Definition of buckskin in English:

buckskin

noun

  • 1The skin of a male deer.

    ‘she knelt on a buckskin’
    • ‘Outside one actor's tent on Saturday, a buckskin was stretched out to dry.’
    • ‘Armed with modern weapons, those Creeks involved in the buckskin trade became more efficient and successful in attaining deer.’
    • ‘On the American frontier, buckskins were often used as units of commerce.’
    • ‘Brain tanned buckskin has always been the material of choice for people living in the outdoors, and for good reason. It is washable, proof against thorns, cuts the wind, allows your skin to breathe, lasts a lifetime and yet is incredibly soft and comfortable.’
    • ‘The meat of buffalo and deer was a source of food, while the hides provided rawhide and buckskins for teepee covers, blankets, clothes and parfleches.’
    1. 1.1[mass noun]Greyish leather with a suede finish, traditionally made from buckskin but now often made from sheepskin.
      [as modifier] ‘a pair of buckskin moccasins’
      • ‘When she pulled a rifle, covered with a buckskin cloth off her saddle, Darren watched her with curiosity.’
      • ‘Here he gained a wide audience for his work and became a striking public figure with his blond hair, buckskin shirt, and characteristic red sash.’
      • ‘The array of historical treasures range from a butterfly kachina to a buckskin dress.’
      • ‘These were carrying bags made of buckskin or rawhide and were used to carry clothing, food and all the little objects that the people accumulated.’
      • ‘The gift shop at the Jicarilla museum provides an outlet for the sale of locally crafted Jicarilla traditional items, including basketry, beadwork, feather work, and finely tanned buckskin leather.’
      • ‘He wears a buckskin coat, Wellington boots, and a hat with a rolled brim.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, Woodrow Wilson preferred white buckskin shoes in size 9 and Warren Harding wore spats representative of the Victorian era.’
      • ‘In an apparent attempt to reclaim the Indian identity that caused his beloved to reject him, he emerges from the house dressed in an unbuttoned buckskin shirt and headdress, with a blanket around his waist.’
      • ‘A climactic event of that period was Custer's Last Stand at Little Big Horn in 1876, so of course the exhibit includes the buckskin coat that George A. Custer sometimes wore.’
      • ‘Others roamed the bivouac sporting buckskin clothing and moccasins rifled from the camp.’
      • ‘Then he turned to Plummer and asked him to take custody of the buckskin sack.’
      • ‘Southern Paiute men and women reportedly wore twined-bark leggings and Northern Paiute men wore simple buckskin shirts.’
      • ‘He was dressed in leggings and a buckskin shirt.’
      • ‘The term ‘white-shoe’ originally referred to elite college men who wore white buckskin shoes in the 1950s at Ivy League schools.’
      • ‘Calamity Jane was also a well-known character when she lurched into Deadwood wearing buckskin trousers and a fringed jacket in the summer of 1876.’
      • ‘Scottsdale is a ‘Western’ town, in the sense of fringed buckskin outfits, ornately tooled boots, and as much silver and turquoise on the tack as on the cowgirls.’
      • ‘With his large white Stetson, red shirt, fringed buckskin jacket and large black boots I recognized him immediately as Buffalo Bill himself.’
      • ‘They had no intentions of conforming to frontier stereotypes by living in primitive log cabins and wearing buckskin clothing.’
      • ‘The heavy .44 slugs ripped apart the buckskin shirt and the hair and hat fell away from the wood it had covered.’
      • ‘West, a Southern Cheyenne chief, says the buckskin shirt he wears to powwows has a connection to the animal it came from.’
    2. 1.2Clothes or shoes made from buckskin leather.
      ‘the Great Plainsman wore fringed buckskins’
      • ‘Croft, sober in his tweed hunting jacket, tan buckskins and black, white-topped boots, grinned and went up to his friend.’
      • ‘As with the Williams rendition, Cody is again dressed in buckskins instead of his vaquero outfit.’
      • ‘In the months after they've wintered at Fort Mandan, their European clothing is starting to wear out and they are transitioning to buckskins.’
      • ‘In contrast to how they are portrayed in existing artwork, the men made great efforts to maintain their issue uniforms rather than abandon them for buckskins and coonskin caps.’
      • ‘That ‘mythos’ still lives, although the buckskins have been traded in for pinstripes.’
      • ‘Women, including the suburb's mayor, strode about in period dresses and bonnets, men in buckskins or colorful military uniforms of the day.’
    3. 1.3[mass noun]Thick, smooth cotton or woollen fabric.
      [as modifier] ‘buckskin cloth’
  • 2North American A horse of a greyish-yellow colour.

    [as modifier] ‘the buckskin mare stumbled’
    • ‘A buckskin gelding horse snorted as he stumbled down the trench to be with its master.’
    • ‘She used Arcadia to block Biscuit from escaping and re-captured the buckskin's lead.’
    • ‘The nobleman motioned for Ryan to mount the buckskin, which he did with slight difficulty.’
    • ‘You are the owner of the buckskin thoroughbred stallion Manic Panic, are you not?’
    • ‘The three sat down on the edge of the trailer, as the buckskin came trotting up looking for treats.’
    • ‘As Black Blaze reared and screamed, Angel faced a young man atop a buckskin horse.’
    • ‘Feeling as if all eyes were on him, he approached the horse that Aarao had instructed was his, a young buckskin stallion that had apparently had no owner before him.’
    • ‘Gustav, though, would have learned little from the post's most famous survivor-a buckskin gelding named Comanche.’
    • ‘Ben slung his saddlebags over the big buckskin's saddle.’
    • ‘She was a buckskin mare, noticeably taller than the horses surrounding her.’
    • ‘A whinny from a buckskin horse eating the grass beside the trail made her smile.’
    • ‘We didn't sleep in Shadow's stall, we slept in the empty one, by Teddy, a buckskin gelding.’
    • ‘He jumped off of his beast, a beautiful buckskin, and patted it on the rump.’
    • ‘I rode closer to an older man riding a buckskin gelding.’
    • ‘They came to rest on a buckskin gelding lazily chewing on hay.’
    • ‘Ben had swung into his saddle and pulled the buckskin around to follow his sons and the buckboard out of the yard when he heard it: a half strangled yelp followed swiftly by what was obviously drawers opening and then slamming shut.’
    • ‘The plucky 12-year-old rider and her trusty 15-year-old buckskin gelding weren't about to let opportunity escape them this year.’
    • ‘Sullivan took his buckskin mare's reins and ran a fond hand over the animal's forehead as he eyed the roan.’
    • ‘A buckskin stallion, though his coat was not a dusty pale hue, but a vibrant gold, standing about sixteen hands tall and with the most intelligent eyes that had long since captured the boy's admiration.’
    • ‘The great buckskin horse was nibbling at the shoulder of the guard's tunic, his shining black eyes shifting between his master and Fionnabhair.’

Pronunciation:

buckskin

/ˈbʌkskɪn/