Main definitions of brogue in English

: brogue1brogue2

brogue1

noun

  • 1A strong outdoor shoe with ornamental perforated patterns in the leather.

    • ‘It seems Patsy has forgotten to change his boots, and is still wearing his work brogues!’
    • ‘The first was a fine gold Tissot, bequeathed to me by my Uncle Harold, along with a venerable pair of tan brogues.’
    • ‘In fact, Gilbert seems more upset when a mugger robs him of his favourite pair of brogues.’
    • ‘Men expect to see the return of the pointy-toe brogues with a thick leather sole, as well as the Chelsea boot to polish your mod style.’
    • ‘Where once ballet slippers, car shoes, moccasins and brogues were once boringly themselves, now they've somehow interbred, jollied up and produced a new generation of lightened-up fashion ideas.’
    • ‘At family gatherings Vik is always immaculately groomed: blazer, brogues, wavy hair-sprayed coiffure.’
    • ‘She kept her hair short, wore men's tailored suits and brogues.’
    • ‘Brendan Howlin: get a woolly hat, warm coat, mittens and stout brogues to keep him warm in the gulags.’
    • ‘Big brogues aren't exactly a high-fashion footwear item these days, but then neither are those tawdry tan shoes with tacky pink shoelaces!’
    • ‘Other accessories include beards and sideburns (confirming that hairy faces are back) and for your feet there's desert boots, brogues and Chelsea boots for extra comfy rambling.’
    • ‘He stood outside, briskly polishing the insteps of his brogues.’
    • ‘Finding out that nobody wants high quality hand-stitched brogues anymore, Charlie realises that a change of product is needed.’
    • ‘If you had called into my humble newsagent to instruct me in person I could have licked your brogues and sent my youngest out with a chamois leather to wash your Range Rover.’
    • ‘They run a shoe shop, which is a front for a drugs operation, with Angela delivering the ‘goods’ inside pairs of stilettos and brogues, seemingly unnoticed by the local constabulary.’
    • ‘Of course, doffing my hobnailed leather brogues for a bit of fresh air in the middle of the aerodrome probably didn't endear me to the locals.’
    • ‘Expecting a Gaelic romp in the woods, Judge George Hatch bought a brand new pair of brogues.’
    • ‘He eschews the uniform of the boardroom boss, preferring sports jackets and casual boots to the traditional Savile Row suit and handmade brogues.’
    • ‘Boris's black brogues look in need of re-soling.’
    • ‘That morning he rose at sunrise and stepped into trousers and brogues in the tea-colored light.’
    • ‘Shoes are now considered to be one of, if not the most important part of an outfit, be they stilettos, brogues, cowboy boots or sneakers.’
    1. 1.1A rough shoe of untanned leather, formerly worn in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.

Origin

Late 16th century: from Scottish Gaelic and Irish bróg, from Old Norse brók (related to breech).

Pronunciation:

brogue

/brəʊɡ/

Main definitions of brogue in English

: brogue1brogue2

brogue2

noun

  • A marked accent, especially Irish or Scottish, when speaking English.

    ‘a fine Irish brogue’
    [mass noun] ‘a sweet lilt of brogue in her voice’
    • ‘‘First, I want you to bring out that blasted trash out of here,’ he said in his Irish brogue as he pointed at Manda.’
    • ‘‘Quite possibly,’ a red-haired man with an Irish brogue said.’
    • ‘She still had her Irish brogue and could dance with the best of them.’
    • ‘A father to two sons and the keeper of a large but modest house, he speaks as little as possible - his voice reveals him as among the first generation to lose its Irish brogue.’
    • ‘An Irish brogue greeted him but menace tainted his welcome.’
    • ‘Right from the outset, even if you ignored his Irish brogue, when you hear that he was born in Limerick, you would know he is Irish - and that's the Republic of Ireland he hastened to tell me.’
    • ‘He was born in Chicago in 1958 to immigrant parents; as the New York Times notes, his Irish brogue can be summoned depending on the occasion.’
    • ‘Irish people speak English with an accent known as a brogue.’
    • ‘Instead of requiring the actor to disguise it, the director forces every other performer essaying a Greek or Macedonian role to have an Irish brogue.’
    • ‘Higgins, a small stout woman who usually speaks in a booming Irish brogue, nods silently.’
    • ‘He may have a Dublin brogue and a very Irish sense of humour, but Mark Geary has found his home, and Ireland is not it.’
    • ‘The Irish brogue became more pronounced as the voice became more panic-stricken.’
    • ‘Her mother was white Irish, and while she was clearly of African descent, Lydia spoke with an Irish brogue and carried herself like a fine white lady, as her white Irish grandmother had raised her to do.’
    • ‘I heard my mum on the other end, her Irish brogue more noticeable than when I had left.’
    • ‘She saw him turn to a Lord near him, his Irish brogue fainter than it had been years before due to years of tutoring under English professors.’
    • ‘For example, as he grew drunker in the final act, he began to slip back into the Irish brogue that he told us he had worked so hard to erase.’
    • ‘It seemed to be a mix between the English accent and the Irish brogue.’
    • ‘The use of exaggerated dialect in ‘Down Shamrock Alley’ as representation of the Irish brogue helps to satirize and parody the new ethnic community of the Irish.’
    • ‘Instead of the melodious tones of an Irish brogue, the exaggerated drawl of an angry young man spat from the earpiece.’
    • ‘Several witnesses related the story of that operation, usually with an Irish brogue to enhance the color of Madden's bravado.’
    pronunciation, intonation, enunciation, elocution, articulation, inflection, tone, modulation, cadence, timbre, utterance, manner of speaking, speech pattern, speech, diction, delivery
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century: perhaps allusively from brogue, referring to the rough footwear of Irish peasants.

Pronunciation:

brogue

/brəʊɡ/