Main definitions of bop in English

: bop1bop2

bop1

noun

informal
  • 1British A dance to pop music:

    ‘nightlife is good, whether you're looking for a drink or a bop in the disco’
    • ‘Gloria and her husband still enjoy a bit of a bop and a jive.’
    • ‘Cool was the bop in your step, the pearl in your cap, the cigarette dangling from your lip.’
    • ‘His particular passion is a form of swing dancing known as beach bop.’
    • ‘We chatted for a while, had a bop, drank a few more beers and I was contemplating the bus ride home when I noticed a very handsome man had just arrived.’
    • ‘I just want to get dressed up, meet my friends, have a laugh, have a bop and not worry about that bleeper.’
    1. 1.1 An organized social occasion with dancing to pop music:
      ‘colleges extend a welcoming hand through buffets and bops’
      • ‘The absence of a designated fire exit created a potentially dangerous situation in the JCR, which had been used frequently to host college bops.’
      • ‘Surely with these simple features, throwing a bop would be easy.’
      • ‘Tickets for the bop will be on sale in the bar on Thursday 6th between 9pm and 11pm.’
      • ‘One bystander said he was ‘angry and obviously upset, adding his wife was at the bop dancing with people’.’
      • ‘The fortnightly bops have been subject to complaints in the past both from residents and other colleges including Hertford.’
      • ‘At the end of term bop the pair approached Morrison to find out why they had been named in her email.’
      • ‘This can be anything from organising a bop or running a society to setting up an IT firm.’
      • ‘The second year inhabitants of the house, who asked not to be named, discovered the break-in upon returning from a bop.’
      • ‘He also stated that he enjoyed bops because they are ‘a great opportunity for college sanctioned nudity’.’
      • ‘I have neither the energy for a Buffy-themed Halloween bop, nor a cast party that will start at 2 am (after the set and lights are dismantled).’
      • ‘And it led me to consider a thought I had back at the last bop.’
      • ‘Perhaps the Oxford student looks to find greater gratification at the end-of-term bop or in the classic ‘entertainment’ offered by a night of Comic Relief, rather than ninety minutes in the cold and a decidedly dodgy hotdog.’
      • ‘Revellers can now celebrate the coming of the New Year with a bop, after politicians cleared away antiquated legislation in time for this Sunday's festivities.’
      discotheque
      View synonyms
  • 2

    short for bebop
    • ‘Chet's was an economical, West Coast jazz style, unlike the hard bop of the East Coast which was much harder, faster and higher.’
    • ‘It's got a bop feel in the walking bass and the vibe hits, but the three singers find a whole new way to construct post-rock eeriness.’
    • ‘The chameleonic Ribot shines in this setting with his unsurprisingly individual take on the bop guitar tradition.’
    • ‘Throughout, Metheny's guitar (often fitted with a strangely saxophone-like sound) battles it out with Ornette's alto in an edgy exchange of riffs, tumbling bop phrases and squeals.’
    • ‘His tone tended to be hard and harsh and lacked the varied coloration of the bop innovator Charlie Parker.’
    • ‘Ninesense was lead by sax player Dean, whose long association with Soft Machine paralleled a solo career that mixed post bop, free jazz and rock influences.’
    • ‘Originally of the hard bop school, Ayers embraced the strains of black music coming from the radio, incorporating more R&B smoothness and disco push into his jazz-based playing.’
    • ‘An awesome bandleader, Eckstine first fronted a bop big band with musicians who established the vocabulary of modern jazz.’
    • ‘While Mazurek's early recordings showcased his ability as a player of straight bop inflected jazz, since then his concern seems to have been to strip away the extraneous.’
    • ‘These harmonies, however, fit into the jazz idiom just as bop made its way into the mainstream, enriching both.’
    • ‘Everyone, including the characters, are better served by the hard bop than this bluesy, shapeless jazz, with its rare but painful false notes.’
    • ‘Instead of advancing the case of hard bop like Blakey, he wanted to build bridges between rock, soul and jazz.’
    • ‘The section ends almost whimsically with the band fixating upon a repeated bop riff and then finishing with an extended atonal blast.’
    • ‘By the time she is stomping to ‘You're So Square’ or bringing the bop with the magnificent Mingus track ‘God Must Be a Boogie Man,’ she has won us over.’
    • ‘But even when Chenaux is plucking out his excellent tension, the rest of the band generally keeps it cool and hip on the bop tip.’
    • ‘So it's not surprising that after leading the cutting edge within soul jazz & hard bop, very little new ground has been broken since the 1960s and 70s.’
    • ‘His newest project, Ronnie Artur and his Orkestrio, is a faux bop, finger-snapping version of white jazz cool and spoken word collaboration.’
    • ‘As the Vandermark reference suggests, what makes this band a joy to listen to is that they are part of that fraction of the jazz world that is not afraid to combine the energies unleashed by both bop and free jazz in a joyous mix.’
    • ‘But his self-appointed mission to restore to jazz a cultural-political clout it had in the first bop era and in the free-jazz of the 1960s makes him something considerably bigger.’
    • ‘This collection dates from 1958, a period when hard bop & soul jazz were dominant in the contemporary jazz arena, and the roots of such music (the blues and gospel) are evident here.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • 1 Dance to pop music:

    ‘everyone was bopping until the small hours’
    • ‘In no time, everyone was singing and bopping along to their two singles.’
    • ‘Inside it's split over three levels and more hectic, with weekend clubbers cramming in to bop and bounce to everything from house to hip-hop.’
    • ‘Their brand of pop rock with balls can still make you jump up and down and bop along.’
    • ‘According to Bu-Ah-Kui's chatelaine, Hsiao Shu-hua, the place is bopping until three or four in the morning, serving up a stunning variety of conventional and exotic foods.’
    • ‘Licensing magistrates granted a Section 77 to the riverside pub, giving drinkers a chance to stay there until the witching hour three days a week, with the chance to bop on the dance floor or guzzle the substantial food.’
    • ‘Dad used to say I would bop to the beat on all fours when I was a baby.’
    • ‘Brian stuck some nineties dance music on and everyone was soon bopping around like idiots.’
    • ‘I had always liked bopping around at student discos - now I was graduating as a true clubber.’
    • ‘But there he was in her living room bopping along to the music in an absurd little dance the likes of which she hadn't seen since high school.’
    • ‘Bars keep bopping until three or four in the morning, but those who want to dance the night away can keep going until sunrise at one of the nightclubs or discos in the town.’
    • ‘These were barely needed as soon everyone was down in the basement bopping on the dance floor or bobbing in the dark room.’
    • ‘On the disco floor, she energetically bumped, rocked and bopped; I tripped, stumbled and flopped.’
    • ‘The entire crowd was in a constant groove, heads bopping and legs kicking up doing the twist, swing dancing, and just plain old quaking and shaking.’
    • ‘Audience members can't avoid the urge to dance after watching the band bop around on stage, in time to the good ol' cow tunes.’
    • ‘The crowd seemed to enjoy the band's set, with many at the stage front dancing and bopping around.’
    • ‘Clubbers bopped on the open air, split-level dance floor until the early hours of the morning.’
    • ‘Hear your song come on and you start bopping and dancing.’
    • ‘Over 1,000 people bopped, jigged, jived and pogoed to some excellent bands.’
    • ‘In 1985, aged 20, she met her future husband while bopping on the dance floor and they were married four years later.’
    • ‘This is the room that Graham's been quietly making over this past week and a bit, while bopping away to a succession of CDs.’
    dance, jig, leap, jump, skip, bounce
    boogie, jive, groove, disco, rock, pogo, mosh, stomp, hoof it
    get down, shake one's booty, cut a rug, cut the rug, slam-dance
    step it
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Move or travel energetically:
      ‘entrepreneurial types bopping around Italy’
      • ‘Too bad we're starting to move that week or I would bop on down to this great show in a sunny land that knows not snow.’
      • ‘Friday's traditional end-of-year concert saw around 75 youngsters strut their stuff on stage before bopping along to a disco.’
      • ‘I bopped around telling everyone that THIS WAS THE BEST MUSIC EVER MADE.’
      • ‘Bargain hunters were able to shop and bop until they dropped as the sweet sound of a 100-voice choir singing a cappella filled The Lowry Designer Outlet at Salford Quays.’
      • ‘It's time to put recent hurts firmly and finally behind you--life's bopping along quite nicely right now, and this week won't make waves if you don't.’
      • ‘One of the nurses of the ward, a tall woman whose social life rests with her three kids - yep, even I've seen the awful pictures - bops up to the foot of my bed.’
      • ‘I started on the second floor and made my way up to the fourth, at a fairly quick pace, weaving and bopping around the crowd.’
      • ‘The two leaned against the bar in awkward silence until Claire came bopping over.’
      • ‘More importantly, there are some great energetic tunes here that you can bop around to.’
      • ‘With the radio tuned to an all-oldies station, they bopped across town and onto the Narrows Bridge.’
      • ‘He did a Gary dance, and bopped joyfully along the sidewalk and across the street toward my house.’

Origin

1940s: shortening of bebop.

Pronunciation:

bop

/bɒp/

Main definitions of bop in English

: bop1bop2

bop2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • Hit or punch quickly:

    ‘Rex bopped him on the head’
    • ‘The ball is slightly out of air because our school is too cheap to buy air pumps, and it keeps bopping my hard skull today.’
    • ‘Okay, it's at this point when you bop me on my head for being stupid.’
    • ‘Bopping them over the head with a James Bond drop-kick does not do much for anyone, other than stirring up more aggression in a potentially very aggressive situation.’
    • ‘The police had a relationship with these guys and they couldn't just arrest them and bop them on the head.’
    • ‘Too little force in the swing and the axe is liable to bounce back and bop you on the nose.’
    • ‘This gave me time to bop him on the nose to get him off me and hastily escape before he came back for more.’
    • ‘She bopped the flowers on his head, but making sure it didn't ruin them.’
    • ‘At the height of the craze, I stood on the North Bank at Highbury in a forest of bananas, watching awestruck as they celebrated another goal going in by either bopping your neighbour over the head, or simply chucking the thing in the air.’
    • ‘Down comes the Goddess Isis, and she says, ‘Little God Anubis, I don't want to see you picking up the field mice and bopping them on the head.’’
    • ‘Is it surprising that he has bopped a paparazzo on the nose?’
    • ‘They could bop me on the head and pinch the whole lot.’
    • ‘Better than smile beatifically, she should have bopped him on the noggin with the nearest ornament.’
    • ‘Perhaps he had met and dated some Asian women who had pandered to this stereotype for him, but it's still hard not to want to bop someone on the head who thinks this way.’
    • ‘In a bizarre scene during a popular costume race at Milwaukee Brewers games, he bopped a woman dressed as a huge Italian sausage with a bat and was booked for misdemeanor battery.’
    • ‘Section 43 of the Canadian Criminal code allows adults to bop naughty children.’
    • ‘Oi, you at the back, stop muttering ‘no change there’ before I come over and bop you.’
    • ‘She slipped and fell and bopped her nose off a rock.’
    • ‘It's just too tiring to bop somebody on the nose.’
    • ‘It seems the whole jungle community is counting on master sleuth Scott to find El Gato so they can promptly bop him on the head and steal it from him.’
    • ‘I did try to help by folding his knees under him, but all that did was unbalance him and he ended up bopping the carpet with his nose.’

noun

informal
  • A quick blow or punch.

    • ‘A sudden harsh wind blowing off the moor, an inattentive owner — no worries there — and off she'd blow, perhaps with a brief bop on the head with a flagpole for good measure.’
    • ‘After a quick bop on the head, poor Fred becomes docile and co-operative.’
    • ‘Fundi persistently approached the mound, but even little Gimli gave him a bop on the head when he attempted to join in the fishing.’
    • ‘I told Kathryn to stay in her routine, then gave her a bop on the head with my yardage book and told her not to think too much.’
    • ‘You deserve a bop on the nose.’

Origin

1930s (originally US): imitative.

Pronunciation:

bop

/bɒp/