Main definitions of bud in English

: bud1bud2

bud1

noun

  • 1A compact knob-like growth on a plant which develops into a leaf, flower, or shoot.

    • ‘Leaf discs and the unpollinated pistils of unopened flower buds from both the control and HTS-treated plants were also collected for total RNA extraction.’
    • ‘The newly emerged adults feed on young leaves and flower buds.’
    • ‘Flower buds develop in leaf nodes in the upper part of the flowering shoot.’
    • ‘Burbank studied life at its fountain head - in the marvelous little buds and shoots and leaves that burgeon forth each spring to fill us anew with the awe for nature.’
    • ‘New leaves and flower buds develop before Christmas and usually open in January and, depending on the severity of the winter, by February it has formed a clump of blooms and foliage.’
    • ‘Take off side shoots and flower buds and cut large leaves in half to reduce water loss.’
    • ‘The ratio between the number of leaf and flower primordia per bud varied with shoot type.’
    • ‘The new winter flowering pansies seemed to be raring to go when we planted them on Sunday and are already showing signs of leaf growth and new flower buds.’
    • ‘Flower buds and leaves were collected from flowering plants in each population and stored in zipper sealed plastic bags on ice.’
    • ‘Aphids also tend to like tender shoots and flower buds as these organs have a lot of phloem transport; this causes bud loss and fewer new leaves.’
    • ‘After a rain, its barren, gray-black stems change overnight to green as small leaves emerge from buds covering the plant.’
    • ‘In shoots, strong CHL1 expression is found in young leaves and developing flower buds.’
    • ‘When the plants flowered, buds of different developmental stages were removed from the main inflorescence and the petals were dissected from the flower bud under a binocular microscope.’
    • ‘Flower meristem, flower buds, and leaves from green and 2 d-etiolated plants were analysed for ATP and ADP contents.’
    • ‘Spent flower blooms and affected buds, leaves or stems should be removed when plants are dry.’
    • ‘In addition, they have four or five scaly leaves with lateral buds on their epicotyl.’
    • ‘After 48 days of growth, the number of flowers, buds, and seed pods on each plant was counted as a measure of the total flower number.’
    • ‘Sampson is also looking at ways to control the blueberry gall midge, a fly that attacks the flower and leaf buds of blueberry plants.’
    • ‘The leafy stems, bearing terminal preformed flower buds, sprout from the underground tuberous roots in early spring.’
    • ‘Quail typically hunt for seeds, grain, grasses, plant leaves and buds, acorns, and insects.’
    sprout, shoot, flowerlet, floret
    plumule
    burgeon
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Biology An outgrowth from an organism, e.g. a yeast cell, that separates to form a new individual without sexual reproduction taking place.
      • ‘Moreover, in flocculent strains such as 1278b it is difficult to distinguish between two adherent cells and a cell with a large bud.’
      • ‘The next day 30-50 cells containing small buds were micromanipulated to isolated areas of the plate.’
      • ‘Cells with a small bud or tiny projections were observed.’
      • ‘Careful examination of serial sections failed to ascertain the presence of true meristematic cells in these atrophied buds.’
      • ‘At this point, 60% of the cells had large buds that continued to elongate with prolonged incubation.’
    2. 1.2Zoology [with modifier] A rudimentary leg or other appendage of an animal which has not yet grown, or never will grow, to full size:
      ‘in certain limbless lizards and snakes a limb bud develops’
      • ‘Around the 8th week after conception, oval-shaped tooth buds consisting of cells form in the embryo.’
      • ‘This probably reflects the presence of stem cells in the nail bud rather than cell dedifferentiation.’
      • ‘At this time the limb bud can undergo as much as a three-fold increase in size.’
      • ‘At the time of tooth bud formation, each tooth begins a continuous movement outward in relation to the bone.’
      • ‘During the embryonic stage, the tonsils arise from the second pharyngeal pouch as buds of endodermal cells.’
  • 2US informal [mass noun] Cannabis:

    ‘I found him outside, smoking some bud’
    • ‘The Aussies were smoking high-quality B.C. bud and waxing their snowboards with hydrocarbon Swix and a clothes iron.’
    • ‘Very relaxing and ultra potent, the smoke from this legal bud is sure to impress ANY herbal toker.’
    • ‘These drugs were alcohol, marijuana (including "regular" and high-potency marijuana or "bud"), and ecstasy (a recreational drug, the use of which peaked during the time of this study).’
    • ‘Meanwhile, bud has been demonized, criminalized, and the drug war has been industrialized.’
    • ‘Contrary to what the media hype over "BC Bud" would have the public believe, the vast majority of marijuana imported into the U.S. comes from Mexico.’
    • ‘Unlike anything else legally available today, this bud is ultra potent.’
    • ‘I eventually and begrudgingly passed it on, but only once the burning bud had been smoked to ash.’
    • ‘They must have some killer bud.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]Biology
  • 1 (of a plant or animal) form a bud:

    ‘new blood vessels bud out from the vascular bed’
    • ‘In the absence of growth inhibition cells are smaller and follow the normal axial budding pattern of haploid cells, in which new cells bud adjacent to the previous site of cytokinesis.’
    • ‘Spring growth was budding on the shrubs around the front porch, the weather vane atop one of the turrets facing out to the lake.’
    • ‘At one point the temperature was up to 11C; nature has been knocked out of kilter, with adders emerging from hibernation and plants budding.’
    • ‘It buds late and therefore avoids devastation by most spring frosts but is an irregular yielder.’
    • ‘Moreover, tetraploid cells do not bud or show abnormal mitotic spindles when placed in water.’
    • ‘Mitochondria are dynamic structures, constantly changing shape, budding and fusing.’
    • ‘The virion of MuLV classifies it as a C-type virus, which assembles at the surface of infected cells, and acquires a plasma membrane envelope as it buds from a cell.’
    • ‘No harm will come to your rose if it has already started to bud up and grow and you prune it back during that stage.’
    • ‘One effect is that flowers are now budding 19 days earlier as spring moves forwards.’
    • ‘When the limits of the substrate have been reached, a Hydractinia colony will bud reproductive polyps called gonozooids from the stolonal mat.’
    • ‘The squirrels and the chipmunks frolicked in the interlacing tree branches that budded with new life.’
    • ‘Spring has come to Shanghai and we can again see flowers blooming and trees budding.’
    • ‘Many of the carpets use flowers and wheels, both suggestive of a cyclical life: flowers bud, bloom, and then die, and their beauty is only ephemeral.’
    • ‘Egg chambers bud off from the germarium, although they are abnormal.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, bulbs and seeds sprout, trees bud, and insects emerge and start consuming the tender foliage.’
    • ‘Additionally, the coil has bioactive properties to promote healing of the aneurysm ‘neck’ where it buds from the blood vessel.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, corals bud on, and both their sexual and asexual activities provide evidence of reproductive success and hybrid forms that continue to puzzle geneticists.’
    • ‘Inland, willows are budding and azaleas are blooming.’
    • ‘The tips of these aerial hyphae swell to form a vesicle, and layers of cells bud off of the vesicle.’
    • ‘A dancer's career is in any case as brief as that of a spring flower - it buds, it blooms, it fades, leaving behind just the fleet fragrance of memories.’
    sprout, shoot, develop buds, form buds, send out shoots, germinate, burgeon, swell, vegetate, mature
    pullulate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object] Graft a bud of (a plant) on to another plant.
      • ‘Most roses are budded onto a hardy rootstock, so there will be a ‘neck’ that's about 4 inches long just above the roots.’
      • ‘It is something of a myth that only roses that have been budded on to a rootstock by a nurseryman will grow.’
      • ‘Most plants that were imported from France and Israel, were budded onto Rosa indica major (referred to as ‘Indica’) selections.’
      • ‘Rather than having been budded onto a rootstock, shrublets grow on their own roots, making these plants less susceptible to the ravages of winter.’
      • ‘The most vulnerable point on most rose plants is the bud union - the point at which the rose variety was budded onto a rootstock.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

bud

/bʌd/

Main definitions of bud in English

: bud1bud2

bud2

noun

North American
informal
  • A friendly form of address from one boy or man to another:

    ‘I'll tell you what, bud’
    • ‘‘Because she's as head over heels as you are, bud,’ James answered.’
    • ‘That's a very interesting theory there, bud.’
    • ‘He dragged his bags past us, and giving a distasteful look at me said, ‘Want some advice, bud?’’
    • ‘I've only got enough Spaghettio's for my family, bud.’
    • ‘But I can still give you a run for your money, bud.’
    • ‘Well, I'll tell ya, bud, until you find yourself a prince who will take you away from all this, it's not about you.’
    • ‘And don't bring up Liz again tonight, all right, bud?’
    • ‘Not verbally, but I could just tell, it was a feeling, bud.’
    • ‘Ariela smiled slyly, ‘Thanks, bud,’ she said and ran towards it.’
    • ‘They just wanted to get together for one more night and bid my son farewell - to say, ‘We love you, bud, and we're going to miss you.’’

Origin

Mid 19th century: abbreviation of buddy.

Pronunciation:

bud

/bʌd/