Definition of broadsheet in English:

broadsheet

noun

  • 1A large piece of paper printed with information on one side only.

    ‘I have sent you a broadsheet which surveys our campaigns’
    • ‘In the past it was books, broadsheets and pamphlets that changed how people think.’
    • ‘These regulations did not prevent the production of broadsheets and pamphlets, particularly of a puritan bent.’
    • ‘Out in the wider world, public opinion stirred, especially in the cities, stimulated by the pamphlets and broadsheets which printing made possible.’
    • ‘When people did comics as broadsheets in the 1800s, they were as full of information as any painting.’
    • ‘We chatted over drinks and then studied the new menus which are hard to miss - tall and narrow, like a broadsheet paper folded lengthwise.’
    • ‘D&P has cards, flyers, a video and a broadsheet packed with useful information to be used in the campaign and to inform Canadians.’
    • ‘Instead we are going out onto the estates as quickly as possible, putting the arguments and producing leaflets and a broadsheet carrying the arguments.’
    • ‘The pages in Skuodas's books resemble broadsheets, and are rich in textural effects that include handwoven strips of painted or translucent paper.’
    • ‘Between 1560 and 1603 he issued a multitude of broadsheets and small volumes in verse and prose, several containing autobiographical pieces and notices of current events.’
    • ‘As a young man he wrote words to popular folk airs and had them printed as broadsheets.’
    • ‘He talks about the class interests that spawned the early pamphlets and broadsheets and those who did their best to censor and destroy them.’
    • ‘War Game combines simple water colour illustrations with photomontage reproductions of wartime recruiting posters, broadsheets, advertisements, and the like.’
    information sheet, bill, handbill, poster, advertisement, announcement, bulletin, circular, flyer, leaflet, pamphlet, sign, placard
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    1. 1.1 A newspaper with a large format, regarded as more serious and less sensationalist than tabloids.
      ‘the tabloidization of the broadsheets’
      • ‘Even the opinion polls published in the broadsheet papers showed very strong views on the Rapid Reaction Force and the need to preserve neutrality.’
      • ‘Here's a gripping tale about Lesley Dalton, of York, who wrote this letter to a national broadsheet newspaper this week.’
      • ‘Shortly afterwards the Guardian, a British broadsheet newspaper, published the obituary of Cohn Osman, founder of Creative Camera.’
      • ‘They're not going to make a decision and say, ‘Oh look, I'm going to go to a website instead of going to my broadsheet newspaper.’’
      • ‘Do you compare Radio Scotland to a broadsheet newspaper or a tabloid?’
      • ‘And its interesting because I went on to the Observer, which is a broadsheet newspaper, and very respectable, and for a very short time in the late 70s I was Woman's Editor.’
      • ‘The week ending September 16 saw circulation increases for most papers, and all broadsheets.’
      • ‘Al is a pundit for a broadsheet newspaper and is paid to find imperfection in everything; Davina works in an art gallery and is paid to make life more beautiful.’
      • ‘The broadsheet newspaper's circulation advanced 3.5 per cent to an all-time high of 120,397 in the July to December period, according to the latest audited circulation figures.’
      • ‘Anyone who reads a broadsheet newspaper will be familiar with the issues covered by Julie Black's recent programme, ‘My Foetus’.’
      • ‘It's entertainment, not a broadsheet paper.’
      • ‘Next time you pick up a broadsheet paper, look at all the tripe that falls out of it: cars, clothes, restaurants and the hundreds of ads that power these supplements.’
      • ‘On the balance, we don't see students consuming either magazines or national broadsheets for information.’
      • ‘The fact that your article last week on unsatisfactory new-build housing filled an entire page of a broadsheet newspaper and the word ‘architect’ did not appear once speaks volumes.’
      • ‘Reports say the conservative broadsheet will run nine pages of news a day.’
      • ‘In all the London-based papers - six daily broadsheets, and four magazines the tone has been remarkably consistent.’
      • ‘When I'm abroad, I miss having a decent broadsheet newspaper.’
      • ‘Both the political and social-class designations no longer seem appropriate, and the resizing of broadsheets will undoubtedly add to the difficulty of deciding which paper serves a given audience.’
      • ‘The next day the broadsheets printed special editions with huge double-page spreads showing the havoc in Manhattan.’
      • ‘Leander wrote intelligent pieces for a broadsheet under a male pseudonym.’
      newspaper, paper, tabloid, journal, periodical, weekly, organ, news-sheet, newsletter, bulletin
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Pronunciation

broadsheet

/ˈbrɔːdʃiːt/