Definition of Bulgar in English:

Bulgar

noun

  • A member of a Slavic people who settled in what is now Bulgaria in the 7th century.

    [as modifier] ‘a Bulgar shepherd’
    • ‘In this book Malcolm Todd covers an admirable range of peoples on the move, from the Celts around 500 BC to the nomadic Avars and Bulgars in eastern Europe in the 7th century AD.’
    • ‘His cruelty won him the name of Bulgaroctonus, Slayer of the Bulgars.’
    • ‘Moravians, Bulgars, Croato-Serbians, and Poles all sought to overthrow the Avars, but their power was not broken until Charlemagne appeared.’
    • ‘Greeks, Romans, Huns, and Bulgars invaded the area, which in the 13 th century became part of the Mongol empire.’
    • ‘In 922, the Tatars' predecessors, the Bulgars, converted to Islam, and the old Turkic script was replaced by the Arabic alphabet.’
    • ‘He preached a crusade against John Asen of Bulgaria, granting extensive privileges to King Bela IV of Hungary to get him to make war on the Bulgars, but the Mongols were arriving and the Hungarians had to fight them instead.’
    • ‘Some time after the middle of the seventh century, the Bulgars, a people of Hunnic and Finnic stock, who had been driven from their habitations on the Volga as far as the Lower Danube, began to make incursions into Moesia and Thrace.’
    • ‘Some historical accounts indicate that in the ninth century, during the reign of Bulgar Tzar Boris I, Jews attempted to convert the Bulgars to Judaism, but the attempt failed as Christianity became more widespread.’
    • ‘The triple line of fortifications constructed on the land side in the fifth century had held off attacks by Goths, Persians, Avars, Bulgars, Russians, and especially Arabs.’
    • ‘It is the home of various people including Albanians, Vlachs, Greeks, Serbs, Bulgars, and Turks.’
    • ‘A century later, Bulgars, a Turco-Ugrian people of remote Mongolian origin, invaded and were assimilated by the Slavs.’
    • ‘Thus, in his Commentary on Matthew's Gospel, Christian of Stablo shows awareness of the respective conversions of the Bulgars and the Khazars to Christianity and Judaism in the 860s.’
    • ‘In 568, the Lombards under their king, Alboin, raised an army in Pannonia that also included Gepids, Suebians, Sarmatians, Bulgars, Saxons, Roman provincials, and others.’
    • ‘In the seventh century, they joined with invading Bulgars to gain control of a sizable territory, which they defended against Byzantium in 681, gaining recognition as the first Bulgarian state.’
    • ‘In the ninth century, Orthodox missions from Constantinople converted the Bulgars, Serbs and Slavs, tribes who had invaded and settled the Balkan provinces some 200 years before.’
    • ‘In command of most of the Balkans and northern Greece, John Asen now began to call himself Emperor of the Bulgars and the Greeks.’
    • ‘When the Bulgars rebelled again, Alexius was unable to control them.’
    • ‘And thus Asparukh founded a state of Slavs and Bulgars, binding his tribe with the tribal alliance of the seven Slavic tribes and the Severians.’
    • ‘February 1207, Henry marries Agnes, daughter of Boniface of Montferrat. Summer, Boniface is killed in a skirmish with Bulgars.’
    • ‘Almost two centuries later, the Bulgars, a Turkic tribe from central Asia, began their conquest of the region.’

Origin

From medieval Latin Bulgarus, from Old Church Slavonic Blŭgarinŭ.

Pronunciation:

Bulgar

/ˈbʌlɡə/

Definition of bulgar in English:

bulgar

(also bulgar wheat, bulgur)

noun

  • [mass noun] A cereal food made from whole wheat partially boiled then dried, eaten especially in Turkey.

    [as modifier] ‘bulgar wheat’
    • ‘Kubbeh are bulgar dumplings filled with lamb meat and spices.’
    • ‘Research also shows whole grains, like whole-wheat bread, brown rice and bulgur, make weight control easier when they're a regular part of your diet because they're high in fiber.’
    • ‘The Tabouleh salad is another favourite, made with totally fresh ingredients - bulgur wheat, tomatoes, onion, plenty of olive oil, lemon juice and parsley.’
    • ‘For example, if you like the chewiness and nutty flavor of brown rice, consider trying other grains, such as barley, quinoa, bulgur wheat or wild rice.’
    • ‘Couscous (pronounced koos-koos) is processed wheat similar to bulgar but with a finer texture and flavor.’
    • ‘Add bulgur wheat, salt to taste and broth; bring to a boil.’
    • ‘The bulgur wheat and the chick pea-spice mixture are bagged separately, as are chili flakes and a leathery side of fruit chutney.’
    • ‘Combine the lamb with the bulgur wheat, onion and seasonings and form into patties by taking a piece of mixture the size of a golf ball and gently patting it into small, oval, sausage-like shapes around wooden skewers.’
    • ‘You can buy bulgar wheat (also known as cracked wheat) at most supermarkets these days.’
    • ‘A few whole grains you should add to your diet include brown and wild rice, barley, oats, kasha, quinoa, bulgur and buckwheat.’
    • ‘These foods top the list (in order of magnesium content): bulgur wheat, sunflower seeds, tofu, almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, white beans, broccoli, artichokes, and milk.’
    • ‘A typical noon meal consists of vegetable and meat stew with a side dish of rice or bulgar pilaf and salad, with fruit for desert.’
    • ‘Experiment with brown rice, barley, whole-wheat pasta and bulgur.’
    • ‘The grain with it, farika, is akin to kasha or bulgar wheat.’
    • ‘Eat whole grain crackers and side dishes such as bulgur wheat.’
    • ‘Wheat and by-products of wheat can be included in almost any food, so cooks need to keep an eye open for key ingredient words such as bran, bulgar, germ, gluten, malt, starch, durum, farina, graham, semolina and even modified food starch.’
    • ‘Grains and beans, such as barley, lentils, peas, beans, bulgur, whole wheat, etc., are great sources of complex carbohydrates.’
    • ‘These include the glutens present in all forms of wheat, including durum, semolina, spelt, kamut, malt, couscous, bulgar, triticale, einkorn, and faro, as well as in related grains - rye and barley.’
    • ‘Combine cooked bulgur wheat with chopped parsley, scallions and olive oil, or add raisins, dried apricots and minced basil to brown rice.’
    • ‘The Turks are practically alone among Asian pilaf-makers in using fish and shellfish in pilaf, and, like their immediate neighbours the Syrians and Armenians, often make pilaf using bulgur wheat instead of rice.’

Origin

1930s: from Turkish bulgur bruised grain.

Pronunciation:

bulgar

/ˈbʌlɡə/