Definition of borage in English:

borage

noun

  • A European herbaceous plant with bright blue flowers and hairy leaves, which is attractive to bees.

    Borago officinalis, family Boraginaceae (the borage family). This family includes many plants that typically have blue or purple flowers, including forget-me-not, comfrey, bugloss, and alkanet

    • ‘Coriander, oregano, camomile, and borage are both blue and white flowered and if happy self-seed all over the place.’
    • ‘Candied borage flowers make beautiful decorations for cakes and pastries, and it's easy to do.’
    • ‘Painted Ladies, which instinctively lay their eggs on thistle plants, also find an acceptable substitute in the hairy leaves of borage.’
    • ‘Other flower petal choices are rose, nasturtium, borage, dandelions and violets.’
    • ‘This is simply an extension of the local habit of continually wandering about tweaking bits of tasty food off the hillsides: wild asparagus, mushrooms, fennel, borage, wild garlic, lemons.’
    • ‘A member of the borage family, common heliotrope is one of about 250 Heliotropium species, but it is the only one widely grown in gardens.’
    • ‘Imagine my delight then when I popped into the organic shop and saw not only bountiful bags of salad but salad with flowers, the edible kind like nasturtiums, borage, wild pansies and pot marigolds.’
    • ‘Try fennel for the Anise Swallowtail; lupine for blues; hollyhocks and borage for the Painted Lady; and grasses for satyrs and skippers.’
    • ‘This oil is derived from the seeds of the borage plant.’
    • ‘We've got hawthorn, gingko, elder, mullein, lavender, sage, thyme, echinacea, borage, yarrow and plenty of pine trees.’
    • ‘If you experience the redness and flaking of chronic dry skin, dermatitis, and eczema, get to know borage oil, extracted from the borage plant.’
    • ‘The wild olive is a member of the borage family that matures to about 20 feet in height and has a rounded crown on a short trunk.’
    • ‘The motorway verges and embankments have been sown with wildflower seed which are now producing traditional meadow plants, including borage, primula and oxeye daisies.’
    • ‘Collect herb flowers such as borage and chamomile just before full flowering.’
    • ‘Adventurous herbalists like to experiment with basil, oregano and rosemary, also including the more exotic plants like sweet woodruff, lemon grass and borage.’
    • ‘Begin planting borage or marigold with your potatoes and notice the difference it makes.’
    • ‘Some 3 percent of all flowering plants produce these chemicals, including such herbal-garden favorites as borage and comfrey.’
    • ‘Edible flowers such as nasturtium, calendula, and borage do well at the base.’
    • ‘I haven't yet done anything with my borage because, well, neither the flowers nor the leaves taste like much of anything, and the stalks are stingy and unpleasant to the touch.’
    • ‘Sprinkle with chopped mint or coriander and some bright petals - calendula, borage, courgette flowers or anything edible.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French bourrache, from medieval Latin borrago, perhaps from Arabic 'abū ḥurāš ‘father of roughness’ (referring to the leaves).

Pronunciation

borage

/ˈbɒrɪdʒ/