Definition of bovver boots in English:

bovver boots

noun

British
informal
  • Heavy laced boots extending to the mid-calf, typically worn by skinheads.

    • ‘But it was the visual image of the tribes that scandalised the public: the bovver boots and crops of the skins; the safety pins and loo-brush hairdos of the punks.’
    • ‘The fairies, with their grubby faces and bovver boots, look and behave in part like naughty children who have raided the dressing-up box and in part like escapees from the local lunatic asylum.’
    • ‘He was less impressed by the performance itself in which two actors, wearing all black and bovver boots took on the 21 different roles.’
    • ‘We knew he was a nerd before he acquired his skinhead haircut, and nobody will be fooled by his new bovver boots any more than they were by his baseball cap.’
    • ‘But it has evolved from the skinhead and bovver boots image of the Seventies.’
    • ‘Is it time to cast off the bovver boots and pull on some sensible walking shoes?’
    • ‘The one-time wild child may still strut his stuff in bovver boots but his sensitive playing never loses its grip.’
    • ‘At this point, I can picture my incensed critics lacing up their bovver boots for a spot of Grievous Literary Harm.’
    • ‘The pregnant actress sported a particularly frumpy skirt, striped Nora Batty-style long socks and wedge-heeled bovver boots on a trip out in London.’
    • ‘Drunken louts should be quaking in their bovver boots next month when a special booze patrol is launched in Wimbledon to crack down on their alcohol-fuelled bad behaviour.’
    gumboot, wellington, wader, walking boot, riding boot, field boot, jackboot, thigh boot, half-boot, ankle boot, pixie boot, chelsea boot, balmoral, desert boot, moon boot, snow boot
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

bovver boots

/ˈbɒvəbuːts/