Definition of centrist in English:

centrist

adjective

  • Having moderate political views or policies:

    ‘a centrist politician’
    • ‘We just have conservatives and Leftists - though both our major political parties are very centrist.’
    • ‘All that he represents is a very centrist view, with regard to New Zealand society as it is.’
    • ‘He's also the new head of the Democratic Leadership Council, which advocates centrist policies to the Democratic Party.’
    • ‘However, the government followed right-wing, not centrist policies for the next three years.’
    • ‘There may actually be a bigger plurality of solid centrist liberals in Congress today than at any time since World War II.’
    • ‘In Congress, centrist forces are gradually disappearing.’
    • ‘Further, winning presidential candidates tend to be more centrist in their political language than losers.’
    • ‘Yet this goes against the controlling centrist instincts of policy makers and increasingly global business, which need quick, easily measurable results.’
    • ‘Some very bright people develop moderate or centrist proposals and hope that elected officials implement them.’
    • ‘So how did the Court arrive at such a sane and centrist position?’
    • ‘We're back to cautious centrist policies and electoral lists.’
    • ‘Labour has reached its current position of dominance precisely because of the centrist policies people like Blair and Brown espouse.’
    • ‘Moreover, he was something new in this state with an historic taste for populism - a centrist populist.’
    • ‘It was probably some combination of liberal blindness, centrist caution, and simple lack of imagination.’
    • ‘Why are there less overtly political left-wing or centrist weblogs?’
    • ‘The premise was that a candidate who was acceptable to those states would be centrist and capable of recapturing the White House.’
    • ‘The mainstream, on both sides, backs a moderate, centrist approach to relations with China.’
    • ‘It is hard to believe that an ineffective, way left senator can become an effective, activist, centrist president.’
    • ‘Even in 1990 a deal to raise taxes was forged between centrist Dems and moderate Republicans.’
    • ‘He may join some left centrist grouping or lend himself to being used by the right as an independent populist.’

noun

  • A person who holds moderate political views.

    • ‘But the fact that the Christian Democrats and the centrists managed to put something like that together in such a short time was very important.’
    • ‘We really have become a nation of nonideological centrists looking for pragmatic solutions to real problems.’
    • ‘This Western senator was too libertarian for centrists like Rockefeller.’
    • ‘While it is true that Stalinism played a major role in the Chilean defeat, it is impossible to analyze it in isolation from the role of the centrists and revisionists who played the role of willing and unwilling accomplices to Stalinism.’
    • ‘Today, most high-profile Democrats present themselves as centrists.’
    • ‘And the religious centrists who believe that religion should play a larger role in government nonetheless support affirmative action and universal health care.’
    • ‘That the Democrats are still pretty congenial to their centrists suggests the degree to which the party has become, if not less partisan, then surely more ideologically moderate.’
    • ‘This is followed by calls to action to purge the party of these nefarious centrists and moderates who have cost us our natural majority by playing to the middle.’
    • ‘Progressives, who had banded together with Democratic centrists in an unprecedented and deeply felt display of unity, will then be faced with a choice whose importance is hard to underestimate.’
    • ‘These were pledges that, in 1992, won over political centrists like me.’
    • ‘Indeed, the latter has had only one aim for 26 years: to minimise the role of the centrists and the liberals.’
    • ‘They tend to view everyone to their left - centrists, moderates, liberals, and radicals alike - as a single, undifferentiated group.’
    • ‘And it turns out that the Republicans were able to win the middle-of-the-roaders, the moderates, the centrists.’
    • ‘So maybe gay political moderates and centrists should have their own Millennial March on Washington for faith and family, after all.’
    • ‘Why have political fortunes been so much better for Democratic centrists than Republicans?’
    • ‘That could pull Democrats further leftward and the GOP rightward, leaving centrists in the dust.’
    • ‘What about the centrists and the moderates - excuse me for interrupting - who might be alienated by some of the views that you and the liberal wing of the party would put forward?’
    • ‘But at the federal level, President Clinton managed to skirt the issue, preventing a split between the teachers' unions and Democratic centrists.’
    • ‘The answer must be yes; for if he cannot, the courts will become the province of those anodyne centrists whose views don't offend anyone with power.’
    • ‘The bitterness in her voice was clear, because, as one of the National Party's centrists, she knows that this is a good policy.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from French centriste, from Latin centrum (see centre).

Pronunciation:

centrist

/ˈsɛntrɪst/