Definition of chancer in English:



  • A person who exploits any opportunity to further their own ends.

    ‘Prague was full of young chancers, bored with the City’
    • ‘There's a whole city full of chancers round here, but we've always had a lot time for Pete, a man who's managed to keep up a profile despite fate hitting him over and over with the garden rake of misfortune.’
    • ‘While Jackson and the rest of the band might be fans of most things pop, that doesn't extend to the rash of reality TV shows that are throwing out talentless chancers at an ever increasing rate.’
    • ‘Although I remain unconvinced that he hasn't done it in the past, I think it was quite clear that they were chancers and if ever a prosecution put the wrong family on the stand, they were it.’
    • ‘Everybody knows that it is the place where chancers come to launder their reputation - if they have enough money to pay the extortionate lawyers' fees, that is.’
    • ‘What were much more common, as various hacks and police forces found to their cost, were chancers trying either to pass off innocuous material as weapons-grade when they had a customer, or to secure rewards from the authorities.’
    • ‘And the insurgents are no national liberation force, but rather chancers taking potshots at what they consider to be cowardly occupiers.’
    • ‘Defeats to City's fellow strugglers Torquay and Carlisle had seen Orient's stock fall from automatic promotion contenders to play-off chancers.’
    • ‘Back in 1989, when The Charlatans had their first hit with The Only One I Know, they were widely dismissed as baggy chancers.’
    • ‘We take a young chancer, a ducker, a diver, to dinner, to a smart restaurant where Guantanamera stalks every table.’
    • ‘With betting banished from Texas, anybody wanting to earn a living from racing headed to New Mexico, where the tracks attracted a colourful assortment of chancers, drifters and apprentice horsemen.’
    • ‘It conjures up a bunch of whingeing chancers with guitars.’
    • ‘Luc Sante's time in a plastics factory is a testament and reproach to all those academic chancers in the Sixties and Seventies who hoped to get nearer the working class by suffering with them the tedium of the production line.’
    • ‘The City chairman has said he would be willing to negotiate but only on a cash basis ‘because I have seen enough of the chancers and con men who have appeared at other clubs’.’
    • ‘To the casual observer, they can easily be dismissed as Britpop chancers who managed to smuggle some twisted songs and Adam And The Ants fashion sense back onto Top Of The Pops for a spell in the mid-1990s.’
    • ‘The destruction of the old regime has triggered scrappy battles for power and influence, as chancers, coalitions and militias move into the vacuum left by the war.’
    • ‘There is a sense, too, that Spielberg has a special fondness for the young chancer - perhaps recognising something of himself in his precocious exploits.’
    • ‘Despite lurid tales of the Russian mafia, they have far bigger fish to fry than tourists, so miscreants are no more than the petty chancers you'd meet in any Western city.’
    • ‘The great tragedy in this election will be the tens of thousands of angry left wing voters who throw their lot in with a party of chancers and opportunists currently seeking a route to the right.’
    • ‘Doffing its panama hat to the likes of Graham Greene and Somerset Maugham, poet Shukman's promising first volume of fiction features a cast of expat chancers looking for a second bite of the cherry in sundry banana republics.’
    • ‘‘The hopeless chancers and fools who populate the book are no reflection upon those who know the author’.’