • give chase

    • Go in pursuit.

      ‘a patrol car gave chase and finally overtook him’
      ‘officers gave chase to one of the thieves’
      • ‘As they were taking our details, word came through that it had been spotted by an eagle-eyed policeman 5 minutes away, and more police cars were now giving chase.’
      • ‘Soon, dozens of Beijing police vehicles were giving chase.’
      • ‘He kept pointing the gun at us but we kept giving chase.’
      • ‘A Police Car gives chase and manages to force her car to the side of the road.’
      • ‘When the van refused to stop, police gave chase and the four men were shot during the pursuit.’
      • ‘The officers gave chase and finally caught up with the suspect vehicle as it came to a standstill in heavy city traffic.’
      • ‘He saw about 20 police officers, some of them armed, rushing into the station before a man jumped over the barriers with police giving chase.’
      • ‘Despite giving chase, the gang got away in a Land Rover bearing false plates and was never traced.’
      • ‘Police gave chase, finally forcing the driver to pull off the road.’
      • ‘Catching sight of the killer, he gives chase, and in one of the film's best scenes is captured huffing and puffing through night-time Los Angeles in hot pursuit of the younger suspect.’
      chase, pursue, run after, follow, hunt, track, trail
      be hot on someone's heels
      tail
      View synonyms
  • go and chase oneself

    • informal [in imperative]Go away.

      • ‘Go and chase yourself away from this house!’
      • ‘You'd better go and chase yourself round the square a few times.’
  • the thrill of the chase

    • Pleasure and excitement derived from seeking something desired, especially a sexual partner.

      ‘I was so lost in the thrill of the chase that I didn't realize we were entirely incompatible’
      • ‘Sportsmen, seeking the thrill of the chase, released rabbits, hares and foxes.’
      • ‘Women want to revisit the passion and lust of a new physical relationship and enjoy the thrill of the chase.’
      • ‘And no matter how much single people claim they want to live on their own (and fair enough if the only alternative is picking up the dirty pants of your sexually-hibernating cocoa partner) everyone loves the thrill of the chase.’
      • ‘Like the Antiques Roadshow, Reclaimers justifies itself as part bargain hunt - with all the thrill of the chase - and part history lesson.’
      • ‘They enjoy the pageantry, the horsemanship and the countryside. They relish the thrill of the chase, but stress that they derive pleasure from hunting, not killing.’
      • ‘I think he enjoyed being successful and loved the thrill of the chase in business.’
      • ‘I've even heard them argue that the foxes actually, you know, quite like it, the thrill of the chase - until they're ripped to pieces.’
      • ‘India enjoy the thrill of the chase as chastened England head home’
      • ‘There's not what you could call a plethora of foxes round here, but you still have the thrill of the chase.’
      • ‘This way you could enjoy the thrill of the chase without the expense of owning a horse.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French chacier (verb), chace (noun), based on Latin captare continue to take, from capere take.

Pronunciation:

chase

/tʃeɪs/

Main definitions of chase in English

: chase1chase2chase3chase4

chase2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Engrave (metal, or a design on metal)

    ‘a miniature container with a delicately chased floral design’
    • ‘Another designed, cast, and possibly chased the feet, handle, and applied decoration.’
    • ‘A case in point is the repoussé and chased outer watchcase of the pair-case watch.’
    • ‘After casting, the best plaquettes were usually chiselled and chased, and either finished with a patina or gilt.’
    • ‘Both feature elaborately chased gold scrolls enhanced with enamel framing the painted enamel reserves.’
    • ‘The swirling movement of the dense repoussé and chased decoration and the sinuous spout and handle are in perfect balance.’
    • ‘This is a gorgeous Victorian solid sterling silver vesta case with beautiful hand chased decoration and initialled cartouche.’
    • ‘Although the cast feet and applied rim ornament are in an ornate rococo revival style, the details are not chased.’
    • ‘The gold foil is chased from the inside with details incised on the exterior.’
    • ‘The gold mounting is decorated with pearling and designed in a spiral pattern that has been heavily chased to give the effect of octopus tentacles.’
    • ‘The bowl features ornate floral chased decoration.’
    • ‘I'm not going to waste my time chasing that particular brass ring any longer.’
    • ‘A third of all Roman brooches found in Britain have some applied decoration, and most of the rest have relief decoration that is cast in, chased, punched or engraved.’
    engrave, etch, carve, inscribe, cut, chisel, imprint, impress, print, mark
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: apparently from earlier enchase, from Old French enchasser.

Pronunciation:

chase

/tʃeɪs/

Main definitions of chase in English

: chase1chase2chase3chase4

chase3

noun

  • (in letterpress printing) a metal frame for holding the composed type and blocks being printed at one time.

    • ‘The types are set up in a metal chase, which is fitted with a handle and can be used as a stamp.’
    • ‘On to a perfectly level tabletop known as ‘the stone,’ he dropped a heavy metal chase.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French châsse, from Latin capsa box (see case).

Pronunciation:

chase

/tʃeɪs/

Main definitions of chase in English

: chase1chase2chase3chase4

chase4

noun

  • 1The part of a gun enclosing the bore.

    • ‘Earlier models often had a molding, or at least a sharp discontinuity, between the reinforce and chase.’
    • ‘Since powder pressure was greatest toward the breech, this part of the gun tube was thicker than the chase.’
  • 2A groove or furrow cut in the face of a wall or other surface to receive a pipe or wire.

    • ‘Under-cabinet hoods mount to the bottom of a wall cabinet through which ductwork can route to the outside via an adjoining wall, chase, soffit, or ceiling.’
    • ‘Common chases - spaces for piping, ductwork and wiring - also must be designed to distribute the utility supply to tenant areas.’
    • ‘Next, all new air-conditioning ducts had to be installed in the original wall chases.’
    • ‘You need to be able to drill down into the wall chase at the exact spot above your proposed "hole-in-the-wall."’
    • ‘For example, photos of a pipe chase can be placed in the model with information tags to identify each pipe and duct.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from French chas enclosed space, from Provençal cas, caus, from medieval Latin capsum thorax or nave of a church.

Pronunciation:

chase

/tʃeɪs/