Definition of breast in English:

breast

noun

  • 1Either of the two soft, protruding organs on the upper front of a woman's body which secrete milk after childbirth:

    ‘Caroline crossed her arms over her breasts’
    [as modifier] ‘breast cancer’
    • ‘On examination a discrete lump was felt in the upper half of the breast.’
    • ‘Female breasts physiologically are mammary glands, designed to convey nourishment to newborn babies.’
    • ‘After the menopause, breasts may feel softer and less lumpy.’
    • ‘The blanket was only just barely covering her breasts, and he cast his eyes aside immediately.’
    • ‘Some would argue that the only real function of the breast is to provide milk for the newborn.’
    • ‘Korean women usually do not pump their breast or store milk.’
    • ‘The breasts enlarge as the milk ducts and milk-producing cells develop.’
    • ‘She shook her upper body, her breasts swinging.’
    • ‘Many organs in the body make ducts, including the breasts, liver, pancreas, salivary glands and eyes.’
    • ‘The physical reality is that women's breasts sag with childbirth and age, something that is unpreventable.’
    • ‘It may also affect other areas of the body, particularly the elbows and the areas around the breasts.’
    • ‘Site-specific increases were noted for cancers of the breast, stomach, lung/larynx, and ovary.’
    • ‘Once your baby stops nursing, your breast milk will slowly dry up.’
    • ‘Almost all medicines for depression can pass into your breast milk.’
    • ‘You may notice pink, red or purple streaks along your abdomen, breasts, upper arms, buttocks or thighs.’
    • ‘The most researched cancers are those of the bowel, breast, endometrium, prostate, testes, and lung.’
    • ‘All had terminal cancer of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal system or prostate gland.’
    • ‘Lung cancer is the third most common cancer in women, after cancer of the breast and colorectal cancer.’
    • ‘And there's also some big news on the breast cancer fight front tonight.’
    • ‘Talk to your doctor about which medications might effect your breast milk.’
    mammary gland, mamma
    View synonyms
  • 2A person's chest, especially when regarded as the seat of the emotions:

    ‘wild feelings of frustration were rising up in his breast’
    ‘her heart was hammering in her breast’
    • ‘She sat on the back seat, pressing the envelope to her breast.’
    • ‘When he woke up, he found Maria sound asleep on his breast.’
    • ‘The growth can invade local tissues of the breast and chest wall as well as spread through the blood and lymphatic systems.’
    • ‘The parts of the body I mentioned most often were hand and breast, usually one on the other.’
    • ‘Thinking to comfort her love, Seraph sat and cradled Heart to her breast, combing her hair to calm her.’
    heart, soul, bosom, seat of one's emotions, seat of one's feelings, innermost being, core
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The part of a bird or mammal that corresponds to a person's chest:
      [as modifier] ‘the breast feathers of the doves’
      • ‘By now the bird's breast and legs are a brilliant shade of rose-pink.’
      • ‘The bird related the dragon's weak spot over his left breast.’
      • ‘The young birds' breasts showed orange now as they looked hungrily to her, their eyes black and empty.’
      • ‘The passenger pigeon was an attractive bird with a blue back and a pink breast that existed in huge populations.’
      • ‘I also recommend that once the chick is weaned and independent, a microchip identification be placed into the breast muscle of the bird.’
      • ‘He reached up and stroked her breast feathers with one finger and smiled, a pained look on his face forming.’
      • ‘Be sure that it is the native pigeon, a large bird with white plumage on its breast.’
      • ‘Then the brilliant crimson breast of an iiwi bird darts into view.’
      • ‘The brooch was a jeweled bird of paradise with a large sapphire forming the bird's breast.’
      • ‘A newborn rosie somewhat resembles a gray-speckled trout, with only a hint of the trademark pink breast.’
      • ‘Then it preened its scaly breast feathers with a wide beak.’
      • ‘He lets go of the bird, touching its breast for a heartbeat.’
    2. 2.2 A joint of meat or portion of poultry cut from the breast of a bird or mammal:
      ‘Lisa popped a breast of chicken into the microwave’
      • ‘Pheasant has virtually no fat so you will need to put fat bacon over its breast.’
      • ‘Season remaining three chicken breasts with salt and white pepper.’
      • ‘She suggests you eat fish and lean cuts of meat, such as skinless chicken and turkey breasts.’
      • ‘Starting the bird breast down, then turning it over to brown, didn't keep the meat any moister.’
      • ‘Then for my entree: boneless fried chicken breasts, sweet potato fries, and noodle kugel.’
      • ‘Trim the chicken breasts and remove the tenderloins.’
      • ‘Separate skin from meat on breast and back of chicken.’
      • ‘I was ordering pallets full of skirt steaks and chicken breasts.’
      • ‘Next, season the bird all over with salt and pepper, and lay the bacon over the breast with the rashers overlapping each other.’
      • ‘Carve the legs into slices and cut the breast into fillets.’
      • ‘The goal in cooking a turkey is to get your bird cooked and beautifully browned without drying out the breast.’
      • ‘The food is excellent, and you cannot visit here without trying the duck breast.’
      • ‘She probably eats sandwiches that aren't pressed turkey breast on white bread with mayonnaise as well.’
      • ‘Our medium-size meal, based on an easy-to-roast turkey breast, is inspired by Persian flavors.’
      • ‘Remove the bacon from the birds' breasts and return them to the oven for 5 minutes.’
      • ‘Plus, tuna has virtually zero saturated fat, which you can't say about red meat or even a breast of chicken.’
      • ‘Place breast and dark meat slices into labeled freezer bags.’
      • ‘On my first visit, I enjoyed a roasted breast of chicken served with mashed potatoes shot through with truffle oil and fresh morels.’
      • ‘Top each breast with one-quarter-cup sauce and three-quarter-ounce cheese.’
      • ‘Bruises on the birds' breasts and legs are something to watch out for, they can turn the flesh bitter.’
    3. 2.3 The part of a garment that covers the chest:
      [as modifier] ‘a breast pocket’
      • ‘He picked up the bottle and shoved it into the breast pocket of his shirt, which lay crumpled on the night stand.’
      • ‘The stranger was adorning a special emblem on each breast and shoulder.’
      • ‘I move them up to my breast pocket, letting them poke out just a little, like a handkerchief.’
      • ‘He was dressed casually, wearing khaki cargo pants, a dark blue tee shirt with a single breast pocket, and brown hiking boots.’
      • ‘He is dressed in leisure clothes, a neat logo on the breast pocket of his shirt.’
      • ‘He removed a pen tucked into his breast pocket and clicked it a few times.’
      • ‘She had half expected him to display the garment in the breast pocket of his jacket.’
      • ‘Donna rolled her eyes and snatched her sunglasses out of her breast pocket with a quick, skinny hand.’
      • ‘There was a fake I.D. badge clipped to the lapel and the requisite pens in the breast pocket.’
      • ‘Tight tops with short sleeves and breast pocket is detracting from your figure.’
      • ‘The seven-year-old buried her head in Debbie's pajamas, soaking the breast pocket of her shirt.’
      • ‘He stuffed his sunglasses into the breast pocket of his shirt as his eyes searched for her.’
      • ‘They wore navy blue brimmed caps that matched the double breast pocket long sleeve uniforms they wore.’
      • ‘She stuffs it into the breast pocket of his sports jacket.’
      • ‘Staten put down what he was carrying and put the bill in the breast pocket of his tweed jacket.’
      • ‘Golden silk was embroidered on the shoulders and the guild sign of the moon was placed on the left breast.’
      • ‘Much clothing carries a clear indication of its trade origin in internal labels commonly on the neck-band or inside the breast.’
      • ‘The school emblem on the left breast pocket and on the right sleeve looked classy together.’
      • ‘Their badges were clipped on the left side of their shirts just above the breast pockets.’
      • ‘It is best known for the laurel logo on the left breast of polo-style shirts.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Face and move forwards against or through (something):

    ‘I watched him breast the wave’
    • ‘Two huge English gals with shoulders like walruses breasted the waves in perfect unison.’
    • ‘Gripping his crooked staff, the wizard breasted the gasps of indignation and began speaking in a powerful voice.’
    • ‘It was the same feeling he had when breasting the traffic - a swimmer plunging into the crest of a wave would know what he meant.’
    • ‘On the Potomac, swan-white power launches keep breasting the sulphurous wave.’
    • ‘He breasted the finish line in five hours and two minutes.’
    1. 1.1 Reach the top of (a hill):
      ‘a pair of riders breasted the rise ahead’
      • ‘It turned out to be the highlight of the expedition, the day they breasted the icecap.’
      • ‘As the first rays of the sun breasted the peak of the mountain, the enemy slowed.’
      • ‘The train made the climb and breasted the summit at a virtually steady 60 mph.’
      • ‘Once I breasted the summit ridge a cold blast of wind hit me.’

Phrases

  • beat one's breast

    • Make an exaggerated show of sorrow, despair, or regret.

      • ‘In contrast to Antony's desire to blame anyone but himself, Cleopatra spends much of her first speech beating her breast.’
      • ‘I bet you are wailing and gnashing your teeth and beating your breast with many small whips as you ponder this.’
      • ‘He admits he has done wrong but refuses to beat his breast or elaborate on his plea.’
      • ‘At the peak of her ambiguous angst, she beats her breast in sappy mourning upon the death of her father.’
      • ‘Let's all hope that the politician does more than beats his breast and really gives us an impartial look at corporate America.’

Origin

Old English brēost, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch borst and German Brust.

Pronunciation:

breast

/brɛst/