Definition of CAD in English:

CAD

  • 1Computer-aided design.

  • 2Canadian dollar.

Definition of cad in English:

cad

noun

informal, dated
  • A man who behaves dishonourably, especially towards a woman:

    ‘her adulterous cad of a husband’
    • ‘He looked like a schoolboy socialist's dream - the leader of the left whose selfless devotion to democracy exposed his enemies as unprincipled cads.’
    • ‘He was a cad and a bounder, but not without charm.’
    • ‘What turns too many of them into uncouth cads on court?’
    • ‘From the novels she appears to be the sort of woman who appreciates gentlemanly behaviour, but then she also seems to like cads.’
    • ‘We're beggars and blighters and ne'er-do-well cads.’
    • ‘In short, Diplomacy is not a nice game; to win, it is necessary to behave like a complete cad.’
    • ‘For example, I think stable means unchanging or changing slowly, and decent means not a cad or a bounder.’
    • ‘He, true to form, behaves like a cad and leaves her for the gambling tables and his deserved fate.’
    • ‘Britain's biggest cads, rogues and evil-doers from the past 1,000 years have been given special recognition by historians.’
    • ‘My post yesterday about bounders and cads provoked a torrent of commentary and email, so I thought I'd share it with everyone.’
    • ‘Often times these men received the titles of cads and rakes and the like.’
    • ‘In the afternoon I went to the baths but found the water dirty and full of the most dreadful greasy-haired cads.’
    • ‘Far from being the lads or cads as often perceived by society, young and teenage fathers are fighting to support their partners during pregnancy and after birth - but are receiving little or no support from the health services.’
    • ‘But when asked who appealed to them most for short-term affairs, the women turned to the dark heroes - the handsome, passionate and daring cads.’
    • ‘Despite some of the despicable things she's done, we hope she'll find a little transcendence in the world of cads, cowards and creeps that surround her.’
    • ‘He knew, deeply, that in keeping his true identity from her, he had been a cad and a scoundrel, but he had been so eager for her to see him in a positive light.’
    • ‘But the possibility of crossing that line does not mean that alcohol is nothing but a trick employed by cads.’
    • ‘I don't respect all who oppose it since a great many of them seem like ninnies or cads.’
    • ‘It is true, however, that relationships between cads and starry-eyed romantics are rarely what they seem.’
    • ‘Though a nice boy, he acts like a cad when he next meets her.’
    rogue, rascal, good-for-nothing, reprobate, unprincipled person
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 18th century (denoting a passenger picked up by the driver of a horse-drawn coach for personal profit): abbreviation of caddie or cadet.