Definition of Catholicize in English:

Catholicize

(also Catholicise)

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make Roman Catholic; convert to Catholicism:

    ‘the intention was to Catholicize Hungary after the Turkish occupation’
    • ‘He was concerned about the Catholicising tendencies of the Oxford Movement.’
    • ‘Prior to eliminating any Protestant or Buddhist, he had first to Catholicize the fabric of Vietnam.’
    • ‘Believing that the natives were savage, the new Americans were determined to Christianize or Catholicize the so-called savages.’
    • ‘The Catholicising Stuarts were asked back but the Restoration, as Scott shows, solved nothing.’
    • ‘Considerable numbers also came to escape the narrow confines of what was until quite recently a highly Catholicised society.’
    • ‘Much of Kyushu had been Catholicized and Nagasaki was as Christian a city as 5th century Constantinople.’
    • ‘As King Charles I increased his Catholicising process of the Anglican church, more and more religious refugees set off for New England.’
    • ‘The Spanish and French were particularly clear about their Catholicizing mission.’
    • ‘Furthermore, Pope Leo XIII knew that the rush of partisan politics was diverting the attention of Catholics from the business of Catholicizing their nation.’
    • ‘In 1687, shortly before he had finished writing his Principia, he actively opposed King James II's attempt to Catholicise the universities and other institutions.’
    • ‘The region was effectively Catholicized during the Counter-Reformation.’
    • ‘A 16-hour video series of his talks, Catholicizing America, is also being marketed at this time.’
    • ‘In the years since Magellan landed on Guam, our people have been colonized, proselytized, Catholicized, and subsidized.’
    • ‘Franciscan missionaries moved into the area of the Rio Grande and began attempts to Catholicise the First Nations populations.’
    • ‘Not until the nineteenth century would some rural areas of Italy be fully Catholicized.’
    • ‘When James II ascended the throne in 1685 and Catholicised the country Prince William planned to invade Britain in the name of his Protestant wife.’
    • ‘While Episcopalianism stands at a crossroads at present, that which remains of their traditional liturgy has become almost unconsciously Catholicized in the past century.’
    • ‘This is a superstitious, heavily Catholicized region where rapt attention is paid the priests who hold court and scare the locals.’
    • ‘However, today, any sacred meaning in them has been transferred to the saints and Catholicized ceremony.’
    • ‘But James's Catholicising policies and the birth of a Catholic son and heir in 1688, threatened to rob him of the prize.’

Pronunciation:

Catholicize

/kəˈθɒlɪsʌɪz/