Definition of charter in English:

charter

noun

  • 1A written grant by the sovereign or legislative power of a country, by which a body such as a borough, company, or university is created or its rights and privileges defined.

    ‘the town received a charter from the Emperor’
    • ‘King Henry III is said to have granted a market charter to the town in 1227.’
    • ‘The charter created the town's first link with the textile industry as it allowed fullers - who cleansed and thickened cloth by washing and beating it - to ply their trade in Bolton.’
    • ‘In 1794 the legislature granted the charter, creating one of the four earliest academies in New Hampshire.’
    • ‘It's now been put back in the charter, and that legislation is going through parliament at the moment.’
    • ‘Unlike physical citizens, who inherently possessed certain rights, all corporate privileges came from the charters that created them.’
    • ‘The merchant guilds they formed controlled markets, weights and measures, and tolls, and negotiated charters granting their towns borough status.’
    • ‘William the Conqueror granted London a charter, confirming its previous privileges, but also began building the White Tower, nucleus of the Tower of London, as a strong point.’
    • ‘In some places, though, a town charter must be granted by vote of the state legislature.’
    • ‘Many borough charters enhanced the privileges of communities now resident at long-established trading centres, including of course royal burghs of the Anglo-Saxon period.’
    • ‘The club was granted a charter in 1926 and by May 1932 sufficient funds had been raised to build a club hall in Kimberley Road on ground granted by the municipality.’
    • ‘They were convinced that its clauses reaffirmed such longstanding rights of the English people as trial by jury and the right of habeas corpus, thought to be derived from law-codes and royal charters predating John's grant.’
    • ‘It is the 800th anniversary of King John granting the charters that effectively created Marlborough and the townsfolk intend to party in style.’
    • ‘It is a pity that it is not 1976, because we could then make a big thing about it being the 300th anniversary of being granted a charter to be a market town.’
    • ‘As might be expected, the legislative granting of corporate charters generated a great deal of populist hand-wringing about equality of opportunity.’
    • ‘Each of these organizations is a juridical body, the legal capacity of which is confined by its respective mandate as defined in its charter.’
    • ‘The 18 states where other institutions, such as universities and local governments, can grant charters have an average of 96 schools.’
    • ‘Some of them had legislative charters, others did not, and still others operated in violation of the law.’
    • ‘In September 1920 the state of Illinois granted a charter and authorized the awarding of diplomas, degrees and teaching certificates.’
    • ‘In 1662, the Society was granted its charter by Charles II.’
    • ‘Those nations currently devising statutory charters and legislative oversight of their foreign intelligence services might do well to include an independent judiciary in their blueprints.’
    permit, licence, warrant, warranty, deed, bond, document, indenture
    authority, authorization, sanction, covenant, dispensation, consent, permission, sufferance
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A written constitution or description of an organization's functions.
      ‘the impending review of the BBC's Charter’
      • ‘If two-thirds of voters in any three provinces reject the charter in the referendum, the constitution will be defeated.’
      • ‘The charter puts in place self-imposed rules by which the organisers will run rehabilitation courses at the centre.’
      • ‘On the other hand the countries of the South cling to the organisation and its charter.’
      • ‘While the charter served a treaty-like function during the baronial wars, its reissue in time of peace established it as a basis of government.’
      • ‘The U.S. State Department says they'll wait to see a full draft of the constitutional charter before responding.’
      • ‘First of all, we establish a charter under which the organisation operates.’
      • ‘Increasing resentment of the lack of economic progress forced him gradually to introduce civilian rule, which was confirmed by a referendum on a constitutional charter in 1987.’
      • ‘Each campus organization begins with a charter, which is a document that explains the organization's mission and the various guidelines they will be run by.’
      • ‘But what is also clear is that there is a charter, and the organisation will be held accountable for its implementation.’
      • ‘The charter will remain in effect until a permanent constitution is drafted and ratified next year.’
      • ‘The members hope to adopt an organisational charter and a theological platform for the group based on a strict reading of the Scriptures.’
      • ‘For another, it is obvious that much of the protestation is just token outrage, going through the motions to validate the charter of certain organisations.’
      • ‘The lectures alternate with the reading and interpretation of selected charters and constitutional documents.’
      • ‘All over Europe the basic patterns were established in all the early medieval kingdoms in terms both of the functions of the charters and of the social organization supporting their production and use in the localities.’
      • ‘This includes amendments to the charter of the Arab organisation that should facilitate the rules of voting and decision-making.’
      • ‘It has a charter to which participating organisations must adhere.’
      • ‘They see proposals for a constitutional charter of rights as a frontal attack on their very notion of the rule of law and of the legitimate judicial method, as they see it.’
      • ‘The charter recognized the Islamic constitution and its nominally federal system.’
      • ‘One of the most important documents in our constitutional history is the Magna Carta, a charter of rights extracted by the nobility from King John in 1215.’
      • ‘Has a new phase begun, one in which we will see the organization actually take on the decisive role that its charter sets out for it?’
    2. 1.2[with modifier](in the UK) a written statement of the rights of a specified group of people.
      ‘the standard set by the patient's charter’
      • ‘Today's white paper will set out a 10-point customer commitment charter aimed at recruiting the public in the battle against crime and anti social behaviour in their area.’
      • ‘The Patient's Charter requires all patients to be treated with dignity and respect.’
      • ‘Doctors were sceptical about the impact of the patient's charter when it was launched in 1991.’
      • ‘If the customer charter is to be believed it would appear that those passengers who travelled to Dublin that morning are entitled to a refund on their fare.’
      • ‘But, he told them, the troop's charter could be at stake.’
      • ‘Under his plans, a passenger's charter outlining the service customers should expect containing easy-to-read bullet points will be displayed in taxis.’
      • ‘The company has publicised a customer charter to make the euro conversion process as transparent and easy as possible for its customers.’
      • ‘One of the tenets in the chamber of commerce charter states that employees should be able to handle complaints.’
      • ‘She has grandiosely announced that the National Advisory Council headed by her will monitor the implementation of the Government's governance charter.’
      • ‘The Patient's Charter has been in effect for nearly five years.’
      • ‘Sites were interrogated to find whether they included promises of good practice, customer care charters, data protection statements or information about complaints and appeals procedures.’
      • ‘He said that if passengers were more than a hour late because of the breakdown they should send their tickets to the company and they would be recompensed under the company's customer charter.’
      • ‘Later in the month, it will also launch a citizens' charter and formally announce its already operational online complaint management system.’
      • ‘All the signs are that Dyke will try to push even further ahead of commercial rivals in the years up to 2006, when the BBC's charter expires and its has to renegotiate its right to a licence fee.’
      • ‘We should modernise and recognise the need to help those who are in debt, but we should not produce a debtors' charter.’
      • ‘On this evidence, it appears the excision of oral health from national health policy, contravenes the international health charter on all counts.’
    3. 1.3British A policy or law regarded as enabling people to engage more easily in a specified undesirable activity.
      ‘he described the act as a charter for vandals’
      • ‘This is a charter for the rich who don't care, for firms blithe enough to bung it on to their fees, for unions powerful enough to make the employer stump up.’
  • 2[mass noun] The hiring of an aircraft, ship, or motor vehicle for a special purpose.

    ‘a plane on charter to a multinational company’
    • ‘They preferred to go with long-term charters rather than spot hires, he said.’
    • ‘However, he will not be sworn in until the completion of a police investigation currently underway into issues associated with the charter of aircraft in Western Australia some years ago.’
    • ‘It is very difficult, if not impossible, to compare the rates earned by ships under charter to the Navy Board with those of merchant ships carrying civilian cargoes.’
    • ‘One 48-seater aircraft is operating on the new route, while a second in the fleet is available for charter.’
    • ‘It ceased operations in Nicaragua and Venezuela, terminated certain ship charters, closed production sites and sales offices as well as terminating grower contracts.’
    • ‘The bill comes to £300,000 for one week's charter.’
    • ‘Paul Milsom came a week in advance to prepare club boats for charter.’
    • ‘The Ministry of Defence currently has two such ships on charter and may continue to operate these.’
    • ‘The boat is available for private charter at a cost of around $9000 per day.’
    • ‘It is worth noting, however, that diving from the island itself can prove costly, as there is only one facility with one 11m boat for charter at £220 a day.’
    • ‘Going from real estate to on-demand business jet charter seems a bit of a stretch.’
    • ‘In the process, it will likely add the plane to the list of aircraft available for charter.’
    • ‘Boat charter costs around 20 per person per day (based on group of six).’
    • ‘From its base at Leeds Bradford Airport the aircraft will be available for charter to customers across the world.’
    • ‘The sea angling stands were a point of interest, as Sean Lavelle and Mattie Gearghty with skipper John O'Boyle promoted their new boats for charter.’
    • ‘If the entire plane is hired on charter, fares are reduced to even less than half.’
    • ‘In all, the chain processes five million films every year and the wealth generated through this has allowed McAuliffe to branch out into helicopter charters and hotels in Ireland, South Africa and Mozambique.’
    • ‘In the future the type of cruises the company sails will be extended to include dedicated school trips and private charters for corporate entertainment or specialist groups such as bird watchers.’
    hire, hiring, lease, leasing, rent, rental, renting, booking, reservation, reserving
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1[count noun]A ship or vehicle that is hired.
      ‘the fifty foot charter Capricorn will join the team’
      • ‘Those who hire a charter have no such liability.’
      • ‘Dive charters are organised between April and October at a cost of approx £750 all-inclusive for ten days.’
      • ‘With tickets on public transport in such short supply, church and community groups from across Poland are organizing their own charters.’
    2. 2.2[count noun]A trip made by a ship or vehicle under hire.
      ‘he liked to see the boat sparkling clean before each charter’
      • ‘Trip includes air charter from Anchorage and three nights at a scenic mountain lodge located in Alaska's largest mining ghost town.’
      • ‘In order to get the most out of a yacht charter, the minimum length of trip should be about 7 days.’
      • ‘My first outing was a half-day charter, from 7am until midday.’
      • ‘Whales are spotted regularly off such places as the Western Isles and southern Ireland, where whale-watching boat charters have found a growing niche.’
      • ‘We will handle all of the administration for each booking and ensure the boat is thoroughly checked and cleaned before and after each charter.’
      • ‘Paddy also works at the airport and they have included new routes to Waterford and a private charter to Weston airport near Celbridge.’
      • ‘Through a series of charters and fishing trips I worked my way through the islands and back to mainland, arriving in Belize.’
      • ‘Ken had never been to this area which is difficult to reach except by a private charter which is very expensive for anyone travelling alone.’
      • ‘Firstly, you need to consider the type of yacht charter that is suitable for you.’
      • ‘Last year, charters of winter tourism operators went on to the end of April, and this coincided with the beginning of the summer charters, so the two seasons overlapped.’
      • ‘At the beginning of each charter, clients receive a full briefing to familiarise them with the yacht.’
      • ‘It's only really a practical destination from a charter or from a trip based in Normandy.’
      • ‘The aircraft was on a charter and transporting building materials to the Brough of Birsay lighthouse.’
      • ‘There are also private charters available aboard sailing yachts and luxury cruisers.’
      • ‘While golf charters on smaller ships have been successful, some upscale lines with medium to large ships have replaced outside operators with their own programs.’
      • ‘Mayreau is an essential stop-off point on yacht charters.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Grant a charter to (a city, university, or other body)

    ‘chartered corporations’
    • ‘We should charter a similar body with the power and authority to make critical policy recommendations to the president.’
    • ‘In 1412-13 Bishop Wardlaw and Pope Benedict XIII incorporated and chartered St Andrews University, the nation's first.’
    • ‘Elsewhere, corporations were chartered by states to build canals and toll roads as part of the transportation infrastructure to afford access to inland destinations.’
    • ‘For most of the 19th century, corporations were chartered by acts of state legislatures.’
    • ‘None of the representative schools was specifically chartered to serve students with disabilities, and none had cooperative agreements with local school districts.’
    • ‘In 1843, the Alfred school became an academy, and in 1857, it was chartered as Alfred University.’
    • ‘By 1782, Smith convinced the Maryland General Assembly to charter a college in Chestertown.’
    • ‘Leaders of both institutions, which are side by side in Great Horton Road, hope the new chartered university will be more than the sum of its parts.’
    • ‘Existing non-profit corporations, chartered under the current Canada Corporations Act, must apply for incorporation under the new Act within three years.’
    • ‘The committee plan to go to Congress within the year to have the museum chartered.’
    • ‘No new settlements were chartered until after Charles II assumed the throne in 1660.’
    • ‘Universities were chartered to award their own degrees and could within limits lay on whatever courses they liked.’
    • ‘The United States Open University is the sister institution of The Open University chartered more than 30 years ago in the United Kingdom.’
    • ‘The company, also the largest source of financing for home mortgages in the United States, is a shareholder-owned corporation chartered by the U.S. Congress.’
    • ‘Finally, the business development driven corporate university is chartered to help develop business opportunities.’
    • ‘They want to dissolve both institutions to create a new chartered university.’
    • ‘Leaders hope the new chartered university would be more successful in attracting both funding and new students.’
    • ‘The Rotary Club of Taksin Pattaya, chartered earlier this year, celebrated Christmas with a fellowship at the Moon River Pub in North Pattaya.’
    permit, allow, authorize, give a licence to, grant a licence to, give a permit to, grant a permit to, give authorization to, grant authorization to, give authority to, grant authority to, give the right to, grant the right to, give leave to, grant leave to, give permission to, grant permission to
    View synonyms
  • 2Hire (an aircraft, ship, or motor vehicle)

    ‘he immediately chartered a plane to take him to Paris’
    • ‘So many volunteered that they had to charter three ships, which set sail in October 1850.’
    • ‘His aim was to get enough people to charter a ship, and so good was his talking that he got enough names for not one ship, but three.’
    • ‘Tony Blair was also heading for America by Concorde yesterday, having chartered a supersonic aircraft to take him to Washington DC for talks and dinner with President Bush.’
    • ‘We received an offer from a third-party organisation to charter the ship, and we therefore took the decision to cancel.’
    • ‘He then chartered a ship and returned to rescue his crew.’
    • ‘The French government had chartered the ship to deliver heavy equipment for an airstrip that would go through a penguin habitat on the Arctic continent.’
    • ‘The plan is to charter buses to shuttle attendees back and forth.’
    • ‘Always check that the boat you hire or charter has safety equipment on board.’
    • ‘Shipping companies agree to charter their ships at an agreed rate at a certain time in the future.’
    • ‘You can also charter a yacht through a sailing-holiday company.’
    • ‘Previously, the few American companies that shipped goods to Cuba chartered foreign vessels.’
    • ‘Some 173 flights have been cancelled and more than 290 have been delayed since the union started its action, despite the company chartering aircraft.’
    • ‘They had planned to charter a helicopter to fly over the wreckage.’
    • ‘Now, he has more than 9,000 clients and charters his own aircraft to take fans to major sporting events all over Europe.’
    • ‘I will be going now; you should charter a ship in the seaside town.’
    • ‘Bermudans, said their skipper Clay Smith, are already chartering aircraft for the debut on the biggest of stages.’
    • ‘He said importers could charter ships with their own cranes on board at short notice.’
    • ‘The Norwegians eventually realised what was happening and chartered a seal-hunting ship to accept the unit's belated surrender.’
    • ‘The company on Saturday said it would cut its flights by 20 percent and charter five more aircraft to cope with mounting delays.’
    • ‘The companies chartering some aircraft that specifically carry divers as passengers have negotiated a special privilege for them.’
    hire, lease, rent, pay for the use of, book, reserve
    engage
    bespeak
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French chartre, from Latin chartula, diminutive of charta paper (see card).

Pronunciation:

charter

/ˈtʃɑːtə/