Definition of bourgeois in English:

bourgeois

adjective

  • 1Belonging to or characteristic of the middle class, typically with reference to its perceived materialistic values or conventional attitudes.

    ‘a rich, bored, bourgeois family’
    ‘these views will shock the bourgeois critics’
    • ‘It thought it was so much better than its parents, those class-bound dinosaurs whose bourgeois values it thought it was systematically eliminating.’
    • ‘There's a famous letter he wrote to his brother, denouncing him for not accepting the bourgeois values.’
    • ‘His work is critical of bourgeois values, particularly sexual repression, and exposes hypocrisy.’
    • ‘Divorces were concentrated among middle-class and bourgeois women living in the towns of northern France.’
    • ‘Bad memories resurface as each character's hidden resentment is revealed, from redundancy to marital rejection and disillusionment with bourgeois values.’
    • ‘Could it be that in just two years the scourge of bourgeois values is now entering the American mainstream?’
    • ‘The more the peasant exerted himself in response to the government's plea for more production, the more he prospered and developed bourgeois attitudes.’
    • ‘People in the privileged classes can sniff at bourgeois values and still turn out O.K. because they eventually grow up.’
    • ‘Sadly, this means that instead of remaining at the cutting edge of creativity, London designers are sometimes forced to take on bourgeois values.’
    • ‘What is remembered is their immorality and their rejection of bourgeois values applied to family, society and the formal concept of beauty.’
    • ‘Illegitimacy, welfare dependency, and criminality were more prevalent than in the South, with its much stronger bourgeois values.’
    • ‘They both were scions of bourgeois families, raised and living in a typical middle class milieu.’
    • ‘He analyzed bourgeois culture which conveniently precluded his being absorbed by it.’
    • ‘The Middle East became the lover she could not have and a refuge from the bourgeois England of her family.’
    • ‘This was a prosperous time for Bavaria and there developed a flourishing art market, concentrating on conventional, unchallenging bourgeois genre pieces.’
    • ‘Hippies seem to come from largely bourgeois families.’
    • ‘The slate had to be cleaned of all bourgeois conventions, traditions and expectations.’
    • ‘In fact, throughout the 19th century, the French state was a bourgeois state which echoed middle-class needs and values.’
    • ‘The sensuality of the dance and the lyrics emphasizing lowlife values and language challenged bourgeois morality and dominant views on appropriate female behavior.’
    • ‘Rational recreation was best expressed in the suburban ideal of the bourgeois family home that had clearly emerged by 1850.’
    middle-class, property-owning, propertied, shopkeeping
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(in Marxist contexts) upholding the interests of capitalism; not communist.
      ‘bourgeois society took for granted the sanctity of property’
      • ‘British capitalism is a bourgeois democracy, and both bits of that label are important.’
      • ‘At one point, Communists said that bourgeois democracy was a step forward from feudalism.’
      • ‘The social democrats gambled on bourgeois democracy and the stability of capitalism.’
      • ‘It was only with the development of capitalism, the capitalist market and the bourgeois state that minority languages were actively repressed.’
      • ‘Pivotal to such a bourgeois conception of socialism, is the bourgeois assessment of capitalism.’

noun

  • A bourgeois person.

    ‘a self-confessed and proud bourgeois’
    • ‘Until the mid-seventeenth century, bourgeois and nobles in many regions used the local tongue among themselves, and even wrote literary works in them.’
    • ‘My first weekend off in a month, and I'm with Eton and the English bourgeois.’
    • ‘In a phrase, he did not want to be a Communist so much as he wanted not to be a bourgeois.’
    • ‘It's in your hands now, you hip intellectual bourgeois!’
    • ‘Nobles and bourgeois depended on extra-economic coercion to appropriate this mass of resources controlled by common subjects.’
    • ‘By 1931 the uneasiness had extended to many conservative bourgeois who viewed the radicalism of the new movement with apprehension.’
    • ‘Far from being typical of the Swiss bourgeois his enemies have described, his ideas were highly innovative and far ahead of his time.’
    • ‘All the same, many bourgeois wore thick shoes, carried umbrellas, and tried to look as much like their own concierges as they could.’
    • ‘The rise of relativism, and its inevitable corollary, nihilism, represents the triumph of the bourgeois.’
    • ‘Just as nobles and bourgeois were defined by their lifestyle, so too were workers, with the common economic feature that they all worked with their hands.’
    • ‘My dreams differed from those of the common bourgeois.’
    • ‘The typical bourgeois of the middle years of the century was too busy making money to be bothered with politics.’
    • ‘In its completely developed form this family exists only among the bourgeois.’
    • ‘It was a philosophy for the public sphere as well as a statement of the contemporary bourgeois.’
    • ‘While nobles and bourgeois owned most of the land, peasants were left in control of it.’
    • ‘Do this at the Opera House and the bourgeois in the front row would be shifting uncomfortably in their seats I'll wager.’
    • ‘It attracted to its ranks many local bourgeois.’
    • ‘At the end of 1968, a group of student rebels accused Li of being a ‘newly born bourgeois.’’
    • ‘A State Council served as the consulting body, comprised mainly of Neapolitan nobles and bourgeois.’
    • ‘The play fails as tragedy not because Willy is a struggling bourgeois rather than a man of stature, but because he lacks the element of choice. He is a victim, not an anti-hero.’
    member of the middle class, property owner
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French, from late Latin burgus castle (in medieval Latin fortified town), ultimately of Germanic origin and related to borough. Compare with burgess.

Pronunciation:

bourgeois

/ˈbʊəʒwɑː/