Definition of bouncy castle in English:

bouncy castle

noun

British
  • A large inflatable structure, typically in the form of a stylized castle or other building, on which children can jump and play.

    • ‘Events on the day included pony and fairground rides, children's entertainers and fun stalls and bouncy castles.’
    • ‘The bouncy castle, complete with tunnels, hidey-holes and windows, is a particular hit.’
    • ‘The camps offer activities including bouncy castles, mini tennis, games, swimming, football, trampolining, gymnastics, dance, arts and crafts, music, quizzes and videos.’
    • ‘There were the usual bouncy castles, an inflatable slide and fairground rides, but children could also enjoy a magical show, a Punch and Judy show, a visit to see the pygmy goats, a ride on a tractor and many other attractions.’
    • ‘He said: ‘We offer everything from bouncy castles to trestle tables, PA systems to collection buckets.’’
    • ‘The fun begins at 12 noon with a mini soccer tournament, bouncy castles, inflatable shoot out, cartoon characters, face painting, stilt samba band, assault course and much more.’
    • ‘Old English traditional pastimes such as skittles, a coconut shy and pony rides were on offer to the public alongside the more modern entertainments including bouncy castles and a football penalty shoot-out.’
    • ‘Two bouncy castle businesses have had inflatables stolen in an identical sting on the same day.’
    • ‘A ride on Scarborough's donkeys may not provide the kind of white-knuckle thrill offered by brasher resorts whose beaches are littered with bouncy castles and fairground equipment.’
    • ‘Children jumped with joy following the delivery of a bouncy castle bought with money raised by an extreme sports group.’
    • ‘As well as bouncy castles, there was the nylon zoo with a huge inflatable animal (a frog on Saturday and a turtle on Sunday).’
    • ‘He said: ‘That said, it will be a shame that it could be knocked down for housing, because they always used to have bouncy castles in there in the summer for the kids.’’
    • ‘As well as the usual horse and dog shows, there were activities for children including bouncy castles, rodeo rides and inflatable slides.’
    • ‘I assumed the day wouldn't be resplendent with bunting, bouncy castles, candy floss and ferret racing, but had trouble visualising how anyone would tactfully suggest visiting to their loved ones.’
    • ‘‘The funfair has bouncy castles, merry-go-rounds and swings which are providing facilities for play and social interaction for children,’ she said.’
    • ‘In keeping with the theme, there was a medieval arena with jousting displays, chariot races and archery contests as well as more modern attractions such as a fairground and bouncy castles.’
    • ‘The children, aged six months to eight years, visited animals, went on pony rides, jumped around on bouncy castles, took part in an egg box decorating competition, and got balloons, party hats, stickers and yo-yos to take home.’
    • ‘There was a bouncy castle, fairground and a car boot sale, and youngsters were also able to try out their riding skills on quad bikes.’
    • ‘It's like bouncy castles for grown-ups with a lot of water involved too.’
    • ‘For the young there were traditional merry-go-round rides, bouncy castles and fun houses and for the older gala-goers some rides that were certainly not for the faint hearted.’