Definition of calypso in English:

calypso

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A kind of West Indian (originally Trinidadian) music in syncopated African rhythm, typically with words improvised on a topical theme.

    ‘the men sing calypso as they work’
    [as modifier] ‘calypso music’
    • ‘The sound of soft calypso music drifts down from another deck as, below her, waves lap at the side of the ship.’
    • ‘While listening to calypso music, many of those being entertained like to dance the limbo, a dance very popular among Grenadian Americans.’
    • ‘They had been arrested together for singing calypsos on Wrightson Road, Port-of-Spain and though their careers had taken decidedly different paths, there was an intimacy to their relationship that was truly profound.’
    • ‘Favorite types of music include calypso, reggae, and religious hymns.’
    • ‘The postcolonial period has witnessed a significant creolizing of church music, which has been influenced by calypso, reggae, and African American gospel music.’
    • ‘I don't care if it's classical, funk, salsa, reggae, calypso; it's all dance music.’
    • ‘The calypso, reggae, and steel band music of Trinidad and Jamaica are also very popular.’
    • ‘West Indian calypso and reggae music are both popular.’
    • ‘Although its roots are similar to those of calypso and reggae, it is more authenticly African.’
    • ‘The disc is full of salsa, trip-hop, acid jazz, calypso and reggae beats.’
    • ‘The bar, a cavernous construction of breeze-blocks, heaves with energy, in an easy mix of sailors and islanders, whipped up by a local band running through the year's carnival calypsos from Trinidad.’
    • ‘Two forms of native Trinidadian music - calypso and steel drum music - have become famous throughout the world.’
    • ‘The steel drums used in calypso music are made from these 55-gallon containers.’
    • ‘The project has formed a band called Raw Energy which fuses reggae, African rhythm, calypso, rhumba and rock.’
    • ‘The 31-year-old singer blends the best of Caribbean and South London sounds, including reggae, calypso, jazz and British pop music.’
    • ‘Wherever you go on on this laid-back island, the palm trees sway to the sounds of soca and calypso music.’
    • ‘The steel pan is our gift to the world as is our calypso music.’
    • ‘The Crop Over festival features costume bands, folk music, and calypso competitions.’
    • ‘Reflecting an African heritage, this music combines the African ‘call-and-response’ with features of calypso and reggae.’
    • ‘In addition to American and British music, reggae, calypso, and Zairian music are popular.’
    • ‘Trinidad has a thriving rock music scene whose best bands blend reggae and calypso with mainstream rock.’
    • ‘The musical style is similar to West Indian calypso and reggae.’
    1. 1.1[count noun]A calypso song.
      ‘a man was playing a calypso on a double bass’
      • ‘Other calypsos failed to pull much reaction from the crowd.’
      • ‘After I bought the machine, I used to go around recording calypsos at different nightclubs, and eventually had the records made in England.’
      • ‘The Police Band performed local calypsos such as the Ashanti's Malaway while the officers on parade entertained the impressive crowd.’
      • ‘Although others have followed Holman's lead and composed tunes specifically for Panorama, popular calypsos still usually win.’
      • ‘As such, it's part of Trinidad folklore and history, and certainly one of the greatest calypsos ever written.’
      • ‘Despite its Trinidadian roots, Cariwest happens in Edmonton, and so it's quite possible that the crowds might hear calypsos about mad cow disease or SARS!’
      • ‘Rocket Ship Beach was the first in a series of albums in which Zanes and guests perform folk songs, lullabies, Broadway standards, calypsos and a few originals in a rootsy-but-rocking style.’
      • ‘The calypsos are OK, but I think they lack quality.’
      • ‘It was the melodic basis of many early 20th-century calypsos, and today it lives on as the traditional tune for extempo competitions, in which calypsonians show off their quick wits and lyrical skills by inventing.’
      • ‘If you have never seen him live, this is an opportunity to see a master of his instrument but also a great showman, exemplified by his calypsos such as ‘Don't Stop the Carnival’.’
      • ‘I grew up with calypsos and Afro-Cuban music at home, so Caribbean music was there from the beginning.’
      • ‘The band obliged with a medley of festival type calypsos, only to find audience demand yet unsatisfied, forcing the players to perform yet another calypso medley before the lights finally went down.’
      • ‘Set to a distinct rhythmic beat, calypsos are songs of social commentary that range from the comic to the tragic.’
      • ‘Not many local calypsos have as long lasting effects as Nash's did.’
      • ‘Hollis Liverpool wrote his first calypsos in 1954, when he was a pupil at St Mary's College in Port of Spain, and turned professional in the late 60s.’
      • ‘Their followers, chanting calypsos, strumming guitars and banging dustbin lids, swarmed on the field and began triumphant tribal dances.’
      • ‘Sheynnene has toured the Caribbean, North America, the UK and South America performing her winning selections and other popular calypsos.’
      • ‘Flamenco, blues, calypsos, ballads, and a myriad other song forms have made their way into the consciousness of these people with the direct or indirect assistance of his endeavours.’
      • ‘It is much better than the other boring calypsos I've heard.’
      • ‘He also learned to play the steel pan, and he and his sister composed calypsos together; she wrote the text and he wrote the music.’

Origin

1930s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

calypso

/kəˈlɪpsəʊ/

Definition of Calypso in English:

Calypso

proper noun

Greek Mythology
  • A nymph who kept Odysseus on her island, Ogygia, for seven years.

Origin

Greek, literally she who conceals.

Pronunciation:

Calypso

/kəˈlɪpsəʊ/