Definition of carcinogenesis in English:

carcinogenesis

noun

  • [mass noun] The initiation of cancer formation.

    • ‘DNA adduct formation is a critical event in mutagenesis and in the initiation of carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘For biliary duct cancers, p53 gene mutation is an important contributor to carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘Reduction in induced carcinogenesis by various chemical carcinogens has been well documented.’
    • ‘Digital cellular phones and cordless phones have not been in use for as long as analog phones in Sweden, and this might be of importance for carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘Oranges are rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that may prevent oxidative damage to DNA, thus protecting against carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘Its role in carcinogenesis also merits further study.’
    • ‘An altered apoptotic response represents a pivotal feature of cancer, contributing to carcinogenesis and resistance to therapy.’
    • ‘One of the principal mechanisms of the anticarcinogenic activity of tea is inhibition of the initiation stage of carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘And mutagenicity is of course a bad thing, because increased DNA damage is generally held to be a factor in carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘Chemoprevention of cancer aims to prevent, arrest, or reverse either the initiation phase of carcinogenesis or the progression of neoplastic cells to cancer.’
    • ‘Finally, reinitiating lung growth may increase susceptibility to carcinogenesis and metastasis.’
    • ‘Establishment of an early and reliable biomarker for oral carcinogenesis will enable early diagnosis of cancer.’
    • ‘Among treatment-related causes, radiation-induced carcinogenesis has been well recognized for nearly a century.’
    • ‘While animal studies have suggested an aetiological role for high fat intake in colorectal carcinogenesis, such evidence is very hard to extrapolate to humans living freely.’
    • ‘This pattern of expression suggests that cyclin DI overexpression may be an early event in endometrial carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘It is not possible to say anything about the risk of cancer because it takes decades to disclose chemical carcinogenesis in human beings.’
    • ‘The temporal transition of a mucosal cell from a normal state to dysplasia and eventually carcinoma can be explained by the multistep theory of carcinogenesis.’
    • ‘If accepted, this altered view of cervical carcinogenesis will reshape clinical practice in the next few years.’
    • ‘Further characterization of the function of these genes in lung carcinogenesis may lead to the development of novel targeted therapies.’
    • ‘Thus, the association of reactive oxygen species both in carcinogenesis and in cancer progression has been shown in numerous investigations.’

Pronunciation:

carcinogenesis

/ˌkɑːs(ɪ)nəˈdʒɛnɪsɪs/