Definition of boundary in English:

boundary

noun

  • 1A line which marks the limits of an area; a dividing line.

    ‘a county boundary’
    ‘the river marks the boundary between the two regions’
    [as modifier] ‘a boundary wall’
    • ‘The boundary line for private properties is usually where the sandy area ends and the vegetation begins.’
    • ‘The line came to be regarded as marking the northern boundary of the area where agriculture could be safely pursued.’
    • ‘As I understand it, not so long ago, Oxford Street marked its northern boundary.’
    • ‘Grey weathered posts, with white ant mounds creeping up around them, mark the boundary.’
    • ‘A ball of light suddenly appeared on top of the massive wall marking the boundary of the city.’
    • ‘To the west of this is Chile, with the border marking the western boundary of the national park.’
    • ‘The decision to draw the boundary according to county lines made little social, economic, or geographical sense.’
    • ‘Meandering through the Oxfordshire countryside, the river marks the eastern boundary of the public part of the garden.’
    • ‘Work is going on all this week at the club to bring down the poplars, which line the eastern boundary of the course alongside the first hole.’
    • ‘Lay a hose or piece of rope on the ground to mark the boundary of your planting area, and plant within it.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, the boundary ditches mark a significant moment in the long history of the valley.’
    • ‘This street marks the boundary between the old and new districts of the city.’
    • ‘Ten points are agreed as the turning points of the boundary line.’
    • ‘Ropes will be required to mark out the boundary of the area as well as each plot.’
    • ‘An old stone wall marks the boundary of the plot to one side, while a rocky hill and concrete wall flanks the other.’
    • ‘Accordingly it might well be held to mark the boundary of Australia's continental shelf.’
    • ‘There were fields beyond Scots Lane to the north and the cathedral marked the southern boundary.’
    • ‘In the picture above, the blue lines mark the boundary of the infected region.’
    • ‘A high wooded ridge that runs southward from the mouth of the Orne marked the boundary of the triangle to be held.’
    • ‘You know, the neighbors are one meter away, across a river or across a boundary line.’
    bounds, confines, limits, outer limits, extremities, margins, edges, fringes
    border, frontier, borderline, partition, dividing line, bounding line
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A limit of something abstract, especially a subject or sphere of activity.
      ‘a community without class or political boundaries’
      • ‘We have eliminated traditional boundaries and made the proposition much clearer for shoppers.’
      • ‘Both governments have pushed the boundaries of political advertising before.’
      • ‘In this way, video game turfs serve to mark boundaries and borders for methods of exploration and play.’
      • ‘While the jet set rule the grounds, genuine golf lovers cut across class boundaries.’
      • ‘Using indigenous and interesting sounds we are constantly prodding at the boundaries of rock and roll.’
      • ‘The list is incomplete, for the boundaries of the subject are steadily expanding.’
      • ‘It does not encourage drawing those sorts of abstract internal boundaries.’
      • ‘If we do away with the old subject boundaries and hierarchies and exams we open places of education up to people of all ages, all abilities.’
      • ‘Russell explains that Bacon sought to blur the boundaries between representation and abstraction.’
      • ‘Wealth also can be important in marking social boundaries in rural areas.’
      • ‘The annihilation of the dinosaurs marks the boundary linking Cretaceous time and Tertiary time.’
      • ‘Networks may cut across social class boundaries and they may also reveal differences within social classes.’
      • ‘Secondly, job security has also crossed traditional class boundaries in the last twenty years.’
      • ‘Drawing on that, the director has cast his Don adrift on the stage, breaking out of the boundaries of the traditional set.’
      • ‘Melancholy is not the only vehicle through which the traditional boundaries between male and female are examined.’
      • ‘The issue of global warming is one that cuts across all political and social boundaries.’
      • ‘Globalization studies is emerging as a new field that cuts across traditional disciplinary boundaries.’
      • ‘That debate cut across all boundaries, be they family, social or political.’
      • ‘There's a place where boys perhaps wisely fear to tread, somewhere where the boundaries of rock and jazz blur.’
      • ‘What I study does not fit into the traditional boundaries of sociological knowledge.’
  • 2Cricket
    A hit crossing the limits of the field, scoring four or six runs.

    • ‘When he stroked a cover-drive to the fence, one of six boundaries, we realised that he had overcome the pain.’
    • ‘Scott Styris cashed in too, quite literally - picking off boundaries through and over midwicket at will.’
    • ‘I seemed to score a lot of boundaries and it doesn't always happen that way.’
    • ‘Then he could score a few boundaries early on and the pressure would be off him.’
    • ‘He struck five hefty boundaries, including three successive fours.’
    • ‘Hayden then plays and misses, before scoring a lucky boundary off his thigh-pad.’
    • ‘There was a century for the taking, but he refused to think about that, constantly looking to innovate and score boundaries.’
    • ‘After two boundaries he was caught behind off Friedlander and the students felt they could make further inroads.’
    • ‘Though never at his best, Crawley still managed four boundaries in his 36 off 81 balls.’
    • ‘Nasser Hussain announced himself with a majestic cover drive for a boundary.’
    • ‘Weston went briefly on the rampage, hitting four boundaries in two overs, before settling down again.’
    • ‘Fleming broke the shackles with four handsome off-driven boundaries in the space of two overs.’
    • ‘His 49 took 71 balls with only three boundaries after a glorious cover drive to the first ball he faced.’
    • ‘Harvey had faced 45 balls, plundering eight fours and three sixes, and no-one else had scored a boundary.’
    • ‘Neil Fairbrother also looked in good form, hitting Brown for four boundaries until he went caught and bowled.’
    • ‘Both were aggressive during their stand, scoring in boundaries that did not stop even when the spinners came on to stem the flow of runs.’
    • ‘Both struck four boundaries apiece and hustled the singles with a great deal of urgency.’
    • ‘Flower was hardly troubled by the bowling, creaming boundaries through the off side and running the singles hard.’
    • ‘What's the highest score anyone has made in a first-class match entirely in boundaries?’
    • ‘Lehmann suppressed his natural attacking game and it was not until his 20th over at the crease that he scored his first boundary.’

Origin

Early 17th century: variant of dialect bounder, from bound + -er, perhaps on the pattern of limitary.

Pronunciation:

boundary

/ˈbaʊnd(ə)ri/