Definition of Braille in English:

Braille

noun

mass noun
  • A form of written language for blind people, in which characters are represented by patterns of raised dots that are felt with the fingertips.

    ‘she taught herself Braille’
    ‘all the plants are labelled in Braille’
    as modifier ‘Braille medicine labels’
    • ‘Since it opened I went along with a visually impaired member of the committee to sample the notice board in Braille.’
    • ‘But, pursuing higher education proves to be a challenging task for them due to the acute shortage of textbooks in Braille.’
    • ‘He read in Braille, mainly textbooks translated into finger-touch words by prisoners in Arbour Hill jail.’
    • ‘Drivers will draw lots and be assigned a navigator who will be handed over a map with the route in Braille.’
    • ‘The four-volume 512-page book has been brought out in Braille after its success in several Indian languages and a few foreign languages like Chinese and Korean.’
    • ‘The Visually Impaired National Library for the Blind loans books written in Braille to blind people and also runs a beginner's programme in Braille or Moon.’
    • ‘Since the process of printing pictures in Braille involves heating special paper is required.’
    • ‘Included in the display are both Braille and jumbo-sized playing cards, as well as other classic games which have been retextured, enlarged or recreated in Braille.’
    • ‘He was faced with the challenge of learning a new way of writing and reading in Braille and had to cope with his visual impairment emotionally.’
    • ‘And so she likes to follow what happens to Hermione, but she prefers to read it in Braille and not listen to it on audiotape.’
    • ‘In 1996, researchers reported that the visual cortex at the back of the brain showed increased activity when blind people use the tips of their fingers to read Braille publications.’
    • ‘Important municipal information must also be available in Braille format for the visually impaired.’
    • ‘Most of the classics are available in Braille, but the more obscure texts are not, and all the class handouts had to be scanned for me.’
    • ‘Both of the references to language, in Braille and phonetic code, are veiled in such a way that language doesn't become the vehicle through which you arrive at a certain set of information.’
    • ‘The signage (including pictogram, Braille and raised character) depicts parents, a child and a wheelchair.’
    • ‘The last series has also been published in Braille.’
    • ‘The nine volumes of ‘The Half-Blood Prince’ in Braille weighs about 11 pounds.’
    • ‘The swings have backs to support riders with no upper body strength; many signs are in Braille, and the soft, springy ground is surfaced with recycled tires.’
    • ‘Good examples of such ‘active touch’ include reading of Braille characters and the sorting and selecting of objects in a pocket, out of sight.’
    • ‘Artifact descriptions are etched in Braille into glass lecterns in the National Museum of Colombia, and photosensor-activated handrails trigger audio narrations.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Print or transcribe in Braille.

    ‘a select list of new books have been Brailled and added to stock’
    • ‘My visually impaired junior assistant helped the group get started on Brailling the alphabet.’
    • ‘Audio textbooks can be produced much faster and cheaper than Brailled books, and can be used by students with varying print disabilities.’
    • ‘The software is installed in a Braille Lite-a small, portable Braille note taker that is equipped with synthetic speech and a refreshable Brailled display.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from the name of Louis Braille (see Braille, Louis).

Pronunciation

Braille

/breɪl/