Definition of carriage in English:

carriage

noun

  • 1British Any of the separate sections of a train that carry passengers.

    ‘the first-class carriages’
    • ‘Only a single carriage on each train contains an access point, so participants should reserve a seat in that coach, the company suggests.’
    • ‘At the meeting, it was stated that there would be a further inspection of the carriages, locomotives and railway tracks.’
    • ‘There are also new power sockets in both first class and standard carriages for passengers to recharge mobiles and laptops, improved luggage storage and completely refitted toilets.’
    • ‘Two train carriages and an engine stand at the platform of what was once Hawes Station and is now one end of the museum.’
    • ‘The steam locomotive was travelling backwards from Rawtenstall to Ramsbottom, pulling three carriages carrying 20 passengers.’
    • ‘Converted from five antique Pullman rail carriages, The Sidings Hotel and Restaurant cuts a distinctive figure on the edge of the East Coast Main Line.’
    • ‘The first 12 train carriages for the high-speed railway arrived at Kaohsiung Harbor yesterday.’
    • ‘It was a train - a passenger carriage, decked in nothing but black and white.’
    • ‘But it was a busy train, and the carriage did not stay private for long.’
    • ‘However, I still defend my right to smoke in some public places, and am strongly in favour of smoking and non-smoking areas in pubs, restaurants and railway carriages.’
    • ‘The new railcars are more easily accessible than the current train carriages.’
    • ‘The Christmas train consisted of modern passenger carriages, generator cars and a caboose, with a diesel switch engine on either end.’
    • ‘More importantly, perhaps, the technology would allow people to use phones in places such as train carriages, cinemas or libraries without disturbing others.’
    • ‘The appellant was convicted of smoking in a railway carriage, in breach of a by-law made by British Railways in 1965.’
    • ‘The boat trains and beautiful Pullman carriages are now replaced by the Eurostar.’
    • ‘Hundreds of rail enthusiasts have helped to secure the future of a Royal Train carriage at the National Railway Museum in York.’
    • ‘It was the fault of a vehicle falling off the bridge onto the railway, which caused a freight train to crash into a passenger carriage.’
    • ‘Take time to stroll through the acres of woodland to the rear of the building itself, complete with steam train, carriages and a children's enchanted island with miniature houses.’
    • ‘In its heyday, Swindon works employed more than 16,000 people, overhauling locomotives and carriages for the Great Western Railway and later for British Rail.’
    • ‘So that's how I ended up in a deserted carriage on a 6am train to Brighton.’
    1. 1.1 A four-wheeled passenger vehicle pulled by two or more horses.
      ‘a horse-drawn carriage’
      • ‘Overworked horses pulling carriages laden with tourists trot frantically up the hill as the fierce morning sun beats down.’
      • ‘Even as I watched, the metal gate about thirty yards away from me swung open and a carriage pulled by four brown horses entered.’
      • ‘A covered carriage with sled runners pulled by four strong horses is awaiting its passengers.’
      • ‘Two open carriages each pulled by a pair of placid horses had begun to make their parking lot rounds when I sat down.’
      • ‘There were seven people sitting in the carriage being pulled by four proud horses.’
      • ‘They probably did, as they cursed the puddles and horse dung and dodged the horse-drawn carriages and drays.’
      • ‘She was among 15 tourists hurt when a convoy of horses pulling carriages along the steep mountain paths from the glacier bolted unexpectedly, throwing the passengers to the ground.’
      • ‘Twelve horses pulled the magnificent carriage across the road and through puddles of mud of varying size and depth.’
      • ‘A couple have told how they are lucky to be alive after a horse pulling their carriage ran amok and started a stampede during a holiday pleasure trip.’
      • ‘As it approached James fired a warning shot in the air, which erupted with a loud bang that echoed through the trees, and the horses pulling the carriage reared and it came to a halt.’
      • ‘Slowly, over the hill came a carriage being pulled by two large brown horses.’
      • ‘They were among fifteen tourists hurt when the horses pulling their carriages bolted unexpectedly during a tour of the Briksdal glacier in Stryn, western Norway, on Monday.’
      • ‘Most people were walking around on the streets, with only a few on horses and horse-drawn carriages.’
      • ‘The horse then began to pull the carriage away, and it was only a few seconds before they were out of my sight.’
      • ‘Earlier in the evening, students had arrived for the black tie event in limousines and horse drawn carriages before being taken to Cheltenham.’
      • ‘On the left, there is a horse-drawn carriage, minus the horses.’
      • ‘Two horses were pulling the carriage but Jok was not guiding them.’
      • ‘For instance, most English city streets were built when ‘traffic’ consisted of small carriages pulled by skinny horses.’
      • ‘The carriage was pulled along the cobbled pathway, the horses working their way up a slight hill.’
      • ‘One-horse carts or carriages pulled by four or five horses went back and forth in clouds of yellow dust.’
      wagon, hackney, hansom, gig, landau, trap, caravan, car
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A wheeled support for moving a heavy object such as a gun.
      ‘a US army howitzer and carriage’
      • ‘The weapon carriage is lightweight welded aluminum, mounted on a variable recoil mechanism.’
      • ‘The guns were so designed as to produce almost no recoil and thus they could do without heavy carriages.’
      • ‘The carriage supports the weapon in the firing and traveling positions.’
  • 2British mass noun The conveying of goods or passengers from one place to another.

    ‘the carriage of bikes on public transport’
    • ‘I remember, one of the regulations before a dog would be accepted for carriage was it had to have a muzzle attached to its collar and chain so that the dog could be muzzled if it happened to turn nasty.’
    • ‘These include regulations regarding carriage and use of fuel cells on airplanes and other forms of public transport.’
    • ‘Small (four-seat) and expensive, they offered carriage at speed and cost two to three times that by stage wagon.’
    • ‘The licence that is pleaded is a licence under the State Act which is only required for intrastate carriage.’
    • ‘The rolling stock will be provided by the company and meets all European standards for carriage of passengers.’
    • ‘That is no reason why a contract should not subsequently be made to include an obligation of proper carriage from the commencement of the voyage.’
    • ‘The high and uncertain cost of carriage by pack train encouraged demands for the introduction of speedier and more flexible means of transport.’
    • ‘Amtrak also competes with Greyhound and other private bus lines in passenger carriage.’
    • ‘It may be that in a few years the letter rate will be meaningless, as nobody sends letters anymore, and the other rates simply reflect the cost of carriage.’
    • ‘Also, make sure that you have the paperwork to prove that you've paid for it's carriage otherwise you might find that it's not going on the plane.’
    • ‘Applying this test, it is clear that an arbitration clause is not directly relevant to the shipment, carriage and delivery of goods.’
    transport, transportation, conveyance, transfer, transference, delivery, distribution, carrying, transmission, movement, haulage, freight, freightage, portage, cartage, shipment
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    1. 2.1 The harbouring of a potentially disease-causing organism by a person or animal that does not contract the disease.
      • ‘Nasal carriage of organisms may predispose to recurrent infection in an individual.’
      • ‘Breakthrough infections and chronic carriage were clearly and strongly related to peak antibody concentrations.’
      • ‘However, if true vaccine failures and carriage rates increase over the next few years, then a booster dose may be necessary.’
      • ‘The organism is cleared efficiently after a short duration of carriage.’
      • ‘The likelihood that antibiotic use will, in the short term, result in carriage of a resistant organism needs to be built into clinical decision making.’
  • 3A moving part of a machine that carries other parts into the required position.

    ‘a typewriter carriage’
    • ‘In assembly, where practically every operation is manual, engines shuttle down the line on carriages that swivel to allow workers easy access from any angle.’
    • ‘This also means swiveling around the sliding carriage that holds the file, and duplicating the angles you used earlier.’
  • 4in singular A person's bearing or deportment.

    ‘her carriage was graceful, her movements quick and deft’
    • ‘This is a broad definition, encompassing essentially the whole carriage and deportment of the body.’
    • ‘The other was perhaps no older than me, but with a bearing and carriage of a great Lady.’
    • ‘He was no older than myself but he had the bearing and carriage of a full grown man.’
    • ‘He had very handsome features with a strong muscular frame, tall and strong-limbed with graceful carriage and dignified bearing.’
    • ‘Her carriage was royal, and her bearing haughty and most formal.’
    • ‘The man who had just spoken was a slender one, fair of feature, and his carriage was bold as he approached my position.’
    posture, bearing, stance, gait, comportment
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old Northern French cariage, from carier (see carry).

Pronunciation

carriage

/ˈkarɪdʒ/