Definition of carboy in English:

carboy

noun

  • A large globular glass bottle with a narrow neck, typically protected by a frame and used for holding acids or other corrosive liquids.

    • ‘Only two months were left of our field season, and that was spent largely on cross-country skis, hauling sleds laden with carboys full of seawater.’
    • ‘Fill the carboy just to the neck, but not so full that bubbles from residual fizzing will reach the mouth.’
    • ‘For experiments using the six natural resource assemblages, we collected the water i n 20 - L polyethylene carboys, and immediately screened the water through an 80-p.m mesh to remove other zooplankton.’
    • ‘The large show carboys in the window, containing coloured water, became the familiar sign of the chemist and druggist.’
    • ‘Many wines spend considerably more time in wood than the legal minimum and are sometimes aged in 20-l / 5-gal glass carboys, or garrafoes, before bottling.’
    • ‘Stainless steel containers, and glass bottles and carboys (larger containers) are best.’
    • ‘It doesn't take long to mix it and put it into the standard 23 litre plastic carboys.’
    • ‘We're again buying 25-litre carboys of drinking water.’
    • ‘Then you transfer the wort to a glass carboy, preferably, although you can use a plastic bucket with a well fitting lid (this is a bad idea but some people do brew this way) and you pitch the yeast.’
    • ‘At each station a composite vertical series of five 3 liter water samples were taken above the photic zone and placed in a carboy, mixed, and a 500 ml sample drawn off and fixed with Lugol's solution.’
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Origin

Mid 18th century: from Persian qarāba large glass flagon.

Pronunciation:

carboy

/ˈkɑːbɔɪ/