Definition of bordure in English:

bordure

noun

Heraldry
  • A broad border used as a charge in a coat of arms, often as a mark of difference.

    • ‘When these three charges are taken up, there is some hesitation as to the next step: a bordure gules bezanty is used, then a bordure engrailed.’
    • ‘The bordures themselves were often dimidiated or even quartered and various lines of partition were used, so that the inside of the bordure might be engrailed or wavy.’
    • ‘The Scots, today, are the major cheerleaders for cadency, and, indeed, the modern Scots system is most elaborate, involving the use of differently tinctured bordures and changing the lines of the bordures to differentiate one man from another.’
    • ‘When used in an impaled coat the bordure is not continued around the inner side.’
    • ‘In addition to our current catalogue, our bordures which we produce upon special orders with the desired colour, shape and dimensions are as strong and durable as natural marble bordure or ceramic bordures.’
    • ‘Taking notice of the similarities between the bordures of the stained glass window, those in Assisi and in the Duomo of Orvieto, further analogies in the choice of the colors and in the draping, she carries on the thesis that the work was realized by an Umbrian Master glazier.’
    • ‘In the last century a complicated system or differencing by bordures was propounded by Stoddart to allow for cadet arms, but although giving a conceptual framework, this has in practice been more honoured in the breach than in the observance.’
    • ‘The orle is a narrow bordure following the exact outline of the shield, but within it, showing the field between the outer edge of the orle and the edge of the shield.’

Origin

Late Middle English: variant of border.

Pronunciation:

bordure

/ˈbɔːdjʊə/