Main definitions of brazier in English

: brazier1brazier2

brazier1

noun

  • 1A portable heater consisting of a pan or stand for holding lighted coals.

    • ‘Even though she was blind, she sensed that no braziers or torches were lit, plunging the room into darkness.’
    • ‘Merchants had thrown rugs on the ground to display their wares and I could see torches and braziers ready to be lit.’
    • ‘He kicked the bedside brazier, showering red coals on the floor.’
    • ‘In medieval times a chafing dish was a portable brazier to hold burning coals or charcoal, designed to be set on a metal stand and to have a dish of food on top.’
    • ‘He then took his place, and the others each lighted a torch in one of the other outer fires and used it to light one of the braziers.’
    • ‘The light outside had dwindled away to almost nothing, and silent soldiers on padded feet were lighting braziers and turning up gas lamps.’
    • ‘She lit the brazier so that the fire could burn the stench of filth away.’
    • ‘She inscribed the patterns on the ground, lit the braziers, and burned the incense, all as instructed.’
    • ‘He looked across the hallway at a low brazier that lit the passage and then walked over to it.’
    • ‘The only light was an unsteady red glow coming from a perforated metal drum nearby: a brazier filled with hot coals.’
    • ‘With the lack of light, the archers are going to be out of the question until those braziers get lit.’
    • ‘He used a folded towel to lift the pot from the bed of coals in the brazier, his ursine countenance screwed into a squint of concentration as he poured.’
    • ‘Heaps of chestnuts are being turned enthusiastically in a brazier of glowing red coals, and I'm encouraged to tuck in.’
    • ‘A brazier stands forlorn in one corner, its fire long burnt out.’
    • ‘We won't win this dispute by standing around braziers on picket lines.’
    • ‘Huge braziers of shining bronze lit the cavernous dining hall with dancing, playful flames.’
    • ‘The girl was calmly prodding a brazier of hot coals with an iron stick.’
    • ‘The air was thick with the smoke from coal fires in tin braziers and stoves.’
    • ‘Before a few stood braziers and camp fires from the night before, allowing for a few of the arrows to be wrought in flame.’
    • ‘The company was seated about one of the braziers that warmed and lit Vengag's great hall.’
  • 2North American A barbecue.

    • ‘People were preparing their midday meals, many on charcoal braziers, when the Great Kanto earthquake struck Tokyo and surrounding areas on September 1, 1923.’
    • ‘A pair of jaded barmen served the local brew, Biere Niger, while to another side of the pool a chef fanned away at a charcoal brazier to provide brochette aperitifs.’
    • ‘Mauritians are also partial to a snack, sold by streetside vendors who cook up on charcoal braziers, fanning the flames with a flourish - another excellent exposure to the outdoor life.’
    • ‘Railway workers prayed silently before their meagre meal, coaxed from the heat of a charcoal brazier.’
    • ‘If you take the time to win their confidence, the secrets of the Atlas will be unveiled over cups of mint tea or perhaps a plateful of tagine, a stew of vegetables, mutton and herbs cooked in conical earthenware pots on charcoal braziers.’
    grill, rotisserie
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century: from French brasier, from braise hot coals.

Pronunciation:

brazier

/ˈbreɪʒə//ˈbreɪzɪə/

Main definitions of brazier in English

: brazier1brazier2

brazier2

noun

  • A worker in brass.

    • ‘Mary's brother Robert Whittaker, a brazier, stripped to his underwear when the ship struck, and threw away 80 gold sovereigns, the weight of which threatened to drown him.’
    • ‘The lower rank comprises ‘the people of every art besides’, who include wrights, blacksmiths, braziers, craftsmen, physicians, judges, druids, and others.’
    • ‘Mr. Carnes was a pewterer, meaning he worked primarily in tin, while Mr. Maycock was a brazier working mostly with brass.’

Origin

Middle English: probably from brass + -ier, on the pattern of glass and glazier.

Pronunciation:

brazier

/ˈbreɪʒə//ˈbreɪzɪə/