Definition of braid in English:

braid

noun

  • 1mass noun Threads of silk, cotton, or other material woven into a decorative band for edging or trimming garments.

    ‘a coat trimmed with gold braid’
    count noun ‘fancy braids’
    • ‘There was a vivid contrast between the splendour of the gold braid and decoration of the uniform and the jagged holes from the bullet which took Nelson's life.’
    • ‘Elegant satin and silk coverings with braid and lace can cost quite a bit.’
    • ‘They could even spin very fine silk threads and weave these into decorative braids, although it is more likely that they only ever saw the thread rather than the raw silk fibres.’
    • ‘He was around 12 years old, a mop of blond hair and dressed like a Harrods bellboy in red outfit and gold braid.’
    • ‘A set of cheap white hand towels can be made unique by the addition of colored ribbon or braid sewn approximately 3 inches from each end.’
    • ‘Names that fit us like oversized coats, trimmed in seed pearls, gold braid, and the hides of baby seals.’
    • ‘For festive occasions, unmarried women wear small red felt caps adorned with gold braid, and married women don large white hats with starched wings.’
    • ‘I was surprised, by actually liking the way linen print and cotton braid looks when knitted up.’
    • ‘She'd some slate colors in her possession, and I had worn one of the gowns, trimmed with gold braid.’
    • ‘The dashboard is decorated in purple velour and gold braid, protected from dust by a fitted polythene cover.’
    • ‘Although the origin of the word is unknown, an inkle is a coloured tape or braid similar to the braids produced in tablet weaving.’
    • ‘An embroidered cotton upper garment, the valanka, is embellished with tufted fringes and braid along the seams.’
    • ‘She wears all black, except for a cap edged in gold braid.’
    • ‘As charming as he is savvy, Abu Hattem cuts a dashing figure, invariably dressed in immaculate robes covered by a thin brown cloak edged with gold braid.’
    • ‘No one but Michael Jackson wears knee breeches and gold braid anymore.’
    • ‘An army officer's ultimate posing outfit is, of course, his dress uniform, made to measure while at Sandhurst and decorated with lots of shiny brass buttons and gold braid.’
    • ‘Standing atop one of them, with his back to her, was a man wearing a dress blue Navy uniform with yards of gold braid banded around the sleeves.’
    • ‘He was a leader, represented by his standard and his throne-like stool, and perhaps the item worn around his neck decorated with gold braid.’
    • ‘Alongside her on the top deck of the Antarctic survey ship HMS Endurance, stood the Duke of Edinburgh in the uniform of Admiral of the Fleet, encrusted with gold braid.’
    • ‘He wore a tall black hat trimmed with gold braid, a black swallow tail coat with a white silk lining, white knee breeches and black, silver buckled shoes.’
    cord, cording, braiding, bullion, thread, twine, yarn, tape, binding, rickrack, ribbon
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  • 2North American A length of hair made up of three or more interlaced strands.

    ‘her hair curled neatly in blonde braids’
    • ‘She shook her head to physically remove the thoughts from her mind, and she set about plaiting her hair into a braid, tying the end with a pale purple ribbon.’
    • ‘As you methodically create the braids direct the braided hair forward towards the front of the face.’
    • ‘We'll see many more cornrow-inspired looks than individual braids, Amos says.’
    • ‘Keep your look fresh and simple when it comes to your hair, says celebrity hairstylist Oscar James, who advocates braids and twists.’
    • ‘She was tall and skinny, with her blonde hair in two braids on either side of her head.’
    • ‘She has black curly hair pulled back into a braid with loose strands pinned back with those bobby pin things.’
    • ‘It is ideal for natural textures (in loose states, not in braids, twists or locks) or overprocessed hair.’
    • ‘Her veil off, Shouket wore her hennaed hair in a long braid.’
    • ‘She styled the remaining hair into four-strand braids and then unbraided the ends to create wavy strands.’
    • ‘Her hair hung in braids, almost like cornrows, but prettier.’
    • ‘The woman who swept the stone courtyard wore a traditional Tibetan gown, trim and dark, and had plaited her raven hair into a thick braid.’
    • ‘I wore the dress, white tights, black ankle boots and had my hair in braids.’
    • ‘A pleasant breeze came in blew strands of hair our of my braid.’
    • ‘To frame the face - and produce a natural-looking hairline - she attached the hair with tiny braids at the root.’
    • ‘Lately I've been wearing my hair in millions of braids or I'll take them out and wear the afro God gave me.’
    • ‘She had strawberry blonde hair in twin braids, and had the most beautiful smile he'd ever seen.’
    • ‘When my hair was long, I put it in braids or a ponytail.’
    • ‘Many Otavalo men wear their hair in long, black braids.’
    • ‘I plaited my hair into a thick braid and secured it with a stray thread from the hem of my skirt.’
    • ‘Senegalese sisters, eager to weave braids into the hair of women and men, spill from the salons.’
    plait, pigtail, twist
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    1. 2.1 A length made up of three or more interlaced strands of any flexible material.
      ‘a flexible copper braid’
      • ‘Whichever braid you choose I would urge anyone to use a braid of at least 50 lbs BS.’
      • ‘Join the monofilament to the braid with back to back uni or grinner knots.’
      • ‘However, Grams found the hymn's ribbons extremely amusing and braided the long red ribbons into braids.’
      • ‘Silverskin garlic, often referred to as soft-neck garlic, stores incredibly well and is the type used for making garlic braids.’
      • ‘Place on a lightly greased baking sheet and braid loosely (you can do any other shape, but braids are traditional and pretty).’
      • ‘I use braids a lot in my continental fishing, in particular the braids from the Kryston stable.’
      • ‘Think of a braided rope - each strand is strong, but when the three strands are intertwined, the braid is unbreakable.’
      • ‘The end of the braid is then passed through the eye of the needle so that about 7cm is pulled through the end.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Interlace three or more strands of (hair or other flexible material) to form a length.

    ‘their long hair was tightly braided’
    • ‘When Margaret tried to braid her own hair, loose strands always refused to be captured, and made a halo around her pale face.’
    • ‘Do you have any friends who are good enough at braiding hair to get paid for it?’
    • ‘Some women came from as far away as Connecticut, six hours away, to have their hair braided by Cornrows & Co.’
    • ‘Then we used yarn, raffia, feathers, beads, felt and sticks, either sewn, stapled, glued, braided or wrapped.’
    • ‘The chief biological function of hair is - well, I'm told that it's complicated, but surely the function is not served by braiding hair or dying hair.’
    • ‘Chelsea was braiding Andrea's hair in a million little tiny braids, while Andrea had already done a fancy updo on Chelsea.’
    • ‘Round the vast trunk he wraps a rope that he braided from cowhide.’
    • ‘For certain festivals, e.g. Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, the challah may be rounded rather than braided.’
    • ‘I fastened the chain in the back and ran a brush through my hair quickly, braiding the hairs at my temple back, and leaving the rest down.’
    • ‘She continued in my hair, and by closing my eyes, I could almost imagine it was my mother behind me, braiding my hair as I used to wear it when I was young.’
    • ‘Chinese men were forced to braid their long hair into a queue or ‘pigtail’.’
    • ‘Begin braiding the hair by placing the left section over the right, right section over the left.’
    • ‘Fresh, they are delicious, and braided, they last through most of summer, even with a wife who can work garlic into just about every recipe short of dessert.’
    • ‘The hair was braided at the roots, and then set on rods using setting lotion.’
    • ‘The hair was braided from temple to the crown, and then styled in a crisscross pattern.’
    • ‘I opened the door and she was sitting on her bed, braiding her hair.’
    • ‘The stalks of wheat could be spun and braided into many useful things.’
    • ‘Hair care practices, such as braiding hair too tightly, can cause hair loss.’
    • ‘He also prepares the meals, washes dishes, sometimes does the laundry - and even braids hair.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, when she tells her story, many years later to one of her grandchildren, the freed Dessa Rose recalls her mother braiding her hair and her love for Kaine, events that precede the escape adventure.’
    plait, entwine, intertwine, interweave, interlace, interthread, criss-cross, weave, knit, lace, twist, twine, wind
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  • 2often as adjective braidedEdge or trim (a garment) with braid.

    ‘braided red trousers’
    • ‘If he'd played in that game he would have had his lone cap, tasselled and braided with the gold S v E.’
    • ‘He was in Prince Albert's 11 th Hussars, and cut quite a dash on horseback in his crimson trousers, braided tunic, tassels and plumes.’
    trim, edge, border, pipe, hem, fringe, frill
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  • 3usually as adjective braided(of a river or stream) flow into shallow interconnected channels divided by deposited earth or alluvium.

    ‘a braided river carries an enormous burden of sand and gravel’
    • ‘In the section on glacial sediments, Figure G12 takes half a page to show a braided river emanating from a glacier terminus that is not even clearly visible in the picture.’
    • ‘As you drive west toward the coast, seeps and springs in the ravines form small braided waterfalls, full of their own monsoon song.’
    • ‘The river has an open, braided nature on the road side, and you fish towards the beech forest lining the far bank.’
    • ‘The year began for us with a big campaign to protect New Zealand's largest braided river from proposals to take away 73 percent of its water for 60 kilometres.’
    • ‘This succession is interpreted as the aggradational deposits of meandering and braided, sandy and pebbly fluvial channels over floodplain muds and silts.’
    • ‘This series of shales and mudstones was probably deposited by braided stream systems.’
    • ‘The facies of the Skurweberg Formation are very similar to those seen in the South Flarbour Member and are likewise interpreted as proximal, braided river deposits.’
    • ‘Compound cross-stratification is inferred to represent downcurrent-accreting fluvial bars such as those observed in braided rivers.’
    • ‘After several more miles the canyon ended; then it was another five miles along braided river meanders now drowned under Alcova Reservoir.’
    • ‘Miall interpreted horizontally bedded sand as braided river deposits formed either as plane beds in shallow water or during flood stage when plane beds may develop under upper flow regime conditions.’
    • ‘It has been interpreted as having been deposited under very quiet conditions in an abandoned channel within a braided river.’
    • ‘Turquoise creeks braid through the landscape, feeding immense lakes full of brown trout the size of my leg.’
    • ‘He is saying that I, as a resident of the Coromandel, should have no right to comment on the ecological importance of our South Island braided rivers, which are unusual in a global sense.’
    • ‘Large braided rivers can have 20 or more channels at any one location.’
    • ‘In this unit, however, as in many deposits of sandy braided rivers, there are few palaeosols preserved.’
    • ‘As we have just heard, some think that the public should not have a say even on the diversion of two-thirds of the water in one of our last remaining braided rivers.’
    • ‘The Franklin Bluffs station is located on the flood plain of the wide, braided Sagavanirktok River, at the base of a relatively high bluff.’
    • ‘Poorly organized, immature conglomerates of the Mae Rim Formation probably represent alternating debris flows, sheet-flood, and braided channel deposits.’
    • ‘We are about to destroy one of the great braided rivers of New Zealand - possibly even the world.’
    • ‘A few hours below Luwire, the river began braiding again.’

Origin

Old English bregdan ‘make a sudden movement’, also ‘interweave’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch breien (verb).

Pronunciation

braid

/breɪd/