Definition of chap-fallen in English:

chap-fallen

(also chop-fallen)

adjective

Archaic
  • With one's lower jaw hanging due to extreme exhaustion or dejection.

    • ‘Poor Kate was so chop-fallen, she looked like a convicted criminal, who would gladly have hid herself, to conceal her mortified pride and deep chagrin.’
    • ‘Several of these half-starved creatures had their heads thrust out over the low pound wall, as if to solicit the interference of passengers, while others, resigned to their fate, stood in drooping postures in the centre of the enclosure, quite chop-fallen.’
    • ‘Funeral pageantry is especially important in Hamlet ‘as a sign of human order rescued from the jaws of chap-fallen death itself’.’
    • ‘Some mocked the evacuation itself, as with one writer who ridiculed it as a ‘sudden and chop-fallen retreat’ that paled next to more ‘glorious feats of war.’’
    • ‘‘Sorry I spoke,’ said Mr. Lathrope, rather chop-fallen at the way in which his suggestion had been taken.’
    despondent, downcast, downhearted, dejected, disconsolate, dispirited, crestfallen, cast down, depressed, disappointed, disheartened, discouraged, demoralized, desolate, heavy-hearted, in low spirits, low-spirited, sad, unhappy, glum, full of gloom, doleful, melancholy, miserable, woebegone, mournful, sorrowful, forlorn, long-faced, fed up, in the doldrums, subdued, wretched, lugubrious, eeyorish, morose, sepulchral, saturnine, dour, mirthless, woeful
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Origin

Late 16th century: from chap.