Definition of castigate in English:

castigate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]formal
  • Reprimand (someone) severely.

    ‘he was castigated for not setting a good example’
    • ‘In recent weeks, the Manchester United captain has resembled a walking volcano, castigating his colleagues for their deficiencies as the club finished a troubled campaign trophy-less.’
    • ‘And just a few days ago I was castigating someone else for being a thin-skinned Narcissist.’
    • ‘In print, on his radio show and in private, the growling newshound frequently castigates reporters for not breaking bigger and better stories.’
    • ‘Whenever a politician takes a definite and contentious view on any issue, he or she is castigated for daring to articulate that opinion.’
    • ‘He had castigated the team for, among other things, unprofessionalism and indiscipline.’
    • ‘After the disastrous tour of New Zealand, the media was castigating the team, we replied with a good World Cup campaign.’
    • ‘A friend used to castigate me for not wearing a belt.’
    • ‘You must forgive my candor, I am not castigating you… I don't know the extent to which the Bill was accessible.’
    • ‘‘What we should be doing, rather than castigating anyone or laying blame is encouraging people to come forward and show civic spirit,’ he said.’
    • ‘He castigated the officials who had sent the girls out to compete on a less than level playing field.’
    • ‘It was for his denial of the doctrine of karma and the efficacy of the religious effort that the Buddha castigated him so severely.’
    • ‘It's been a bitter debate, with many castigating reporters of the case as conspiracy theorists and worse.’
    • ‘The most common response was to castigate the reporter for daring to criticize a sacred cow hereabouts, weblogs.’
    • ‘He castigates prize judges for giving the top awards to books for reason extrinsic to literature.’
    • ‘I just wanted to be absolutely clear on this because I've gotten a number of emails castigating me for pretending that.’
    • ‘Moreover, there's no point in castigating the losers.’
    • ‘This is why we castigate our leaders - our political leaders, our church leaders and our society leaders.’
    • ‘The actress tells of how she was so infuriated by the letter that she wrote a reply, castigating the woman for assuming she knew her parents' beliefs better than she did.’
    • ‘I could say more but, it being the season to be jolly, I will refrain from further castigating my friends in the legal profession.’
    • ‘The former schoolmaster was never happy with the media when they were castigating him for years of failure with Edinburgh and, if anything, he appears even less comfortable now the press that he receives is universally favourable.’
    reprimand, rebuke, admonish, chastise, chide, upbraid, reprove, reproach, scold, remonstrate with, berate, take to task, pull up, lambaste, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one's mind, haul over the coals, lecture, criticize, censure
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin castigare ‘reprove’, from castus ‘pure, chaste’.

Pronunciation

castigate

/ˈkastɪɡeɪt/