Main definitions of bowl in English

: bowl1bowl2

bowl1

noun

  • 1A round, deep dish or basin used for food or liquid.

    ‘a mixing bowl’
    [as modifier] ‘a sugar bowl’
    • ‘Whatever happened to the classic kitchen table method using a salt and pepper pot, a sugar bowl and a vinegar bottle?’
    • ‘She dished out the food into a bowl and placed the dirty dishes in the sink.’
    • ‘He puts egg yolks, cream, milk, sugar and flavours into a metal bowl, pours in liquid nitrogen and gently stirs.’
    • ‘Combine 3 cups flour and the salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade.’
    • ‘This was mixed in a glass bowl with the liquid liver extract and then rolled into balls to be left overnight to harden.’
    • ‘I put her food bowl in my kitchen, once again on the slick tile floor.’
    • ‘Spoon a portion of the vegetables and clams with the cooking liquid into the bowl.’
    • ‘Put the egg yolk and sugar in a bowl and mix it well, then stir in the mascarpone and vanilla.’
    • ‘Pottery was a very important method of producing cheap cooking pots, bowls, cups, lamps, bottles, jugs, etc…’
    • ‘The room held an adequate bed with a small table and two chairs; a bowl of food and a pitcher of liquid sat on the table.’
    • ‘Put a cup of water into a bowl, mix another cup of sugar to it, add a pinch of salt and squeeze half a lemon into it.’
    • ‘Pour liquid into a large bowl and mix in tomato juice, bell pepper, zucchini, onion, cayenne pepper and salt.’
    • ‘I poured the food in her bowl, mixed it up with a little dry kibble and set it on the floor.’
    • ‘The soups were equally good; the potato soup was thick and creamy and was served in a deep bowl with a generous helping of croutons.’
    • ‘He has rapidly figured out that now the least whisker tickle on my cheek awakens me and food appears in his bowl without argument.’
    • ‘Granted we have a dog, and his bowl, often containing food, is usually on the kitchen floor, but I haven't noticed any of the birds feeding from it.’
    • ‘Put the sugar into the bowl of the food mixer, separate the eggs and add the yolks to the sugar.’
    • ‘Place the flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.’
    • ‘Mix the flour, sugar and raisins together in a bowl then add the liquid, stirring well to combine.’
    • ‘Put the sugar and butter into the bowl of a food mixer and beat for several minutes till white and fluffy.’
    dish, basin, pan, pot, crock, crucible, mortar
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The contents of a bowl.
      ‘they ate huge bowls of steaming spaghetti’
      • ‘However, until then you can content yourself with giant bowls of hot noodles.’
      • ‘This is what the guests found: meatballs about the diameter of £2 coins made of lamb, beef and pork mince, with bowls of quite peppery tomato sauce.’
      • ‘But there is a bowl of milk and a bowl of food under a certain bush.’
      • ‘Not only were we giving out warm blankets to the residents, we were also providing over 1,000 bowls of hot pho ga (chicken noodle soup).’
      • ‘Nicholl's aim is to rescue the real man - who lived in real time and ate real bowls of soup - behind the stereotyped image of the universal genius with which we are all familiar.’
      • ‘Alan, all twinkly eyed and Rosy cheeked, playfully indulged Kathy as she poured large quantities of liquid nitrogen into a bowl of custard.’
      • ‘Tony said: ‘Our bowls of porridge are a success with all age groups and people from all backgrounds.’’
      • ‘When I was volunteering for the AIDS Ride last year, there were these big bowls of creamy goop that covered the tables at every pit stop.’
      • ‘If you time it right, you can wander from bowls of cut melons in produce to Gorgonzola on toothpicks in the cheese section to baskets of bread cubes to dip in olive oil.’
      • ‘Only one more day to go of big bowls of pasta and putting my feet up before the big day - before I become one of the 8,000 taking part in this year's London Triathlon.’
      • ‘After finishing the beef, we ordered bowls of rice and Roti Canai, a kind of Indian crisp pancake, and mixed them in the curry sauce, which tasted delicious!’
      • ‘She stands up from the table and then starts to bring in the various dishes and bowls of the different foods she has prepared.’
      • ‘For the chilly version of a chafing dish, serve bowls or cups of food on ice-filled trays, platters, or foil pans.’
      • ‘The servants came out, carrying silver bowls and dishes of food.’
      • ‘Those of us who survive mainly on bowls of cereal don't know whom to thank for last month's 29-cent drop in the local price of a gallon of milk.’
      • ‘Breakfast was little bowls of cream scrambled egg with smoked salmon.’
      • ‘Eventually, the robbers left the bank with nothing more than their very queasy stomachs after having eaten a number of bowls of this wretched vanilla pudding.’
      • ‘Each click buys a bowl of food for a rescued animal.’
      • ‘Hedgehogs can also be tempted to stay with saucers of meat-based cat or dog food and a bowl of water - though this might reduce their desire to seek out pests.’
      • ‘Student exhibitions will have bowls of hummus and chips whereas better galleries have brie, fruit platters and smoked salmon at their openings.’
    2. 1.2[usually in names]A decorative round dish awarded as a prize in a competition.
      ‘the McGeorge Rose Bowl’
      • ‘On the bus ride to the regional scholastic bowl competition, Rhea and Jonas shared a seat and a box of donuts.’
      • ‘City's Trust will collect £700 prize money and will also hold a commemorative bowl for 12 months.’
      • ‘Quiz bowl competitions can be extremely tense affairs, with down to the line finishes and shattered dreams.’
      • ‘The top three finishers in each division receive a wooden bowl as a trophy.’
      • ‘Top cash prize at the nationals is $25,000 plus a very nice silver bowl.’
      • ‘At the time, the Cup was just the silver bowl atop what is now the trophy.’
      • ‘The silver-gilt bowl was made for the firm of Wakely and Wheeler in 1903.’
      • ‘Achilles brings out the prizes for the foot race: a silver bowl for first, handed cup for second, and a half bar of gold for third.’
      • ‘Sure to be a big hit will be the pro drives round the legendary Millbrook bowl in the new Clio Renaultsport V6.’
      • ‘Arc lights and packed ballroom meant profuse sweating, not only for the four contenders for the grand silver bowl but everyone present there.’
      • ‘Andrew said he was ‘totally surprised’ at his win and the award, a beech bowl carved by youngsters involved in the trust.’
      • ‘Last week, Fukuda took home another award - an engraved silver bowl from Tiffany.’
      • ‘The remaining sides now go forward to the plate and bowl competitions.’
    3. 1.3A rounded, concave part of an object.
      ‘a toilet bowl’
      ‘the bowl of a spoon’
      • ‘It is alleged that he even tried to carry the toilet bowl, or did he?’
      • ‘Shelledy did not know about the secret dealings, which he likened to drinking from a toilet bowl.’
      • ‘From the bowl upwards, the structure gets slightly thinner and culminates in four struts that come together leaving four loops.’
      • ‘It was barreling so hard that it was impossible to take off from the bowl.’
      • ‘The sewerage was coming up the toilet bowl in one house.’
      • ‘She then twirled the staff around, then came down into a half-crouch, stabbing down at the ground with the bowl of the staff.’
      • ‘Our rubber boots went squish on the way down and sounded something like a plunger being removed from a toilet bowl on the way up.’
      • ‘Way off to the south, the open bowl of a stadium gave off a penetrating musical threat.’
      • ‘I saw the toilet bowl, but by then it was too late.’
      • ‘Now I was seeing mental images of water swirling down the toilet bowl because that's where this conversation was headed.’
      • ‘He took the squirrel and flushed it into the toilet bowl.’
      • ‘The cheesy photos of Georgia that ring the bowl of the arena add nothing.’
      • ‘Sometimes I'd just like to dunk my face in the toilet bowl, slam the lid on it; and commit sewercide!’
      • ‘The suggestions included the following amongst others and left me with images of whole families perched on the toilet bowl indefinitely.’
      • ‘There are studies that have been shown that if you don't put the toilet lid down, that when you flush the toilet, the drops from the toilet bowl will reach the ceiling.’
      • ‘If you keep your cell phone in your back pocket, it is certain that at some point, it will fall into the toilet bowl.’
      • ‘You and your ilk are being flushed down the toilet bowl of history.’
      • ‘And next thing you know, you're puking in the toilet bowl, and people are laughing.’
      • ‘They unscrewed a Mason jar inside a toilet bowl to get that hollow, massive echo.’
      • ‘She was sitting on the closed lid of the toilet bowl, wounds far from being cleaned, clothes sweat-drenched and dirty.’
      • ‘I may post a little pic of myself yodelling into the toilet bowl on Christmas morning, but otherwise I'm shutting up about it for a couple of days.’
      • ‘Personally, I find this practice extremely vulgar, as there always remains evidence of their habit in the U-bend of their toilet bowl.’
    4. 1.4US informal A pipe used to smoke marijuana, or the contents of such a pipe.
      ‘hey, you wanna smoke a bowl with us?’
  • 2Geography
    A natural basin.

    • ‘It did rise up into front of him, a wall of rock and dirt flying from the barren land of the mountain side and stretching from on side of the mountain face to the other on a slant that curved into a bowl at the end.’
    • ‘The ground nearby has been contoured so that a slight bowl is suggested.’
    • ‘Where the road was, the house seemed to be at the bottom of a shallow bowl of weeds and terrain.’
    • ‘Her wings had long since begun to ache when she finally crossed the circle of mountains into the natural bowl beyond.’
    • ‘It was a mile-long track, kidney shaped, roughly on the alignment of the present road circuit in a natural bowl of giving spectators wonderful viewing.’
    • ‘The levees created the bowl, and now the breach in the levees is filling that bowl up with water.’
    • ‘Beckoning below is a stadium-sized bowl of fresh powder atop an impressive base.’
    hollow, valley, dip, depression, indentation, well, trough, crater, cavity, concavity, sinkhole, hole, pit, excavation
    View synonyms
  • 3US [in names] A stadium for sporting or musical events.

    ‘the Hollywood Bowl’
    • ‘But the stadium is a bowl with two tiers all the way round and it's kind of on top of you.’
    • ‘Cleveland has a fresh face and while Pittsburgh is in the process of ditching the Three Rivers' stadium, it is not to build a space-age out-of-town bowl or dome.’
    • ‘The Red Berets all landed safely, although one of them almost rearranged some seating in the northern bowl area of the stadium.’
    • ‘And what about Queen's Park, the Town Gardens and the concert bowl, and Lydiard Park and its beautifully restored mansion?’
    • ‘The bowl was virtually empty at the start of the event but had filled up by the evening with around 800 people attending the concert throughout the day.’
    • ‘This created the effect of a massive bowl with the arena at the lowest point.’
    • ‘By the end of the event the bottom of the bowl looked like a fat girl's slumber party.’
    • ‘Widespread grumbling filled the Celtic Park bowl yesterday when the fourth official held up a board revealing four minutes of time to be added on.’
    • ‘Perhaps Bertie might consider an amphitheatre for the orchestra, after he has built the bowl, of course.’
    • ‘The defence which resisted Holland in the orange bowl of the arena for two hours last week was breached three times at home by Denmark during the qualifying campaign.’
    • ‘The Surulere in Lagos is Nigeria's national stadium, an almost totally-uncovered bowl with a capacity of 55,000.’
    stadium, arena, amphitheatre, coliseum, colosseum
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1An American football game played after the regular season between leading teams.
      ‘Pro Bowl’
      [as modifier] ‘their last four bowl games’
      • ‘Michigan and Oklahoma were the two teams we faced the last two bowl games, and we were prepared.’
      • ‘That means a Liberty Bowl bid, even though TCU is good enough to compete in a major bowl.’
      • ‘In two years, he planted the seeds that Erickson nurtured into three bowl games in the last four seasons.’
      • ‘They all are fast, tall, and play for high-profile programs that qualified for bowl games last year.’
      • ‘Purdue's football team has been to four straight bowl games, including the 2001 Rose Bowl.’
      • ‘The Big Ten pulled in more than $38 million from eight bowl games this past season.’
      • ‘He was preparing for his first major bowl game as a quarterback, while I was too consumed with Goldschlager as a marching band geek.’
      • ‘As a freshman, he missed two games - one with an ankle injury and then Auburn's bowl game with a broken clavicle.’
      • ‘But after two games it's clear Dame will have a hard time just getting into a bowl.’
      • ‘Some schools will actually have lay-offs of between five and six weeks between the regular season and their bowl game!’
      • ‘A playoff would make fans care about all four major bowl games.’
      • ‘But if Corsie's departure from competitive bowls should be lamented by fans and players, it barely harms our international standing.’
      • ‘Now, we know one bowl game that has special meaning this year, the Cotton Bowl on Saturday.’
      • ‘The Fighting Irish play seven bowl teams from 2000, including Nebraska and Tennessee.’
      • ‘There's still a chance for the Big Ten to place nine teams in bowl games this season.’
      • ‘If they stay in the top six, they will be guaranteed a berth in one of the four most lucrative bowl games.’
      • ‘Back in my day that was okay because there were only four bowl games.’
      • ‘The Broncos' only previous bowl games were three wins the previous four seasons in the Humanitarian Bowl on their campus.’
      • ‘You have your teams in the bowl games that are strong; anyone one can beat anybody on that level.’
      • ‘And coming off of two straight bowl seasons and with 18 starters returning, it should be a grand finale.’
      • ‘Sixteen teams will compete in the group stages on Saturday, with the bowl, plate and finals to take place the following day.’

Origin

Old English bolle, bolla, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch bol round object, also to boll.

Pronunciation:

bowl

/bəʊl/

Main definitions of bowl in English

: bowl1bowl2

bowl2

noun

  • 1A wooden or hard rubber ball, slightly asymmetrical so that it runs on a curved course, used in the game of bowls.

    • ‘He came back with a bruise on his cheek where the troll had hit him with a wooden bowl, and grinning like a mad man.’
    • ‘Arun groaned, a sound that redoubled in frustration as he saw the wooden bowl resting on the ground.’
    • ‘Stay down until the bowl has travelled a few metres, then bring the back foot up alongside the front foot to complete the delivery.’
    • ‘Like golf greens, bowls greens can vary in texture, grass length, and so on, and this can affect the time taken for a bowl to travel from point A to point B.’
    • ‘You will find there is less catchment area for the wind to affect the bowl on its course.’
    1. 1.1A large ball with indentations for gripping, used in tenpin bowling.
      • ‘Those lovable Americans are encouraged to ‘get on down’ to their local bowling place and throw a bowl in support of those guys with balls.’
      • ‘Correction may involve using a smaller bowl or changing the grip from fingertip to claw.’
      • ‘William shrugged, and gripped the bowl with his left hand, picking at something brown with the other.’
    2. 1.2A wooden ball or disc used in playing skittles.
      • ‘Staying down until the jack or bowl has travelled 4 to 5 metres towards your objective position is strongly recommended.’
      • ‘On one occasion I watched the ball skittle all the bowls much to the chagrin of the bowlers.’
  • 2A spell or turn of bowling in cricket.

    • ‘He had his first bowl in senior cricket, sending down a tidy over.’
    • ‘If the opposition bowls well sometimes, we might not score at that rate, but if you look in the recent past the margin of error for the opposition bowlers is quite small, so they've got to be right on top of their game.’
    • ‘It was the most draining day I had ever experienced in Test cricket and I hadn't even had a bowl.’
    • ‘Australian hands that were warming in pockets were suddenly preparing for a second bowl.’
    • ‘He had some reason to feel hard done by after Hamish not only got to bat ahead of him, but had a bowl as well.’

verb

  • 1[with object and adverbial of direction] Roll (a ball or other round object) along the ground.

    ‘she snatched her hat off and bowled it ahead of her’
    • ‘The ball is bowled and you play shots, which will fetch you points.’
    • ‘At dawn alert next day Suwanti chained the dogs away from a round jungle-green enigma then bowled the baby into the hedge to its kind.’
    • ‘I was just not happy with the way he bowled the new ball.’
    • ‘He didn't bowl a ball in anger for over a year and is only now gently feeling his way back.’
    • ‘This from a little boy with home-made stumps bowling tennis balls.’
    • ‘And when he takes his notion and rolls it into a wonderful softball and bowls it at you, he's incredible.’
    • ‘I think it's very, very obvious when a ball is not bowled.’
    • ‘Are they enjoying their comfy suburb, maybe walking the dog through their local park, burning a few snags, or just bowling a few balls to their kids?’
    • ‘He brought three full ones back with him, one of which he bowled in Chuck's direction before resuming his seat.’
    • ‘You are not allowed to change the angle of your arm as you bowl the ball.’
  • 2Cricket
    [with object] (of a bowler) propel (the ball) with a straight arm towards the batsman, typically in such a way that the ball bounces once.

    ‘Lillee bowled another bouncer’
    [no object] ‘Sobers bowled to Willis’
    • ‘The Sardar asked him to bowl a few balls and diagnosed the illness: his right shoulder was falling away.’
    • ‘It was re-arranged to take place at the HSBC Bank Sports Club ground at Beckenham last month - but was again rained off, without a ball being bowled.’
    • ‘It's difficult after sitting in the dressing-room all afternoon to have to get yourself switched to go out in the rain and be motivated to bowl one ball.’
    • ‘As soon as Lawson bowled the first ball I've seen him bowl the howl went up.’
    • ‘When Strydom bowled the first ball of the final over, the visitors' last pair had already survived five overs for the addition of three runs.’
    • ‘Rafter on the other hand seems like the sort of bloke who would bowl a lolly ball for the non-sportingly capable kid to have a crack at.’
    • ‘When the first ball was bowled, Mandira gave a simple catch.’
    • ‘It's a ball bowled by a right-arm leg spinner that looks like it's going to spin one way, but actually goes the other.’
    • ‘Challengers Windermere and Warton were due to come head-to-head for the first time this summer but not a ball was bowled at Windermere because of the conditions.’
    • ‘Without bowling a ball at Waringstown yesterday, their ICC Trophy Group A clash against the USA was called off due to heavy rain.’
    • ‘Indian sportswriters covering the game found the city thick with rumors long before the first ball was bowled.’
    • ‘Just five balls were bowled in Barrow's innings when rain forced the players off the field.’
    • ‘‘All I was thinking was that it didn't matter where he was going to bowl the ball, it was still going for six,’ he chortled.’
    • ‘The floodlit one-day international between West Indies and New Zealand A at Bristol was abandoned without a ball being bowled because of persistent heavy rain.’
    • ‘On Monday he bowled eight balls off his long run at Old Trafford and with us he sent down 20 deliveries.’
    • ‘Pollock bowled the first ball of the innings to Trescothick, it went near the bat, the batsman's led, the batsman's forearm and there were a couple of noises.’
    • ‘A ball wasn't bowled at Alexandra Meadows last week, and their league match against Rishton was abandoned with Bacup on course for victory.’
    • ‘York's cup-tie at Appleby Frodingham yesterday was abandoned without a ball being bowled because of the wet weather.’
    pitch, throw, propel, hurl, toss, lob, loft, fling, launch, let fly, shy, cast, project, send, deliver
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Dismiss (a batsman) by knocking down the wicket with the ball which one has bowled.
      ‘Stewart was bowled for 33’
      • ‘Scarborough was bowled for 98 in an innings that contained 12 fours and 6 sixes and lasted only 72 balls.’
      • ‘They plundered 125 before Pollard was bowled for a fine 72.’
      • ‘They took a gamble and bowled their main bowlers out and it paid off for them.’
      • ‘The home side made a bright start with 64 for the first wicket where Rob Taylor was bowled for 41.’
      • ‘His scalps included the captain, Angelo Mathews, who was bowled for an impressive 80.’
      • ‘Bradford Park Avenue footballer Stansfield was bowled for 35.’
      • ‘In 1931 he famously bowled Australia's great batsman out for a duck.’
      • ‘But Bradman's brilliance is perhaps best illustrated by one of his rare failures, his final Test innings when he was bowled for a duck.’
      • ‘He is bowled for a duck in his final Test innings’
      • ‘The score had reached 183 when Williamson was bowled for 45 which included three sixes and two fours.’
      • ‘McKenzie never looked comfortable against the off spinner and was bowled for 12, playing across the line to a yorker.’
      • ‘He had come to India to bowl those Indian batsmen out and not to get killed by Wes Hall.’
      • ‘On the other side of it, what if an illegal-action bowler bowls a batsman out consistently?’
      • ‘Anybody who has ever played the game knows that if a batsman is bowled, there is no need to appeal to the umpire.’
      • ‘Four of the top five Indian batsmen were bowled at St George's Park.’
      • ‘I have observed that Sachin is usually bowled when he is playing forward.’
      • ‘They put on a superb 152 to take the score to 188 where Hodgson was bowled for a well-struck 96.’
      • ‘Joshi claimed two more wickets - bowling Pollock and, two balls later, having a defensive Crookes caught.’
      • ‘Cumberland lost their fourth wicket at 146 when Robert Mason was bowled for 53, having hit his first half-century for the county.’
      • ‘Then Parsons holed out for 40, Isles was bowled for 34 and the end soon followed with the deficit being 129 runs.’
    2. 2.2Get an entire team out.
      ‘they bowled Lancashire out for 143’
      • ‘But it was the first time we have bowled a side out this year and there is a great deal more confidence running through the team.’
      • ‘We do not believe we can bowl a side out during a Test.’
      • ‘Because wickets are nowhere near as important as runs, one of the two pillars upon which cricket is built (the ability to bowl a side out) is temporarily removed for the one-day game, then reinstalled like a drop-in pitch for Test matches.’
      • ‘The idea was to score quickly, at as close to four an over as possible, so as to put the game out of the reach of the opposition and allow yourself time enough to bowl a side out twice.’
      • ‘It is crucial for the captain to have faith in his spinners for no spinner can bowl a side out in 2 overs.’
  • 3British [no object, with adverbial of direction] Move rapidly and smoothly in a specified direction.

    ‘they bowled along the country roads’
    • ‘Do you realise, my darling inflated panther, that now you can go bowling in any direction you like?’
    • ‘The latter flew from the outset and in truth was never seriously challenged as he bowled along in front.’
    • ‘I have to decide what sort of position my horse wants to be in, whether it's bowling along in front, sitting on the pace, racing alone or in the pack.’
    • ‘During the war we had a gig with a cart horse and used to bowl along around the north-west end of town - great transport when petrol was rationed.’
    • ‘Graham and I took a wing each, and bowling along down the slope we got up enough speed and launched the lumbering thing into the void.’
    • ‘Running against the wind was like treading water, running with the wind was like bowling along under sail.’
    • ‘So here we are, in the middle of a solemn, yet frantic, chat-fest of the sort that bowls along after the sudden passage of sad events.’
    • ‘Candy Gable was bowled along by the crowd, finishing in 59 minutes.’
    • ‘When I first see her she's bowling along a Soho street, looking late and anxious, in a pair of hippy maroon cords and a flappy purple jumper.’
    • ‘Traditionally happy to bowl along in front Edredon lost the lead long before the leading pack made the sweeping turn for home.’
    • ‘Firefighters change en route, as they bowl down the Byres Road or hurtle along the motorway.’
    • ‘That was fun, though I had to live with a deal of protectiveness as we bowled along.’
    • ‘Through all the hardship, Dunne's humour and candour keeps the book bowling along.’
    • ‘He wasn't bowling along as if for fun as he usually does.’
    • ‘Taking the Copen on to the A1M and M1, as well as a few rural lanes, it bowled merrily along, the engine producing a buzz in more ways than one.’
    • ‘There's no better car to bowl along in with the roof down in posing mode while the radar takes care of the obstructions.’
    • ‘Mr Schoefisch says things could bowl along for another year or two, but at some stage there will be a correction, which could be quite dramatic.’
    • ‘During the Carnival a wide draw has proved no disadvantage on the dirt and this front-runner will soon be bowling along at the head of affairs.’
    • ‘The Autumn fun trek bowled along in style again last week.’
    • ‘As we bowl along, I sit back and talk to some of the other tourists in the bus.’
    hurtle, speed, career, shoot, streak, sweep, hare, fly, wing
    View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • bowl someone over

    • 1Knock someone down.

      ‘he was almost bowling people over in his haste’
      • ‘The spectre shoved the corpse into a nearby gathering of troops, surprising them briefly when he charged into them, bowling them to the ground.’
      • ‘Drake gasped as the woman's knee came up quickly to connect with his midsection, knocking the wind out of him and bowling him over.’
      • ‘And since then he hasn't exactly bowled himself into the ground.’
      • ‘Johann Louw will again be bowled into the ground, but support is lacking.’
      • ‘I raced from my room as soon as I heard it, bowling my small, round father over in the process.’
      • ‘They shared a devious look before launching themselves on Blair with fluffy pillows, bowling her to the ground.’
      • ‘Jennifer jumped to the ground as her father bowled the man over.’
      • ‘I gathered my legs beneath me and leapt from the tree, bowling Sara to the ground in a single motion.’
      • ‘they fling themselves onto an unsuspecting Connor, bowling him over and knocking him against a wall’
      • ‘Aligore dove forward, throwing his bulk against Tom and the children, bowling them to the ground.’
      knock down, knock over, bring down, fell, floor, prostrate
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1informal Greatly impress someone by one's good qualities, looks, or achievements.
        ‘when he met Angela he was just bowled over by her’
        • ‘When the Weekender interviewed Mary at the time she was bowled over with a mixture of shock and excitement.’
        • ‘He told me later that evening to pack my bags, I though he was throwing me out and when I asked him this, he was bowled over with laughter.’
        • ‘Rather, it was built to impress man, bowl him over with its magnitude, and remind him what an insignificant twit he really is.’
        • ‘First produced in Marie's home city in 1999, the play has gone on to enjoy unprecedented success in London's West End and Broadway, where even the, hard to impress, Sligo Weekender Editor was bowled over by it.’
        • ‘Tenpins bowls over rivals in Fayette on closing day at Keeneland’
        • ‘They're amazed at this bizarre situation and it completely bowls Moxey over.’
        • ‘Even just a simple Thank You card given at the holidays or the end of the school term could be enough to bowl them over in shock.’
        • ‘Speaking from his base in New York, the Wet, Wet, Wet frontman with the twinkly eyes and winning smile, explained he was bowled over by the quality of the songs in Chicago.’
        • ‘Once again I was bowled over by the quality of the dancers.’
        • ‘I'd love to be bowled over by somebody who I worship the ground they walk on, but it hasn't happened.’
        overwhelm, astound, amaze, astonish, surprise, impress, overawe, dumbfound, stagger, stun, daze, bewilder, nonplus, shock, startle, shake, take aback, leave open-mouthed, leave aghast
        View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the general sense ‘ball’): from Old French boule, from Latin bulla bubble.

Pronunciation:

bowl

/bəʊl/