Definition of career break in English:

career break


  • A period of time during which one chooses not to work, typically in order to bring up one's children or pursue other interests.

    ‘I had taken a three-year career break to bring up my daughter’
    • ‘Non-economically active women include a large proportion who are voluntarily outside employment, notably mothers looking after children, as well as women taking a career break or carers.’
    • ‘Most of them want to travel abroad during their career break.’
    • ‘Mick is a police officer who has taken a career break in order to organise and develop the scheme.’
    • ‘Employees can take a "career break" of up to one year as part of the company's standard human-resources policy, though they do forfeit their benefits.’
    • ‘On the whole women earn less (even now), take longer career breaks, retire earlier and live longer than men.’
    • ‘Alas, the majority of women have problems with saving for retirement, thanks to lower wages, part-time working and maternity and career breaks.’
    • ‘His wife, while on a career break, set up an organic box delivery business modelled on an existing London company.’
    • ‘For women, deemed more likely to take career breaks, the minimum saving requirement is likely to be higher still.’
    • ‘A career break can be provided for up to five years with the job guaranteed when the employee returns.’
    • ‘I have looked on the past three years as a career break, and thought that when our youngest child was in playschool, I would look for work.’
    • ‘The flip side, of course, is that it will show up any career breaks so you'll need to be prepared to talk about them.’
    • ‘However, whilst bringing up my children I had a 10-year career break.’
    • ‘Women should be contributing about 15 per cent more to their pensions than their male colleagues, particularly if they have taken a career break of several years to raise children.’
    • ‘Sean is a 50-year-old who has taken a three-year career break and is deciding how to fund the shortfall in service to maximise his pension benefits.’
    • ‘Well gap years aren't just for students - a YouGov survey has shown that one in seven adults have taken a career break to travel.’
    • ‘Equally surprising was the finding that 88 per cent of respondents were planning to take a career break at some point in their working lives.’
    • ‘Service before and after a career break may be added together for the purposes of determining a full year of service.’
    • ‘What he needed was a career break.’
    • ‘People who are on a career break, rearing children or who are unemployed, or those who move from job to job, are also suited to the new products.’
    • ‘If either of them has the career break or abandons work outside the home altogether when children arrive, it will be her.’