Main definitions of bourbon in English

: bourbon1Bourbon2Bourbon3

bourbon1

noun

mass noun
  • A kind of American whisky distilled from maize and rye.

    count noun ‘he moved to the sideboard to pour himself a bourbon’
    • ‘Red wine, for instance, is more likely to result in a severe hangover than white wine; bourbon and port are more likely to than gin or vodka.’
    • ‘Not all people enjoy the bitter taste of beer, so it is a good idea to have some delicious vodka or bourbon as a taste alternative.’
    • ‘The bourbon and tequila will also tenderize the meat, but if left too long, the meat will caramelize - that's bad.’
    • ‘I gently explain that they don't do bourbon in small country pubs in England.’
    • ‘Marie nodded and then poured some more bourbon on the wound, to disinfect it.’
    • ‘Of course, the menu also offers an extension selection of cognacs, single malts, bourbons and other whiskies, together with beer and wine suggestions.’
    • ‘Nearly all rum is aged in used oak barrels once used to mature bourbon or other whiskies.’
    • ‘Try drinking your way through its range of hundreds of blends and single malts, bourbons, Scotch, Irish and even Indian whiskies, and you'll forget Ascot was ever here’
    • ‘He had a fag in hand and 19 bourbon and cokes lined up down the bar.’
    • ‘Leaning on the counter for balance, I nearly clear knocked our paper-bag wrapped bottle of bourbon onto the floor.’
    • ‘You try mixing Thunderbird and rotgut bourbon and see how you feel.’
    • ‘It's a tough life. I think I'll pour myself another bourbon and light up a cigarette.’
    • ‘The spirits called for in the following recipes are pure grain alcohol, vodka and bourbon or brandy.’
    • ‘Bourbon dinners feature dishes made with bourbon and different bourbons or whiskies served with each course.’
    • ‘This is one of the primary reasons why extended aging is not as important to tequila as it might be to bourbon or cognac.’
    • ‘Those times were becoming more frequent as Cyrus drank more… moonshine mostly, bourbon when he could get it.’
    • ‘Furnished in much red velvet plush, it's dark and decadent with a stunning choice of whiskies and bourbon.’
    • ‘And its consumption of bourbon whisky is about to overtake that of the US.’
    • ‘Last night, in the absence of echinacea, I doctored myself with a fiery curry and generous amounts of a rather rough Kentucky bourbon.’
    • ‘As an aside, I will note that I drank bourbon and ginger ales throughout this extravaganza.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: named after Bourbon County, Kentucky, where it was first made.

Pronunciation

bourbon

/ˈbəːb(ə)n//ˈbʊəːb(ə)n/

Main definitions of bourbon in English

: bourbon1Bourbon2Bourbon3

Bourbon2

proper noun

  • The surname of a branch of the royal family of France. The Bourbons ruled France from 1589, when Henry IV succeeded to the throne, until the monarchy was overthrown in 1848, and reached the peak of their power under Louis XIV in the late 17th century. Members of this family have also been kings of Spain (1700–1931 and since 1975).

Pronunciation

Bourbon

/ˈbɔːbɒn/

Main definitions of bourbon in English

: bourbon1Bourbon2Bourbon3

Bourbon3

noun

  • 1British A chocolate-flavoured biscuit with a chocolate-cream filling.

    • ‘The teen said he was given bread and water four times during his ordeal, adding that he was once given a pack of Bourbon biscuits for the entire day.’
    • ‘For our ‘International’ bake sale I was idly toying with the idea of making some Bourbons.’
    • ‘I find my self somewhat underwhelmed. I often feel that I'm missing the point with the Bourbon biscuit and by rights should like it a lot more than I do.’
    • ‘Other types of BISCUITS include BATH OLIVERS, WATER BISCUITS, BOURBONS and DIGESTIVES.’
    • ‘The Bourbon was introduced in 1910.’
  • 2US A reactionary.

    • ‘The Bourbon period set off growing violence and lynch mobs as illegal forms of control, introducing what he calls the most brutal system of punishment in U.S. history.’
    • ‘His point was that Bourbons would take any votes they could get, but they were socially repulsed by the poor, both African American and white.’
    • ‘The Bourbons strove to control the state's economic machinery and to maintain white supremacy.’
    • ‘In the view of Independents and Greenbackers, the Bourbons had ceased to be a democratic party when they resorted to ballot-box stuffing to maintain statewide political control.’
    • ‘It was, according to one observer, ‘part of the old feud between the Bourbon and the Redneck.’’
    • ‘Some historians say populism failed because southern Bourbons were able to exploit racial fears and antagonisms and thus split the movement in half in its core region.’
    • ‘He wanted to share what he had learned touring the state and bear witness to what he considered the Bourbons ' rape of democratic principles in the August election.’
    • ‘While he and a substantial minority opposed the use of force in America, the majority rallied to the government and this increased when the absolutist Bourbon powers intervened.’
  • 3A rose of a variety which flowers over a long period and has a rich scent. It arose as a natural hybrid on the island of Réunion (formerly Île de Bourbon) and was introduced into Europe in the early 19th century.

    • ‘If you're looking for a medium-sized bush for borders, four-foot-tall Madame Isaac Pereire, a blowsy Bourbon rose with arching canes full of opulent purplish-pink flowers is deliciously fragrant and reblooms throughout the summer.’
    • ‘On June 18, 2002 I placed two blooms from my garden of the Bourbon rose, Rosa ‘La Reine Victoria’, on my flatbed scanner.’
    • ‘‘Souvenir de la Malmaison’ is the essential Bourbon, richly scented blush-pink voluminous ballgown flowers.’
    • ‘Given the study name ‘Fairmount Proserpine,’ the charmer is very likely an early Bourbon rose, quite possibly the rare cultivar ‘Proserpine’ introduced in 1841.’
    • ‘If you've seen Victorian wallpaper scattered with fullblown roses then you know what a Bourbon rose looks like.’
    • ‘Over the next decade the Dutch and British East India Companies brought back dozens of new China roses, leading to the development of Teas, Bourbons, and Portlands.’
    • ‘Among the antique roses, Bourbons, Kordes, and Hybrid Perpetuals are the most prone to black spot.’
    • ‘Outside, the box partitions are now planted with peonies and old roses such as Bourbon and Banksiae.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (in Bourbon (sense 2 of the noun)): from Bourbon. Bourbon (sense 1 of the noun) dates from the 1930s.

Pronunciation

Bourbon

/ˈbʊəb(ə)n/