Definition of bullock in English:



  • A male domestic bovine animal that has been castrated and is raised for beef.

    • ‘A heavy penalty for cattle over 30 months is commencing to bite into the prices at the marts for finished beef animals - both bullocks and heifers.’
    • ‘In the beef trade, the official returns for last week have shown little change in the average prices for bullocks and heifers, but some low prices are being paid at the bottom of the league for both categories.’
    • ‘Official factory prices for beef last week show there was very little change from the previous week for bullocks or heifers, with just a slight firming of the prices by less than a half penny per lb in most categories.’
    • ‘The punched out bullocks are continuing to sell well while the forward quality bullocks and heifers are also continuing to meet with strong demand.’
    • ‘Fancy prices were paid for heavy beef bullocks.’
    • ‘There was very little difference in the top prices being paid for beef bullocks and heifers at Kilkenny Mart where there were over 1,200 head on offer.’
    • ‘Beef bullocks were up 10 / head and store heifers were dearer by 10-15 / head.’
    • ‘At Kilkenny Mart beef and store bullocks were back by £10 / head for the quality animals with the plainer lots making up to £30 / head less than the previous week.’
    • ‘And they rear bullocks to beef, selling their heifers at around 18 months.’
    • ‘There was also a bigger sale at Bandon Mart yesterday, where the trade for bullocks was maintained, heifer prices improved and dry cows also traded well.’
    • ‘Four girls taking a stroll discovered the bullock and raised the alarm by going to the nearby Tyersal Hall Farm.’
    • ‘A national average of 91.5c/lb was paid for R4L bullocks, while R4L heifers averaged 92.3c/lb.’
    • ‘Blessington heavy beef bullocks with all premia drawn were improved by 40-50 / head.’
    • ‘The decline in prices for bullocks and heifers eased with the mean for R4L down 5c/kg.’
    • ‘It was in such buildings, cluttered with farm implements, that Alf would operate on large animals or test unruly bullocks for TB.’
    • ‘There was further upward movement in beef prices at factories last week, particularly in the return for poorer grading animals and more in favour of heifers than bullocks.’
    • ‘Lower throughput did not ease the pace of price reduction, which was maintained, with a further 1p/lb knocked off the average paid for R3 bullocks and heifers.’
    • ‘Camels, elephants and regular drought animals like the bullocks also are brought on to roads to draw the attention of voters.’
    • ‘They brought with them 350 ewes, 45 wethers, ten bullocks, six heifers, one bull, four horses, and a number of goats and some poultry.’
    • ‘The intake of bullocks at the beef factories to date is down 8% - a drop of 36,000.’


[NO OBJECT]Australian, NZ
  • Work long and hard.

    ‘people have dropped dead bullocking their guts out’
    • ‘A man of untiring energy, he "bullocked" along.’
    • ‘if you take a selector who has bullocked all his life to raise crops on dusty, stony patches in the scrubs, and put him on land where there's plenty of water and manure, he's apt to get disheartened.’
    work hard, labour, work one's fingers to the bone, work like a trojan, work like a dog, work day and night, exert oneself, keep at it, keep one's nose to the grindstone, grind away, slave away, grub away, plough away, plod away
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Late Old English bulluc, diminutive of bula (see bull). The verb ( late 19th century) is by association with a bullock's use as a draught animal.