Definition of broadcast in English:

broadcast

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Transmit (a programme or some information) by radio or television:

    ‘the announcement was broadcast live’
    ‘the state monopoly on broadcasting’
    • ‘BBC Radio Cleveland will be broadcasting a special show live from Stockton's Kingdom of Ice.’
    • ‘Television programmes broadcast debates between pro- and anti-democracy analysts.’
    • ‘That is what public service broadcasting means.’
    • ‘A week of programmes recorded at this year's St Magnus Festival were broadcast on Radio 3 this week.’
    • ‘Ofcom will update the TV industry on its plans for regional broadcasting when it delivers the final phase of its review of public service broadcasting next month.’
    • ‘The event was broadcast live on government-run television and radio stations.’
    • ‘The awards ceremony was broadcast live on television throughout Europe, England, and in parts of Russia.’
    • ‘Last year's event was broadcast live on national television.’
    • ‘So you broadcast the live episode and then went immediately on to record the second?’
    • ‘For now, she savors that special day when color faded into the background and a homecoming queen's parade was broadcast live on national television for two hours.’
    • ‘The military ceremony that followed was broadcast live on Spanish television.’
    • ‘The funeral ceremony was broadcast live on all television channels, which replaced scheduled programs with recitations from the Koran.’
    • ‘Both a case of better the old devil you know, as BBC staff believe both men have the keenest sense of what the BBC is or should be, to remain close to its public service broadcasting roots.’
    • ‘The match was broadcast live on national television and radio.’
    • ‘A similar lawsuit has recently been launched over the issue of re - broadcasting television programs over the Internet.’
    • ‘NASA Television will broadcast the event live, one day after the arrival of the Expedition 7 crew aboard the Station.’
    • ‘BBC World Service broadcasts programmes around the world in 43 languages and has a global audience of 149 million listeners.’
    • ‘For the first time, digital satellite viewers will be able to opt into a live interactive forum as soon as a programme has been broadcast.’
    • ‘It lines up a popular music star or group and has them perform before a small audience, broadcasting the event live on television.’
    • ‘Latin America's largest private university will also broadcast programmes via their internet site.’
    transmit, relay, air, beam, put out, send out, put on the air, put on the airwaves, show, screen, televise, telecast, videocast, podcast, live-stream
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    1. 1.1[no object] Take part in a radio or television transmission:
      ‘they regularly broadcast on Radio 2’
      • ‘Infamously, the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra do not broadcast on Radio Scotland.’
      • ‘That's what KPIG has been doing since it became the first commercial radio station ever to broadcast on the Web.’
      • ‘According to Agus, a television station which broadcasts 20 hours a day needs at least 7,500 to 8,000 hours of programming annually.’
      • ‘This new deal will enable the station to broadcast on five frequencies a total of 25 hours a week of BBC programming.’
      • ‘The station, likely to broadcast on its original frequency, 87.9FM, will be based in the town centre.’
      • ‘The station will broadcast on 107 FM, right up there near the top of the FM band.’
      • ‘It was the UK's first pirate radio station to broadcast 24 hours a day.’
      • ‘You also broadcast on radio, so let me ask you, are your readers, are your viewers, are your listeners still interested in this trial?’
      • ‘Mr Allen, 52, was 17 and the second voice ever to broadcast on the station in 1969.’
      • ‘The Goons first broadcast on the Home Service on 28 May 1951, initially titled Crazy People.’
      • ‘She has also broadcast on the radio in France, Romania and Switzerland.’
      • ‘Claremorris Community Radio will broadcast on Saturday and Sunday from 10 am until 9pm, at which stage they will break for the Christmas.’
      • ‘Kpig was the first commercial radio station to broadcast on the Web, and it has blazed trails ever since.’
      • ‘Aimee McPherson was the first woman to broadcast on the radio in North America.’
      utter, give, make, read, recite, give voice to, voice, speak, declaim
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    2. 1.2 Tell (something) to many people:
      ‘we don't want to broadcast our unhappiness to the world’
      • ‘The correspondence was regularly posted on a web site, broadcasting the ineptitude of this spammer to the world.’
      • ‘Sometimes we don't even have to open our mouths to broadcast our outsider status and offend the locals.’
      • ‘Again, this is probably not the place to broadcast my feelings publicly, much rather say it to you on the phone, through a text or in person.’
      report, announce, publicize, publish, make public, make known, advertise, proclaim, declare
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  • 2Scatter (seeds) by hand or machine rather than placing in drills or rows:

    ‘the second method is to broadcast the seeds together with not more than 1 kg to the acre of rapeseed’
    • ‘They can be broadcast or spread over lawns and ground covers, or dug or raked into soil around the root zones of trees, shrubs, and perennials.’
    • ‘Another satisfactory method is to broadcast the seed followed by a shallow disking or harrowing and cultipacking.’
    • ‘Pregerminated seeds are broadcast by hand on the puddled soils, and some farms apply chemicals or natural herbs to control snails.’
    • ‘If these seeds are broadcast, strive for a uniform stand by sowing half the seeds in one direction, then sowing the remaining seed at a right angle to the first.’
    • ‘On our farm, we broadcast the hay seed into winter wheat in late winter or early spring and let the freezing and thawing action of the soil pull the seed into the ground.’
    • ‘This year, those who drilled oats seemed to do better than those who broadcast seed.’
    • ‘This may be done by broadcasting seed and depending on freezing, thawing, and cattle trampling to cover the seed.’
    • ‘Seeds should be broadcast in the fall or early spring in well-drained sandy soil that has been well spaded or raked.’
    • ‘When he does replant, he'll let the plants go to seed or, for small areas or new varieties, he'll broadcast the seed himself.’
    • ‘Drilling is recommended because it requires less seed than broadcasting and is usually more successful.’
    • ‘On a commercial scale, some crops may require a seed-planting drill, but you can broadcast most seed and then incorporate it with a disc pulled by a tractor.’
    • ‘The seeds can also be broadcast in wide rows 8-10 inches apart.’
    • ‘We broadcast 100 seeds of each of the four species in 4 m × 30 cm experimental plots.’
    • ‘Uniformly broadcast the seed, then repeat in a perpendicular direction.’
    • ‘On conventionally prepared seedbeds, brassica seed can be broadcast and incorporated with cultipacking.’
    • ‘Nitrogen and potassium should not be placed in direct contact with the seed, but should be broadcast.’
    • ‘Sometimes seeds were simply broadcast in the wind over barren areas.’
    • ‘Apply the carbon in a band under the plants, rather than broadcast, so that only one-quarter to one-third of the 900 pounds is needed.’
    • ‘For a natural look the first year, broadcast half the seeds over the desired area, then sow the remainder in a direction perpendicular to the first.’
    • ‘Seed is broadcast or drilled on the pastures in late winter or early spring.’
    scatter, sow, disperse, sprinkle, spread, distribute, disseminate, strew, throw, toss, fling
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noun

  • A radio or television programme or transmission:

    ‘the Queen's annual Christmas TV broadcast’
    • ‘Princess Elizabeth spent most of the war years at Windsor Castle and made her first radio broadcast on October 13, 1940, at the age of 14, on Children's Hour.’
    • ‘Highlights will be broadcast during a mammoth seven-hour broadcast on Radio 1 the following night.’
    • ‘Seychellois radio and television broadcasts offer programs in Creole, English, and French.’
    • ‘One was an obscure broadcast on Abu Dhabi television, which mysteriously managed to receive huge prominence in Britain.’
    • ‘Television and radio broadcasts are only a small part of the field of meteorology.’
    • ‘Government offices, schools and most of the banks were closed by the strike, and health services and radio and television broadcasts were minimal.’
    • ‘Our radio and television broadcasts have been leaking into space since the 1930s, when the first powerful emitters were constructed.’
    • ‘Unlike radio and television music broadcasts, the government could not control what people chose to play on their own private cassette players.’
    • ‘St Joseph's Church in Callow was the venue for the Mid-West Radio Mass broadcast on Sunday, 25 January.’
    • ‘Radio and television broadcasts usually criticize the current legal situation and show sympathy for patients who are being threatened by criminal procedures.’
    • ‘Most of the people sitting at the bar were cheering on the sports team broadcast on the television, and mainly being sold drink after drink.’
    • ‘The Town Report broadcast on Midlands Radio was another great development for Rosenallis last year.’
    • ‘In particular, the funding that is provided for television and radio broadcasts is paid out on a proportionate basis - the larger the party, the more money it gets and the more time it gets.’
    • ‘He admitted in a nationwide radio broadcast on Friday that he is addicted to prescription pain medication.’
    • ‘Andorrans receive both television and radio broadcasts from neighboring countries.’
    • ‘This is clearly borne out in Just for Fun, a program broadcast by Cameroon Radio and Television.’
    • ‘Most Senegalese radio and television broadcasts are in French, but some are in Wolof.’
    • ‘There are radio and television broadcasts in Arabic and other languages.’
    • ‘A broadcast on the radio this morning gave me cause to have a little laugh.’
    • ‘Bush was forced to respond in his weekly national radio broadcast on Sunday to fears that the body count could rise dramatically.’
    programme, show, production, presentation, performance
    transmission, telecast, videocast, podcast
    screening, prog
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adjective

  • Relating to radio or television programmes:

    ‘a broadcast journalist’
    • ‘I think broadcast journalism by and large does not do a very good job.’
    • ‘What gave Shaw the impression that the law accords print and broadcast journalists the same rights?’
    • ‘The same costs potentially face publishing firms and broadcasting companies every time they decide to fight a complex libel case.’
    • ‘It will also look at the various roles in radio from broadcast law to programming and will even include studio visits for hands-on training.’
    • ‘And what should be the standards in prime-time broadcast television.’
    • ‘Nobody expects broadcast journalists to be medical experts.’
    • ‘Joining us from New York, the dean of American broadcast journalists, Walter Cronkite.’
    • ‘Whether it has a public broadcasting policy, or a media policy itself, so that it can feel it is included in the dealings of the country.’
    • ‘The effort is to harness the latent talent in the country in TV production, broadcast journalism and media management.’
    • ‘First, I hold a three-year diploma in print and broadcast journalism from Conestoga College.’
    • ‘With broadcast television, the relevant journalistic question is one of survival.’
    • ‘One more component: the journalism and communications program funneling journalists into broadcast media.’
    • ‘I just wanted to say I admire your work you're your professionalism that you bring to broadcast journalism.’
    • ‘We have also tried to make this issue not only informative but interesting and - in the true Reith public service broadcasting tradition - entertaining.’
    • ‘There is a lively Yoruba-language publishing and broadcasting industry, and widespread use in schools.’
    • ‘If Ofcom gets this original idea off the ground there is a good chance that other European countries with prominent public service broadcasting commitments might also adopt it.’
    • ‘Dutch taxpayers funded Muslim religious schools and mosques, and public television broadcast programs in Moroccan Arabic.’
    • ‘It takes place over 13 weeks, it's 13 half-hours of broadcast television.’
    • ‘The most important thing is to consider television and radio broadcast needs and any other issues that address coverage of the debate.’
    • ‘What are the implications for cable with its digital capacity and its responsibilities in carrying broadcast programming?’

adverb

  • By scattering:

    ‘green manures can be sown broadcast or in rows’
    • ‘However, the grain is generally sown broadcast, the soil here being poorer, and the cost of labour high.’
    • ‘The seed is sown broadcast and then harrowed in.’
    • ‘When the season suits, October is the principal time of putting in the winter wheat, which is usually pickled, and sown broadcast.’

Origin

Mid 18th century (in the sense ‘sown by scattering’): from broad + the past participle of cast. Senses relating to radio and television date from the early 20th century.

Pronunciation:

broadcast

/ˈbrɔːdkɑːst/