Definition of cake in English:

cake

noun

  • 1An item of soft sweet food made from a mixture of flour, fat, eggs, sugar, and other ingredients, baked and sometimes iced or decorated.

    ‘a fruit cake’
    as modifier ‘a cake shop’
    mass noun ‘a mouthful of cake’
    • ‘Gâteaux Bretons are larger cakes made of rich better, poured into a cake mold, scraped with a fork, then baked until golden brown.’
    • ‘Using tea instead of water in the recipe gives the honey cake a nice foundation and added depth of flavor.’
    • ‘And using buckwheat honey gives the sweetness a full bodied taste, something not often found in most sweet cakes.’
    • ‘Processed foods such as cakes, cookies, mayonnaise, and corn chips contain hydrogenated oil.’
    • ‘In fact, it is a genuine snack spot with scones, teacakes, cakes and biscuits being the staple fare.’
    • ‘Now if someone offered me a cream cake I would turn it down and it's no hardship.’
    • ‘Headteacher Lisa Tudor said the rule even applied to children bringing in birthday cake from home to share.’
    • ‘Home-made jams, biscuits, cakes, sweets and marmelades are ideal presents for those with a sweet tooth.’
    • ‘The large Christening cake was cut and divided up.’
    • ‘We shared a slice of cake and it proved to be a light and refreshing way to round off the meal.’
    • ‘Christmas is a few days away and it is time for choirs and concerts when you are not baking cakes and decorating your Christmas tree.’
    • ‘Petite, buttery madeleines are nothing more than moist little cakes baked in a pan with shell-shaped indentations.’
    • ‘Lauren paused to start on the biggest piece of chocolate cake we'd ever seen.’
    • ‘To begin with, it was all puddings and cakes and sweets, and I would make fudge, toffee, nougat.’
    • ‘Their wedding cake was a sheet cake decorated to look like a hockey arena.’
    • ‘Then they started to hit out, and we seemed to lose the will to win - perhaps it was something the opposition put in the cream cake they'd given us for tea.’
    • ‘Now she manages to control her feelings by avoiding sweet foods such as cakes, chocolate and even bananas.’
    • ‘Desserts, sweets, cakes, biscuits, and pastries are considered to be luxuries.’
    • ‘Little chefs can bake a cake or delicious muffins in the two-shelf oven or store extra plates and bowls in the cupboard.’
    • ‘If you really want to delight your guests, send them home with a cake of their own - a copy of the recipe attached to the top.’
    • ‘Once the mixture is smooth, spread it over the cake and decorate with thyme flowers.’
    • ‘Now, go take advantage of being the birthday girl and have a big piece of cake for me.’
    • ‘The candles on the 30th birthday cake were lit and blown out, the cake was cut and shared and the real Gala began.’
    • ‘The carrot cake was delicious and then there was a cheesecake - not what I had asked for.’
    • ‘Food consisted of bagels, speciality savouries, pastries and cakes.’
    • ‘There was a small cake decorated with whipped cream and chocolate.’
    • ‘At first I needed the coffee to get me over the shock of the price of the cake.’
    • ‘While baking the cakes and galettes I started cooking dinner.’
    • ‘I've experimented with baking cakes with these flours, and the result is remarkably grainy and indigestible.’
    • ‘There were speeches and the cutting of an anniversary cake.’
    gateau, kuchen
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the cakeBritish The amount of money or assets available to be divided up or shared.
      ‘you have not received a fair slice of the education cake’
      • ‘He has rightly given a privileged role to renewables, saying they must rise as a share of the energy cake to 10 per cent by 2010.’
      • ‘When it comes to dividing up the cake, there will be nothing left when the silly, expensive initiatives of the metropolitan areas have been gorged.’
      • ‘Councils nationwide collect business rates for the Government, which in turn shares out the cake according to its own peculiar system of interpreting need.’
      • ‘The share of the cake of our liberation struggle has not been equal.’
      • ‘The corporate sector could not be securing a bigger part of national income cake too.’
      • ‘We want a better deal for country and coastal communities in terms of services, their share of the cake and their quality of life.’
      • ‘Business Line charts out the way the cake has been divided.’
      • ‘It has moved from talking about growing the cake, to now getting on with the job of deciding how it will divide the cake up.’
      • ‘Now, there are three or four other independents looking for a share of the cake.’
      • ‘As the fight for a share of this cake becomes ever more fierce, the newcomers and smaller players are the ones who could suffer, especially if all they have to talk about is a car repair.’
      • ‘Fellow Namibians let's be fair to each other and share the national cake equally.’
      • ‘But they said the area continued to receive a smaller share of the cake than was warranted by the amount of crime committed in it.’
      • ‘At the end of the day, the result is that the same, not very large, cake is being divided up in a slightly different way.’
      • ‘Dividing the cake fairly is never easy: it is a thankless task, and subject to much criticism by pressure groups.’
      • ‘I know figures can be produced which will show Carlow has done very well in recent years but compared to other counties I don't think it has enjoyed an equal share of the cake.’
      • ‘This means that some people don't get the share of the cake they need, as their parents may be less financially secure than the Loans Company makes them out to be.’
      • ‘That will mean the cake will have to be divided 16 ways (of course the Warriors would benefit from their own gate revenue etc).’
      • ‘India has grand plans to have a substantial share of the cake and expects to earn substantial additional funds by 2007.’
      • ‘Without the present generation of working people and their families there would be nobody to pay our pensions and we should see they get their fair share of the national cake.’
      • ‘He was being questioned by members about schemes, job predictions and Bradford's share of the funding cake.’
      • ‘For a long time, central and local governments in Taiwan have fought incessantly over taxes, or a bigger share of the cake.’
      • ‘With profits near record highs Britain's workers have started to ask for a bigger share of the cake and in many cases are getting it.’
      • ‘It was just a matter of dividing the national income cake into more equal slices by means of redistributive taxation.’
  • 2An item of savoury food formed into a flat round shape, and typically baked or fried.

    ‘a starter of goat's cheese and potato cakes’
    • ‘This should be eaten with Paputtu, made with broken rice rava, sprinkled with grated coconut and steamed into a flat cakes cut into diamond shapes.’
    • ‘Then again there was the place where the woman of the house gave you something for the road, such as a cake of bread or a pot of jam and the boss would give you a few shillings to spend on the way home.’
    • ‘Once all the mix is filled, shape them like cakes and shallow fry in vegetable oil or clarified butter until crisp and golden on both sides.’
    • ‘Season, form into six round cakes, and sear on both sides until golden brown, about five minutes.’
    • ‘Kadhi, a savory curry of curds and fried cakes made from pulses, is a popular dish.’
    • ‘Don't confuse suet cakes with similarly shaped seed blocks.’
    • ‘She would make treacle cakes, currant cakes and, of course, she'd make white soda cakes, potato cakes and boxty.’
    • ‘I chose lightly spiced spinach and chickpea potato cake served with basmati rice, mint yoghurt and mango chutney.’
    • ‘Fred's paternal side of the family is German and he suddenly had a hankering for these potato cakes his grandmother made him when he was a child.’
    • ‘To serve, spoon three small amounts of mushroom cake on to warm plate.’
    • ‘These roots were ground, then boiled to make soup or shaped into cakes and stored for later use.’
    • ‘Flake some on a green salad, mix some into a pasta salad, or shape some into salmon cakes.’
    • ‘Your genuine latke is a cake of grated potato and a little onion, bound with an egg and fried in oil.’
    • ‘They do the eggs runny here, which I like, and the potato cake is surprisingly light.’
    • ‘Press spoonfuls of the prawn paste into small patties or flat cakes.’
    1. 2.1 A flattish compact mass of something, especially soap.
      ‘a cake of soap’
      • ‘Taking a complete change of clothes and a cake of soap, I head down to a secluded part of the small river, leaving Marissa to gather wood for our fire.’
      • ‘Come spring the snow compacts under its weight like a fallen cake.’
      • ‘Once a family is ready to spare about two hours, they can easily make as many as 25 soap cakes.’
      • ‘To clean our teeth some of us used a cake of pink cleaner in a round aluminium tin.’
      • ‘Our driver deserves another mention here for the never-ending supply of sticky snowball cakes on our return journey to Munich airport.’
      • ‘She had dropped the cake of soap and bent to retrieve it.’
      • ‘She sprints toward the river's edge, and with a wild and desperate leap, hops onto a cake of ice floating in the river.’
      • ‘The cake was made of lotus root with pellets of chicken, shrimp and pork and invariably tea.’
      • ‘A single careless move and a cake of packed snow skidded away from beneath me.’
      • ‘Here, you get open shelves instead of a wardrobe, white plastic chairs, and a bathroom with a tiny cake of medicinal soap besides a wash-basin the size of a large saucer.’
      • ‘Just as I came upon it I got a flashback of Enrique beading it up with a cake of wax - it happened only minutes ago, I saw him do it!’
      • ‘He then ducked as Ulf chucked a cake of soap at him.’
      • ‘Father used to bring home cakes of ‘Vinolia White Rose’ soap, which had a mild but wonderful fragrance.’
      • ‘Quickly getting in, and grabbing the cake of soap and wash cloth lying nearby I get to work.’
      • ‘We once picked up what looked like a cake of cheese, about a foot in diameter.’
      • ‘They used a mixture of cake gelatine, powdered sugar, food colouring and permitted flavours, to create flat ‘sheets’.’
      • ‘The Neem seed has good demand in Tamil Nadu as its oil extract is used in preparation of soaps, pesticides and medicines while its cake is used to raise horticultural crops.’
      • ‘With careful planning, as the following examples show, you can have your cake of soap and spaciousness too.’
      • ‘These books circulated images of famous paintings, calligraphy and antiquities, as well as designs for such utensils as ink cakes and ink stones.’
      • ‘The fire blazed on the open hearth and sometimes the baker as it was called was hanging over the fire with a cake of bread being baked.’
      bar, tablet
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verb

[with object]
  • 1(of a thick or sticky substance that hardens when dry) cover and become encrusted on (the surface of an object)

    ‘his clothes were caked in mud’
    • ‘His soft leather boots were caked with mud as he pulled them off, and his new canvas smock and pants were heavy with rain.’
    • ‘Wallet's face and clothes were caked with mud but he said he had not given up hope of finding his family.’
    • ‘They were caked in thick grey dust and could only use candlelight and the terrible cries of the injured as their guide.’
    • ‘Glancing out the main window, she could see only a brown haze - the surface was caked with dust.’
    • ‘He stood tall and he looked as though he had stopped traveling for his boots were caked with fresh mud.’
    • ‘She looked down at her own clothes, which were caked with mud.’
    • ‘But, as I walk through here, the mud that is caked and the flotsam and jetsam.’
    • ‘‘I'm Becki,’ said a girl whose hair and clothes were caked in mud and whose hands were clenched into pudgy fists.’
    • ‘Dried blood still caked the back of his hair, making his scalp itch.’
    • ‘Frozen mud is caked on their boots and trousers, evidence of their late night rides.’
    • ‘Penny said: ‘My bike's low to the ground, so I'll be caked in mud when I come out the other end.’’
    • ‘Grae's boots were caked in mud when they finally reached Lake Arath.’
    • ‘His cloak, though black, was badly worn, and his boots were caked in mud.’
    • ‘It didn't look like it had been used in ages, dust and dirt caked the inside, there were even some dead insects in it.’
    • ‘By this time, I was breathing hard, the sweat caking my body.’
    • ‘Dried blood caked the front of the late king's clothes and the broken hand which still clutched his sword.’
    • ‘His display was certainly tidier and more reliable than the mud that was still caking the course yesterday, as the sun dried out the greens, but succeeded only in making the well-trodden walkways reek to high heaven.’
    • ‘‘It was caked in mud all over the roof and it looked like it had been rallying or something,’ he said.’
    • ‘Sweat beaded across his brow and caked his sides under his fatigue shirt.’
    • ‘He was built for speed but at the same time had an elegance that shone even through the dirt caking his lackluster body.’
    cover, coat, encrust, plaster, spread thickly, smother
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object (of a thick or sticky substance) dry or harden into a solid mass.
      ‘the blood under his nose was beginning to cake’
      • ‘They had brown and greenish substance caked on it which was not very appealing to Vaius.’
      • ‘Her blonde hair was beginning to grow black roots and her face had so much foundation and powder caked on that you couldn't see the skin.’
      • ‘The sun streamed through the dust caked on the skylight giving a gray green cast to the empty room.’
      • ‘There was moss and dirt caked into the cracks, but there was a seam of some sort, vaguely in the shape of a rectangle.’
      • ‘I turned the locket over, seeing there was a red substance caked onto the smooth backing.’
      • ‘She could feel the mud caking on her skin and she began to itch all over.’
      • ‘She could barely budge it, she assumed because of all the dirt caked onto it.’
      • ‘It seemed to fit among the spots of dried mud caked on her hand and under her fingernails.’
      • ‘Even still, if the snow does melt, there will be corrosive salt caked on the roads to eat away at me wheels.’
      • ‘His eyes were a dull green color, but that was all that was visible beneath the dirt and blood caked on his face.’
      • ‘The alligator had silvery-white ice caked around its lower body, so it couldn't move.’
      • ‘We dismounted at a final waterfall to wash off some of the dust caked onto our faces.’
      • ‘I always get a ribbing at work when I turn up and my car has mud caked on it up to the windows!’
      • ‘I was afraid that I was going to leave tracks, but luckily the mud caked on the shoes from the other day was gone.’
      • ‘The assortment of dirt and other substances were a permanent fixture on her feet, often caked on by the harsh Egyptian sun.’
      • ‘His arm looked wounded with a bit of dried blood still caked on.’
      • ‘Riders were arriving with red dirt caked on thick to their faces, with specks of dirt attaching themselves to each singular pore and whisker.’
      • ‘I left the battlefield with ancient mud caked to the bottom of my shoes.’
      • ‘The metal glove was cracked and broken, and caked with a dark substance.’
      • ‘He clasped his right arm tightly; red blood caked on a fresh cut.’
      clot, congeal, coagulate, thicken
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Phrases

  • cakes and ale

    • dated Lively enjoyment.

      ‘the gardener's life, as a rule, is not all ‘cakes and ale’’
      • ‘Traditionally celebrated after the main crop had been harvested, Harvest Home was, according to one historian, an annual event characterized by cakes and ale and hang the cost.’
      • ‘Britain once had its days of cakes and ale, and a week which began with a day off.’
      • ‘This is the worst kind of destructive attitude - denying other people cakes and ale because you've never enjoyed them yourself.’
      • ‘And once the world is made virtuous, will there be no more cakes and ale?’
      • ‘The successful physician starves the first ten years, lives on bread and butter the second, and may have cakes and ale the third decade.’
  • you can't have your cake and eat it (too)

    • proverb You can't enjoy both of two desirable but mutually exclusive alternatives.

      ‘the king wanted to have his cake and eat it—to marry Mrs Simpson and to remain on the throne’
      • ‘Who ever said you can't have your cake and eat it lied.’
      • ‘Besides, you can't have your cake and eat it - either the author, and therefore the process of creation, is irrelevant in reader response theory or it isn't.’
      • ‘The theory must sound good to corporate execs, but even in business you can't have your cake and eat it.’
      • ‘As the saying goes, you can't have your cake and eat it.’
      • ‘Apparently they're right you can't have your cake and eat it too.’
      • ‘Well, I'm sorry, you can't have your cake and eat it.’
      • ‘Well as they say, you can't have your cake and eat it too.’
      • ‘My feeling is that you can't have your cake and eat it too.’
      • ‘Pundits say you can't have your cake and eat it too.’
      • ‘I think you have just found out that you can't have your cake and eat it too!’

Origin

Middle English (denoting a small flat bread roll): of Scandinavian origin; related to Swedish kaka and Danish kage.

Pronunciation

cake

/keɪk/