Definition of bursary in English:

bursary

noun

British
  • 1A grant, especially one awarded to someone to enable them to study at university or college.

    • ‘Mathers came to France as one of 16 university students who won bursaries from the Canadian Battlefields Foundation to study Canada's war history across Europe.’
    • ‘A trust was created in Lahana's name to boost the education of nurses through bursaries, travel grants and awards.’
    • ‘So to help students along, Oxford University is offering bursaries of up to £13,000 to families with low incomes.’
    • ‘Towards the end of this year, the Law Society of Namibia will again be looking for candidates to award bursaries for the study of law.’
    • ‘Students can also get bursaries from English universities to help to cover the cost.’
    • ‘He also insisted there was scope to look at more ways of helping students from poorer backgrounds through bursaries offered by universities.’
    • ‘He hopes bursaries and charitable grants will be available to students who will struggle to meet the costs.’
    • ‘With student loans, grants and bursaries, they pay for their college education.’
    • ‘The awards will each be worth $3,000 per year, making them among the university's top-valued bursaries.’
    • ‘Last year, Patricia McMahon, who attended St Patrick s Community College, was awarded the bursary.’
    • ‘Tessier has been studying religion at Saint Paul University in Ottawa and received a bursary to study English.’
    • ‘Previously the bank only awarded bursaries for studies in banking and related fields, she said.’
    • ‘The company also provides bursaries for university students to take part in paid work programmes during their summer vacations.’
    • ‘Warwick University has been running a similar scheme since last year and last week Oxford University announced a bursary scheme for students from poorer backgrounds worth up to £2,000 over three years.’
    • ‘And regardless of financial plight, many schools award bursaries or grants to the children of parents employed in the armed forces or clergy, or as teachers.’
    • ‘The sponsors of the various scholarships and bursaries then presented special awards to the students.’
    • ‘In addition to this, many students will be able to apply for bursaries from their University (in addition to the maintenance grant) which also will not need to be repaid.’
    • ‘Study in America is open to anyone with five GCSEs at Grade C or above and many universities offer substantial bursaries to those unable to pay the full fees.’
    • ‘The winner received a bursary to enable the study in Rome for three years of the best examples of Antique and Renaissance art while lodging at the French Academy there.’
    • ‘She won a Fulbright Scholarship for studies in America and has been awarded numerous Arts Council bursaries.’
    grant, allowance, endowment, contribution, donation, bursary, gift, present, investment, bestowal, benefaction, allocation, allotment, handout
    View synonyms
  • 2The room of a bursar in a college or school.

    • ‘Please collect a form from the Finance Bursar's Secretary, Lynne Rudman, Room 11 in the Bursary.’

Origin

Late 17th century (in bursary): from medieval Latin bursaria, from bursa bag, purse (see bursa).

Pronunciation:

bursary

/ˈbəːsəri/