Main definitions of buck in English

: buck1buck2buck3

buck1

noun

  • 1The male of some horned animals, especially the fallow deer, roe deer, reindeer, and antelopes.

    • ‘In other words, the owners of the buck deer in Edgar were held as much to the standards of the owner of a domestic animal as that of a wild animal owner.’
    • ‘And it has particularly infuriated park managers because the owner of an Alsatian watched as her dog chased the buck and then fled the scene while the deer died.’
    • ‘In central Iowa, purebred bucks and does cost $500 or more per animal.’
    • ‘When, freezing and exhausted, he finally felt land beneath his limbs, the buck collapsed.’
    • ‘I saw a beautiful dark-horned buck standing with a doe on a sun-splashed, frost-sparkled flat near the edge of a canyon.’
    • ‘They require no hanging, and the meat is pale and tender; that of does is considered better than that of bucks (males).’
    • ‘The double trigger setup on the Mountain Rifle allows for a quick shot by simply pulling the front trigger should a whitetail buck break cover in front of the hunter.’
    • ‘Outdoors enthusiasts who can ignore the season's monster bucks and swarming quail will find excellent largemouth bass action.’
    • ‘They'd seen three roe deer in the woods, a hind and two bucks, moving ‘silent and in slow motion through the snow’.’
    • ‘On the drive back to Shelby a big buck deer jumped across the road only a few yards in front of us.’
    • ‘Herein, we consider two main hypotheses to assess the possible function of the post-copulatory vocalization of fallow bucks.’
    • ‘The most magnificent of these was a buck's head - antlers and all - which was mounted above the fireplace.’
    • ‘Add a host of maturing bucks from a bumper fawn crop six years ago and the potential for trophy-class deer is excellent.’
    • ‘Growth of an organ, such as a buck's antlers, requires additional nourishment and that means additional blood flow.’
    • ‘Hunters selectively cull the does to make more forage available for the bucks.’
    • ‘Some places base the cost of a deer hunt on the size of a buck's antlers - the bigger the antlers, the more the hunt costs.’
    • ‘Even at the tail end of the season, we were seeing numerous herds of 20 or more antelope marshaled by some very fine quality herd bucks.’
    • ‘In a year as magical as this one, impressive bucks are scattered throughout the state, but those animals won't be easy to see just now.’
    • ‘They had red skin, and small horns like a buck's newly sprouting antlers.’
    • ‘Just about 15 minutes ago, we're told a white deer - a white buck - was tranquilized and is now being brought for medical treatment.’
    1. 1.1A male hare, rabbit, ferret, rat, or kangaroo.
      • ‘During my North Cotswold Mastership, I made Butler, the terrier man, carry a huge white buck ferret on his bicycle, and very useful he proved to be.’
      • ‘Marion had never got on with her father, but right now if she saw his face she'd have cheerfully swung the three strong buck rabbits she was carrying into it.’
      • ‘Buck hares are wild frolickers in March, their breeding season, which has made them a synonym for lunacy for centuries.’
      • ‘John, as mentioned at the outset, had two dogs that were almost drowned by a wild buck kangaroo when it took them on in a small reservoir on his family's property.’
    2. 1.2South African An antelope of either sex.
      • ‘A huge buck with elaborate antlers was dangerously close.’
      • ‘In the north we then saw full-up jumping goats, brick buck, bald buck, camel horses and also more cats.’
      • ‘The Johannesburg Zoo is proud to announce the birth, over the New Year, of four baby bucks.’
      • ‘Animals on the farm include wildebeest, zebra, giraffe and numerous types of buck.’
      • ‘Apart from a long list of game in the park which includes giraffe, zebra, hippos, warthogs and a large variety of buck, the park is home to thousands of cycads of all sorts and sizes.’
  • 2

    another term for vaulting horse
    • ‘No work on the buck is presented here because so few gymnasia are equipped with this apparatus.’
    • ‘In the States years ago and long before anyone ever heard of adjustable cables, a small version of the vaulting horse was called the buck.’
    • ‘We would be made to do all the usual humiliating routines of trying to climb the ropes, balance on beams, hang upside down on the wall bars and on occasion, vault over a ‘horse’ or ‘buck’.’
  • 3A vertical jump performed by a horse, with the head lowered, back arched, and back legs thrown out behind.

    ‘the horse seemed to leap, making a mighty buck that shipped the rider off’
    • ‘The black horse gave a hard buck and finally managed to dislodge his rider who flew through the air and then finally hit the ground with a loud crunch and then she lay there motionless.’
    • ‘Every so often she would give a little buck, rear or jump.’
    • ‘Quinn's horse went into a gallop, followed by a small buck.’
    • ‘I plunged into a rage of bucks, kicks, rears, jumps, and twists.’
    • ‘About 10 minutes into the lesson he did one of his handstand bucks and sent me flying towards the floor.’
  • 4archaic A fashionable and spirited young man.

    ‘the dashing young buck, driving his own equipage’
    • ‘When the boss is gone, the young bucks want to move up and take over.’
    • ‘Too many old heads and too many young bucks not having had the time to cut their teeth properly.’
    • ‘He's both the wise man and the young buck trying to prove himself.’
    • ‘That old cliche of a blend of young bucks and seasoned campaigners was there in abundance.’
    • ‘For many of the young bucks in their scarlet tunics, what starts as a great imperial adventure ends in either a squalid death or captivity.’

verb

  • 1[no object] (of a horse) to perform a buck.

    ‘he's got to get his head down to buck’
    [with object] ‘she bucked them off if they tried to get on her back’
    • ‘Proper dental care has eliminated dangerous behaviors such as bolting, flipping over backwards, and bucking in a number of my clients' horses.’
    • ‘Yes, I rode a horse, got bucked off and that was the last time I will ever get near a horse.’
    • ‘The horse was small, but it was sturdy, and it suddenly started bucking and plunging in a manner that would have done a bronco proud.’
    • ‘Suddenly he began to buck, throwing me around like a rag doll.’
    • ‘Ben's horse was bucking and Ben was hanging on tight so he wouldn't get thrown.’
    • ‘There were no horses bucking in their stalls, no chickens clucking on the ground.’
    • ‘Lopez dislocated a shoulder when his mount, Quoit Alarming, bucked and unseated him during the first race at Monmouth Park on September 11.’
    • ‘The Parker boy had broken his arm when he was bucked off a horse.’
    • ‘The young stallion was bucking and rearing, trying to get the man off his back.’
    • ‘Her horse reared, its eyes rimmed with white as it bolted away, the other three riderless horses bucked until their tethers snapped and galloped after it.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the horse bucked and she was thrown to the ground.’
    • ‘The startled horse bucked again and let out a whinny as the rider held tight to the reigns and tugged back.’
    • ‘The gelding had almost bucked her off several times, and all we had done was walk and trot.’
    • ‘His hair stood on end, as if he'd been running his hands through it; ink stained one finger; and he had the wild-eyed look of a horse about to start bucking.’
    • ‘In order for a horse to buck, it has to lower its head and slow its pace to bring both hind legs together and underneath to gain enough power to push upwards.’
    • ‘When the horse bucks you, you pick yourself up, dust yourself off and get right back on.’
    • ‘Sarah mounted a horse and it bucked, throwing her into the air.’
    • ‘Croft's horse bucked; Croft tugged on the reins and backed away.’
    • ‘She was about to lead the three-year-old in from the paddock when another horse in the yard unsettled him and he bucked, kicking Blanche under the jaw and knocking her unconscious.’
    • ‘Suddenly, his horse bucked and Henry nearly fell off.’
    1. 1.1(of a vehicle) make sudden jerky movements.
      ‘the boat began to buck in the water’
      • ‘At that moment the ship bucked and smashed over to one side.’
      • ‘The boat bucked and spun and entered the rapids.’
      • ‘The rafts bucked under us, bobbing and tilting.’
      • ‘The tall ship bucked hard to the side, then back down again.’
      • ‘He forgot his musing when the Blue Horizon banked to the starboard and then suddenly bucked upward.’
      • ‘The vessel bucked and swerved as the upper atmosphere began to tug and grab at the smooth underside of the glider-car.’
      • ‘The truck bucked violently as the shock wave slammed against it, and Ian was pelted with small stones and dust, first from behind, then a split second later from the opposite direction.’
      • ‘I couldn't avoid them all, and the ship bucked and heaved under me as more rocks than I would like to count peppered our outer hull.’
      • ‘But then the ship bucked as missiles rained from above.’
      • ‘A few seconds later and the car began to buck and slide out of control.’
      • ‘The ship shuddered and bucked but no damage was taken.’
      • ‘As the current funnels through a gauntlet of rhino-sized rocks, our pair of six-metre rafts plunge and buck like paper cups in a storm drain.’
      • ‘I could feel the ship trembling and bucking while Maura tried to keep it under control.’
      • ‘The raft bucked to one side, and for one terrible moment it seemed that it would spill all the way over.’
      • ‘As the bullets chewed through the surface each helicopter bucked as it took the weight of the shell, and Paul uttered a brief murmur to himself as their car accelerated toward the gate, hoping the helicopters could take the load.’
      • ‘An instant later several more bursts of fire followed, and the ship bucked into the air and then smashed back down, its landing struts sheering off completely.’
      • ‘It also takes a great deal of leg strength for explosive sprints on the flat sections, and a great deal of upper body strength just to control the bike as it bucks under you.’
      • ‘As I pushed the bike closer to the limit a problem emerged: even though the suspension was working as hard as it could, the bike began to buck beneath me.’
      • ‘Diving into turn one at over 120 mph, the rough track had the bike bucking around some.’
      • ‘The first hundred yards of the tunnel were the worst - the road was heavily cratered, and our vehicles bucked and shuddered wildly, spraying snowmelt into the blackness.’
  • 2[with object] Oppose or resist (something oppressive or inevitable)

    ‘the shares bucked the market trend’
    • ‘But whenever coaches buck conventional wisdom, they face intense scrutiny from reporters and fans.’
    • ‘Which means now is the perfect time to buck the trend and get in while the market is at a pricing low.’
    • ‘The outgoing chief executive still believes you cannot buck the market.’
    • ‘But, as I explained here and especially here, the stock market is bucking some fairly powerful deflationary currents, in both the the U.S. and the global economies.’
    • ‘But Keighley is bucking the trend, especially by maintaining engineering manufacturing levels, in contrast to the slump in manufacturing in the rest of the country over the period of the Labour Government.’
    • ‘Scottish Equity Partners, the Glasgow-based independent venture capital company, is bucking the market trend by expanding both its Glasgow and London offices.’
    • ‘So, does it make more sense to bet on gold shares to start bucking this trend again - or is it better to jump on the bandwagon and do as the Chinese do?’
    • ‘However, the one market niche bucking the downward trend this year has been that catering for first-time buyers.’
    • ‘European bourses ended the week in the red yesterday, but the Irish market bucked the trend managing to stay ahead throughout the day's trading.’
    • ‘But despite the market hurdles they face, some small brewers are bucking the trend.’
    • ‘It closed its first day of trading at 37 cents a share and has bucked a trend afflicting other new listings by rising to 41 cents as of the April 12 market close.’
    • ‘Three debutants on Hong Kong bourses bucked the general market trend yesterday that saw the Hang Seng Index plunge for a second day to end down 1.5 per cent.’
    • ‘However sales of MG models were up 10% to 9,540 - bucking the market trend which saw overall sales down by more than 7%.’
    • ‘Prices at the top end of the central-London market continue to rise slightly, bucking the national trend.’
    • ‘But Dunloe's share price has bucked the trend, up 39% since January 1 and up by 65% over the year.’
    • ‘But Google, until today, surprised many by bucking the market trends for so long.’
    • ‘In those ten years the research centre had helped Smith and Nephew to become much more profitable and has grown in stature - and in share price which bucked the recent downward stock market trend to end 2.5 times higher than a decade ago.’
    • ‘While the number of people participating in more traditional forms of organised sport continues to decline, this trend is being bucked in dramatic style by the level of interest in the many new events that veer from the mainstream.’
    • ‘This must be what they meant by not bucking the market.’
    • ‘The gold shares bucked the general trend today and closed on or near their highs with the South Africans firmer due to the softening rand.’
    resist, oppose, contradict, defy, go against, kick against
    View synonyms
  • 3informal Make or become more cheerful.

    [with object] ‘Bella and Jim need me to buck them up’
    [no object] ‘buck up, kid, it's not the end of the game’
    • ‘He has at last loftily declared his extremely qualified support for Charlie - providing the laddie bucks up.’
    • ‘The Japanese data bucks up the yen against the dollar and the Euro specially, after the poor US data and also not much better data coming forth from Europe.’
    • ‘A new, comfortingly rich deal with EMI bucked them up no end, apparently.’
    • ‘Much worse may yet come to trouble Airdrie as they scramble to safeguard their long-term future, but they will not have top-tier football to help them, barring a bucking up of form on their part and a bit more bungling by the men from Maryhill.’
    • ‘So even though I bucked up as the evening went on and the air cleared, it's been a less than pleasant day.’
    • ‘I think that they're going to be bucked up and encouraged by Senator Kerry's performance tonight, and I think they'll be more energy on the Democratic side.’
    • ‘On a psychic level, he used his own comeback as the example that gave Sammy the strength to return to performing, bucking him up every day and making one-eye jokes that somehow took the curse off Sammy's disability.’
    • ‘She then proceeded to say that I should stop sponging off other people and start bucking up.’
    • ‘What he was doing was, I think, trying to buck me up so that when I went in to this principal's meeting I was sufficiently on-guard against the kind of bureaucratic inertia that he had fought all of his life.’
    • ‘So I shall have a look at the tonics on offer and perhaps get her something to try and buck her up a bit.’
    • ‘When Villanova was down 12 points early in the second half on Feb.13, the team could depend on more than 20,000 fans at the Wachovia Center to buck them up.’
    • ‘It's a good test again for us and hopefully it will buck us up for the next five or six weeks.’
    • ‘The cartoons are little morality plays aimed at bucking up the national will, putting steel in the spine, gently guiding the reluctant towards their duties.’
    • ‘Our spirits were bucked up a little by seeing a third work stashed away behind a wall called Square, a video piece that documented people having their photos taken in Tiananmen Square.’
    • ‘And I have come to suspect that all my efforts are acting as a bracing tonic to the weeds, bucking them up nicely, and aerating the soil for their growing pleasure.’
    • ‘Whenever anyone felt down, she would buck them up with cheery word.’
    • ‘And instead of bucking up and marketing myself to new clients, instead of choosing to view this ‘challenge’ as an ‘opportunity’ like I'd been taught in so many motivational seminars, I chose to complain.’
    • ‘He bucks you up and tutors you and guides you and mentors you.’
    • ‘He visited the far-flung corners of his empire, bucking up his troops but also stamping out incipient rebellions.’
    • ‘We're hoping to get a bit of gardening in tomorrow and, if so, the fresh air and gentle exercise will buck me up no end.’
    cheer up, brighten up, buoy up, ginger up, perk up, rally, animate, invigorate, hearten, uplift, encourage, stimulate, enliven, make someone happier, raise someone's spirits, give someone a lift
    pep up
    inspirit
    cheer up, perk up, take heart, rally, pick up, bounce back
    View synonyms

adjective

US
military slang
  • Lowest of a particular rank.

    ‘a buck private’
    • ‘Like the old buck sergeant he is, Shipley hurried them off to the appropriate ticket agent.’
    • ‘I was a buck private, private first class, sergeant, staff sergeant, first sergeant, and then I became a second lieutenant.’
    • ‘Pat Reid was buck private to begin with and, even though he was in charge of an important group, he remained a buck private until the day he left Spain.’
    • ‘In 1954, I became a Ph.D. in mathematics and a buck private in the Army.’

Phrases

  • buck up one's ideas

    • informal Become more serious, energetic, and hard-working.

      ‘she wouldn't have a job, she realized, if she didn't buck up her ideas’
      • ‘Arsene Wenger's side will have to buck up their ideas away from home, although the striking form of Thierry Henry will at least give them hope of scoring in any destination.’
      • ‘The goal breathed much-needed life into Scotland but it also resulted in the US bucking up their ideas.’
      • ‘The retailers may see it as a one-off bumper windfall, but the government is distinctly less impressed and hopes the naming and shaming campaign will cause shops to buck up their ideas.’
      • ‘The fact that in future it will cost airlines money if they overbook or cancel flights should force them to buck up their ideas and put passengers first.’
      • ‘Todd gave Windass and Andy Cooke 15 minutes after the break to buck up their ideas following a disappointing first half.’
      • ‘England bucked up their ideas after the break and capitalised on the Slovaks’ tiring before a late rally in which they almost sneaked an equaliser in the dying seconds.’
      • ‘Moone bucked up their ideas at the start of the second half and two goals from Sean Higgins had Moone back in the match.’
      • ‘And although the season is just 90 minutes old, he would rather not be having to hand out warnings to two of his new signings that, if they don't buck up their ideas, they will soon be out of the team.’
      • ‘I think we all need to buck up our ideas a bit and concentrate on what we can do.’
      • ‘Pickering Town boss Jimmy Reid has issued a stark warning to his players - buck up your ideas or lose your place.’

Origin

Old English, partly from buc ‘male deer’ (of Germanic origin, related to Dutch bok and German Bock); reinforced by bucca ‘male goat’, of the same ultimate origin.

Pronunciation:

buck

/bʌk/

Main definitions of buck in English

: buck1buck2buck3

buck2

noun

Australian, North american, NZ
informal
  • 1A dollar.

    ‘a run-down hotel room for five bucks a night’
    • ‘Can you imagine paying 47 bucks to watch skateboarding?’
    • ‘This is a bit of a side note but five bucks says the town of Greenville isn't green at all.’
    • ‘They claim they're going to save a few hundred million bucks in the deal.’
    • ‘If you don't want a full meal, you can get roti bread with satay sauce for five bucks.’
    • ‘I just bought a Liz Claiborne sweater at Goodwill for five bucks.’
    • ‘The girl gave him a whole fifty bucks and received three dollars change.’
    • ‘Now, how could he turn a few bucks out of this deal?’
    • ‘They will get a $2,500 pay increase, and they will get to keep five bucks.’
    • ‘Maybe just two bucks for a soda or five bucks for a beer, but that's still money I don't have.’
    • ‘Surely they would have no problem forking out a few extra bucks for a DVD player.’
    • ‘It was only about 8 euros, which is about US 10 bucks.’
    • ‘Sure, you can stay home, save a few bucks and see the game on TV, but what's the fun in that?’
    • ‘They range in price from several dollars to around twenty-five bucks.’
    • ‘It's a $20.00 registration plus Green fees of about five bucks.’
    • ‘Pay me five thousand bucks and I'll speak at your corporate function.’
    • ‘I was sitting at the bar, having a couple of quiet ones with a bloke I know only distantly, when a voice behind me said ‘Lend us five bucks.’’
    • ‘Spree somehow convinced the Knicks to reduce his fine from 150,000 dollars to just 2,500 bucks…’
    • ‘I know, but it's just five bucks, and at this point I'm almost eager to give it to him.’
    • ‘Men in business suits would leave me a buck on a fifty dollar tab.’
    • ‘I saved up and bought it at the local pawnshop for seventy-five bucks, a deal as far as I was concerned.’
    1. 1.1South African A rand.
      • ‘I'd love to subscribe, but it costs nearly a thousand bucks with our meagre currency!’
      • ‘This weekend I watched the live lotto draw and wondered what the winner of 10 million bucks would be doing with their cash.’
      • ‘I don't think I won a million bucks, I think I earned it the hard way.’
      • ‘Terrible, terrible movie, waste of 20 bucks, wish I could go back in time and kick myself for choosing to watch that.’
      • ‘I have a cake to make for an 8-year-old's birthday, by order, which will bring in a few bucks on Friday.’
    2. 1.2Indian A rupee.
      • ‘But today, since the auto driver demanded 35 bucks, I decided to walk.’
      • ‘There were more than the expected number of guests and I had to arrange for tea and samosas for them and that cost 90 bucks.’
      • ‘Most of the children earn a few bucks by begging or trash-picking.’
      • ‘Reflecting on the days when he struggled to make a few bucks, Muthukad feels that he has come a long way from the days when he used to set aside money for his return trip soon after reaching the place for his performance.’
      • ‘Chai in the mall costs 15 bucks and paani puris were Rs. 20 for 5.’

Phrases

  • big bucks

    • A lot of money.

      ‘the fast-track man who gets promoted regularly and brings home big bucks every week’
      • ‘And big publishers definitely want to make big bucks out of the kiddie segment.’
      • ‘That's what your boss gets the big bucks for, so pass it on.’
      • ‘She figured she was already in the money so why not take a shot at the big bucks.’
      • ‘With big bucks shaping the industry, the emphasis shifts from drugs that cure to those that sell.’
      • ‘The world's best women tennis players gather to compete for big bucks.’
      • ‘It's a lot of pressure but the players know that and they get paid big bucks, so they have to put up with it - as long as it's not physical violence.’
      • ‘And the fans have paid big bucks to see this fight, and nothing is happening.’
      • ‘Free speech is of limited value when freedom to be heard requires big bucks.’
      • ‘It's easy for some people to go out and drop the big bucks on a bottle of wine, and up to a certain point, you generally get what you pay for.’
      • ‘We're going to show you why some bold thieves may not be making big bucks off their amazing heist.’
  • a fast (or quick) buck

    • Easily and quickly earned money.

      ‘itinerant traders out to make a fast buck’
      • ‘But the facts speak for themselves - people are still out there in the dark risking their lives in pursuit of a quick buck.’
      • ‘Investors saw an opportunity in snapping up new houses and apartments, seeing the opportunity for a quick buck as rents climbed sharply.’
      • ‘I don't want to be forced into earning a quick buck.’
      • ‘What shocked them the second time was his avid pursuit of a quick buck through a share deal.’
      • ‘These funds are not the domain of speculative, sophisticated individuals who put their money in for a quick buck.’
      • ‘Many people think that the book industry is just another racket out to make a quick buck by inflating prices and preying on readers' desire for good, cheap books.’
      • ‘Sydney's harbour and many iconic sites are up for grabs because of the senseless pursuit of a fast buck, writes Paul Keating.’
      • ‘Senior executives believe investors will be carried away by exaggerated advertising and cash in on their pensions and homes in the hope of making a fast buck.’
      • ‘However, analysts say there is no such thing as a quick buck to be earned in America and investors should be taking at least a 10-year view.’
      • ‘I do understand that times can be difficult for galleries and that they have to make money and the fast buck is tempting.’
      • ‘This is true because with poverty levels now at more than 80 per cent temptations for citizens to earn a quick buck become much harder to resist.’
      • ‘Those who became landlords fairly recently, to make a fast buck from rising house prices, are most likely to panic.’
      • ‘Plus, by sending our troops, we get to earn a quick buck on the side.’
      • ‘Perhaps he has never visited tourist attractions in the capital and elsewhere and seen the vendors of ice cream and hot dogs making a fast buck at the expense of tourists.’
      • ‘Ultimately the show celebrates friendship, and the extraordinary lengths these ordinary men will go to earn a fast buck and restore pride in their lives.’
      • ‘Governments hoping to earn a fast buck by switching off analogue television transmitters and selling the frequencies to cellphone operators are in for a shock.’
      • ‘For the new government elite, it is a place to make a fast buck from reclaimed farms and misdirected aid money.’
      • ‘The chance of earning a fast buck has given birth to a thriving souvenir industry on the streets around, selling stuff that ranges from the sympathetic to the sick.’
      • ‘No one would dispute the need to stop farmers attempting to evade planning regulations and make a fast buck by building expensive homes on green field sites.’
      • ‘I urged everybody not to aim for the quick buck because any money you get will be slowly cancelled out by increased insurance premiums for almost everything!’

Origin

Mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

buck

/bʌk/

Main definitions of buck in English

: buck1buck2buck3

buck3

noun

  • An article placed as a reminder in front of a player whose turn it is to deal at poker.

    • ‘In Texas Hold 'Em a plastic puck or a buck (a silver dollar) rotates around the table to signify the dealer.’
    • ‘Poker and politics have often been intertwined. Harry Truman had his own presidential poker chips, and the "buck" which stopped at his desk is also from the game.’
    • ‘The "dealer" for a given hand will hold the dealer button, or buck. When the hand is completed, the button is passed to the player on the left.’

Phrases

  • the buck stops here (or with someone)

    • informal The responsibility for something cannot or should not be passed to someone else.

      ‘in the past you could spread the blame, but now the buck stops here’
      • ‘Surely the public is entitled to know, because the buck stops here, where the votes are.’
      • ‘‘The controllers are all highly trained and they will handle all the aircraft passing through our airspace but, ultimately I am the general manager so the buck stops here’, he said.’
      • ‘‘Since we provide the funding and oversight for the agency, the buck stops here,’ said Mr. Hollings.’
      • ‘He's also willing, more often than not, to stand up and do a Harry Truman, take positions, and say the buck stops here.’
      • ‘Nor has he shown any inclination to properly organize his economic troops, or to deal with the fact that the buck stops with the chief executive.’
      • ‘‘I'm the compliance officer, so you're right, the buck stops here in the end,’ she said.’
      • ‘He hasn't taken a leadership role to say, ‘Yes, the buck stops here.’’
      • ‘When the buck stops here - when you're responsible for the ultimate shareholder value - you've got to take 10 or 30 or 100 variables into consideration.’
      • ‘Those people that are trying to shift focus should realize what Harry Truman said a long time ago, the buck stops here.’
      • ‘We are all to blame tonight, but I signed the players and I suppose the buck stops with me.’
  • pass the buck

    • informal Shift the responsibility for something to someone else.

      ‘elected political leaders cannot pass the buck for crisis decisions to any alternative source of authority’
      • ‘Have you ever noticed, ironically, that the folks who spend so much time talking about ‘responsibility’ are usually the first to try to pass the buck?’
      • ‘What is especially telling is the depiction of a bureaucracy unable to react, passing the buck and avoiding responsibility.’
      • ‘The government can pass the buck to companies, and workers can abdicate all responsibility.’
      • ‘Instead they have been engaged in the old game of passing the buck, and shifting all blame onto the civil service.’
      • ‘It seems to me that it is far easier to pass the buck than to take personal responsibility for our own actions.’
      • ‘But have any so breezily dodged responsibility and so glibly passed the buck?’
      • ‘It seems as if government departments are playing games with us, passing the buck from one minister to another.’
      • ‘I don't know if it's been chief and council passing the buck or the co-manager passing the buck.’
      • ‘This is unfair and shows that a hidden tax is often a devious tax, especially when the Government passes the buck to local councils and then disclaims all responsibility for what is going on.’
      • ‘It seems they keep on passing the buck - no one wants to accept responsibility.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

buck

/bʌk/