Definition of boondie in English:

boondie

noun

Australian
  • A stone.

    ‘loose boondies shifted under the wide-tyred wheels’
    • ‘There was a yard full of boondies, just perfect for throwing.’
    • ‘Any bird of prey that happened to fly over one's urban air space copped a barrage of sticks and boondies.’
    • ‘A small sheet of steel mesh offered some small measure of protection from the thousands of tonnes of boondies.’
    • ‘Hey, look at all the boondies in this pile—let's hide behind it and throw 'em at your sister!’
    • ‘We flung boondies at each other in the vacant lots of new developments.’
    • ‘Growing up in the bush, we threw boondies at all sorts of targets.’
    • ‘There were always kids up one end of the street throwing boondies or chasing someone's dog.’
    • ‘See that bastard, practising grenade-throwing with bits of boondies—I done that many a time!’
    • ‘Grandpa's always chucking boondies at Grandma's grave.’
    • ‘Sometimes they clustered so thickly on the stocks that by hurling boondies we could knock them down and take them home to be made into pie.’
    rock, pebble, boulder
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s: origin unknown; perhaps from a Western Australian Aboriginal language.

Pronunciation

boondie

/ˈbuːndi/