Definition of brutally in English:

brutally

adverb

  • 1In a savagely violent way.

    ‘he was imprisoned and brutally tortured’
    ‘he brutally murdered an innocent man’
    • ‘He enters, and finds two people brutally murdered.’
    • ‘Against a backdrop of political intrigue, police corruption, and her own tortured history, she brutally exacts her revenge.’
    • ‘Acting on his own desperation, he begins to brutally beat Jamie.’
    • ‘In not one case has the government acted to support those who've been brutally oppressed.’
    • ‘The independence of domestic prosecutors and judges is questionable when a dictatorial regime has reigned brutally and for so long.’
    • ‘He is plagued by a series of surreal hallucinations in which his father is brutally tortured.’
    • ‘In 1888, in the Whitechapel District of London, someone is brutally murdering prostitutes.’
    • ‘Though no one resisted arrest, police brutally threw the protesters to the floor and handcuffed them.’
    • ‘The demonstrators in the restricted area were brutally beaten and arrested by the military police.’
    • ‘His window looks out at a schoolboy being brutally arrested.’
    1. 1.1as submodifier In a direct way that does not attempt to disguise unpleasantness.
      ‘she was unapologetic and brutally honest’
      ‘a brutally candid interview’
      • ‘The film has won accolades for being both brutally honest and very funny.’
      • ‘He is a potentially fascinating character, charming, brutally insensitive, fun-loving and more of a child than any of his children.’
      • ‘The film's brutally unromantic conception of religion is summed up in this one scene.’
      • ‘I remember the movie's brutally accurate depiction of the rough South.’
      • ‘The dance series was inspired by the work of Gorey, that darkly mischievous and brutally perceptive illustrator.’
      • ‘He and his friends indeed are brutally unfeeling at best and hateful at worst.’
      • ‘It is hard to be brutally critical of this DVD beyond mockery and a good-natured ribbing.’
      • ‘The brutally direct communications engendered by youthful, student audiences tend to endear them to dancers.’
      • ‘Her art is less brutally frank, but no less provocative.’
      • ‘In the public eye, he was brutally forthright, never more so than on Face to Face.’
    2. 1.2as submodifier To an extremely unpleasant or harsh degree.
      ‘weeks of brutally cold weather’
      ‘a brutally competitive market’
      • ‘The predominance of industrial labor has to a large extent been replaced by the service sector in a brutally rapid transformation.’
      • ‘It's the brutally bizarre nature of their relationship that holds one's interest.’
      • ‘With brutally unforgiving winters, and summers of drought and fist-sized hailstones, these states practically beg travelers to keep on moving.’
      • ‘An extreme and brutally clear case of differentiation by civic status appears in a 5th-century law-code published in southern Crete.’
      • ‘In the 18th century, this 'rule of law' was often brutally apparent.’
      • ‘What I propose is a brutally mathematical system that nonetheless would be pretty straightforward.’
      • ‘It is a brutally devastating story of an old woman forced to live out her days with haunting memories of her past as she monitors a men's bathroom.’
      • ‘Arriving on a brutally cold morning in April, I found her preoccupied with getting her gallery installations ready for a crowd of collectors.’
      • ‘Firefighters faced brutally hot, dangerously dry conditions as they battled a wildfire outside Palm Springs.’
      • ‘The soundtrack becomes brutally tedious after 20 minutes or so.’

Pronunciation

brutally

/ˈbruːt(ə)li/