Main definitions of catholic in English

: catholic1Catholic2

catholic1

adjective

  • Including a wide variety of things; all-embracing.

    ‘her tastes are pretty catholic’
    diverse, diversified, wide, broad, broad-based, eclectic, indiscriminate
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Catholic.

Pronunciation

catholic

/ˈkaθ(ə)lɪk/

Main definitions of catholic in English

: catholic1Catholic2

Catholic2

adjective

  • 1Of the Roman Catholic faith.

    • ‘Some catholic priests will allow mixed marriages and some won't.’
    • ‘It is indisputable that Catholic education is rooted in a faith community.’
    • ‘With or without the pope, the catholic universities go on training young theologians.’
    • ‘In late 1984 I was living in sin in the Latrobe Valley with a girl of catholic upbringing.’
    • ‘The review was being conducted in seven regional zones, plus another concentrating on catholic schools.’
    • ‘He had been briefly married to Mary, Queen of Scots, who was herself ardently catholic and influenced by the Guise family.’
    • ‘I owe all of my successes to one Catholic priest and to Christ, who inspired him.’
    • ‘Would the Huguenot Bourbon family, if successful, tolerate a catholic monarchy?’
    • ‘I was born and raised catholic, but I was always uneasy with my catholic education.’
    • ‘The funeral was a Catholic Requiem Mass, but the variety of groups of Philip's friends made the event anything but catholic.’
    • ‘The two principles that guided his life and career were a deep Catholic faith and Catalan nationalism.’
    • ‘Protestant Christianity rejects the cult of the saints so crucial to medieval and modern Catholic Christianity.’
    • ‘It was used to teach catholic children the truths of their religion when that religion was suppressed in England.’
    • ‘Since 1854, the immaculate conception has been an essential dogma of the Catholic faith.’
    • ‘For what Galileo did next was to set out at great length his arguments that the Catholic faith should not in any way depend on facts of science.’
    • ‘Believing in the authenticity of such apparitions is not even a requirement of Catholic faith.’
    • ‘In high school, there was a series of talks on various social issues given to us by devoutly catholic speakers.’
    • ‘Elaborate meals are served on Christmas Eve by Catholic families who attend midnight Mass.’
    • ‘Archbishop Cullen then presided over a committee to set up a catholic university.’
    • ‘School pupils were put to the taste test when TV chef Peter Vaughan visited St Augustine's catholic college.’
    1. 1.1 Of or including all Christians.
      • ‘To the extent this is true, it is a betrayal of the universal and catholic mission of Orthodoxy.’
    2. 1.2 Relating to the historic doctrine and practice of the Western Church.
      ‘the Church of England must not compromise its Catholic principles’
      • ‘Actually they seem to argue more accurately for certain heresies than they do for the Catholic doctrines.’
      • ‘Plus, historical evidence shows that the Catholic church did at least appoint women as deacons between the third and ninth centuries.’
      • ‘So also, in Catholic and Orthodox Christianity is the image of the Mother and Child.’
      • ‘One reason, no doubt, was the Oxford Movement and its revival of Catholic practice.’
      • ‘Moreover, far from being a heretic, he loyally endorsed the essentials of Catholic doctrine.’

noun

  • A member of the Roman Catholic Church.

    • ‘As a practising Catholic I find that such claims are best left to priests or religious teachers.’
    • ‘I don't get involved in debates between Catholics and Protestants about the Pope.’
    • ‘The crowning of James did indeed herald a more lenient and accepting climate for Catholics initially.’
    • ‘Being a catholic the hostess went and bought some fish, then with salad and wine in hand we went to their place for a yummy fish feast.’
    • ‘It was ordinary Catholics, however, who suffered the longest as a result of the Gunpowder Plot.’
    • ‘The Vatican will either give ground to ease the pressure on Catholics in China or it will not.’
    • ‘He is backing a call by Italian bishops for all Catholics to abstain from voting.’
    • ‘Under the law of the church, remarried Catholics are prohibited from communion.’
    • ‘However, the conflict between Protestants and Catholics was all too often bloody.’
    • ‘It is also time that ordinary lay Catholics be given more positions of responsibility in the Church.’
    • ‘Both his father and mother, he says, were devout Catholics and daily mass-goers.’
    • ‘His father William was a catholic, but his mother was a Protestant.’
    • ‘Though when she was child, she did think that the Catholics spent an inordinate amount of time in church.’
    • ‘Traditionally, Catholics see their church as partner of the state, not part of it.’
    • ‘But what happens if a future monarch either is a catholic, or converts to Catholicism?’
    • ‘In such a church, no one could seriously hope to control what Catholics read and hear.’
    • ‘He was a devout catholic and was always writing prayers to his patron saint, Saint Rita of lost causes.’
    • ‘He also opposed discrimination against Catholics by local government agencies.’
    • ‘She was a single lady who was a devout catholic and deeply religious.’
    • ‘He classed Calvinists and Catholics as his enemies and it was difficult to assess whose side he was actually on.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French catholique or late Latin catholicus, from Greek katholikos ‘universal’, from kata ‘in respect of’ + holos ‘whole’.

Pronunciation

Catholic

/ˈkaθ(ə)lɪk/