Definition of book in English:

book

noun

  • 1A written or printed work consisting of pages glued or sewn together along one side and bound in covers.

    ‘a book of selected poems’
    • ‘Rosie bought me the DVD along with a book on philosophy.’
    • ‘He didn't want to get in more trouble, and just opened a book, trying to concentrate and read it silently.’
    • ‘So he launched a new company which packaged the software in paperback book format and charged lower prices.’
    • ‘Modern books and CDs are often shoddy objects, victims of corporate economies.’
    • ‘I opened a book and quickly skimmed information about the first World War.’
    • ‘I get up and stretch out my stiff muscles and take the bookmark and put it in the book on the page I was reading.’
    • ‘I was a bit discouraged with the rest of the book after such a wonderful introduction.’
    • ‘The first work of mine to be published in a book wasn't a short story or a novel.’
    • ‘The resource books provided are well recognized as being excellent in their area.’
    • ‘Solving an author's puzzles can be one of the most rewarding things about cracking open a book.’
    • ‘When he retired he wrote a book on medical science for lay people and prospective doctors.’
    • ‘After some serious research he wrote a book on the subject, Ancient Mosaics in Bulgaria.’
    • ‘She pictures a woman lying gloomily on the couch reading a book about Maria Callas.’
    • ‘The council said there will also be an extra £100,000 for the library book fund.’
    • ‘I sat there a while longer, staring down at the vellum pages of the book on the low desk before me.’
    • ‘If one opens the book at random, it is this multitude of references that catches the eye.’
    • ‘Anthologies of writing and small art books will be available for sale online.’
    • ‘He cherished some lovely old books containing the folk songs and traditional ballads of our land.’
    • ‘You can do so by reading books and informing yourself, which is an aspect that should not be overlooked.’
    • ‘At any rate, objectivity should be the guiding factor while writing history books, past or present.’
    • ‘It's pretty sad, actually… most of my friends haven't opened a book for pleasure in years.’
    volume, tome, work, printed work, publication, title, opus, treatise
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A literary composition that is published or intended for publication as a book.
      ‘he's writing a book about his experiences’
      • ‘The best films nearly always come from original scripts or second-rate books.’
      • ‘The firm continued to publish books, and there was talk of opening a bookshop.’
      • ‘I love mixing genres, writing essays and kids' books and short stories as well as poems.’
      • ‘I wrote my first book on spec, sent it off to nearly 100 publishers and in six weeks I had my first offer.’
      • ‘He had just published a book of his life story, and it had become a best seller.’
      • ‘Second, don't open a book with a prologue, because you're wasting time.’
      • ‘Merely getting books published serves little purpose if no one reads them.’
      • ‘Writing books about how to make a fortune on the Internet seems like a great method.’
      • ‘Henry Miller had published seventeen books when he sent out an appeal to all his friends to help him out.’
      • ‘He has claimed that he never wanted to be a novelist despite the fact the he has published so many books.’
      • ‘I used to do photography seriously, and even wrote a book on photography in schools back in the seventies.’
      • ‘Tell me about why you write stories and how you came to write a novel rather than a book of short stories.’
      • ‘She is currently at work on a literary thriller and a book of short stories based on her travels’
      • ‘His drawings are also found in travel books and the stories of operas by Richard Wagner.’
      • ‘The book, published in an edition of 6,000 copies on 19 December, sold out in a few days.’
      • ‘Another, working on a novel for young adults, already has books published in that field.’
      • ‘Who is it that decides which novels, biographies, poetry and children's books do get published?’
      • ‘I have recently spent many months writing a book on hypnosis for the British Medical Association.’
      • ‘He likes classical music and books about people who die and come back to life.’
      • ‘As the publication dates indicate these books are not the fruit of deep or new research.’
      work, publication, novel, composition, piece, creation, opus
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A main division of a literary work or of the Bible.
      ‘the Book of Genesis’
      • ‘There are also rough translations of other books of the Bible, currently used for teaching purposes.’
      • ‘There are many commentaries on individual books of the Bible, but the reader who wishes to take a broader view has less choice.’
      • ‘He makes that claim in a short essay on the gospel of Luke in Revelations, a collection of personal responses to books of the Bible.’
      • ‘Bryan never went into a frenzy, nor did he recite the books of the Bible.’
      • ‘There are some books of the Bible whose authors cannot be known completely.’
      • ‘As a theologian he is most famous for his practical work in revising the order of the books of the Bible and arranging them into chapters.’
      • ‘I found the list he had made of the books of the Bible in the drawer of his bedside table.’
      • ‘The book of Esther is the only book of the Bible that does not contain the name of God.’
      • ‘And not only does the book of Proverbs have this potential, but almost all the books of the Bible.’
      • ‘Of course, and that truth is preserved in the 66 books of the Bible, Old and New Testaments.’
      • ‘Esther is one of the most neglected books of the Old Testament, certainly as far as commentaries are concerned.’
      • ‘The New Testament contains the books that provide the basis for modern Christianity.’
      • ‘As many have noted, the very last words of the last book of the Jewish Bible end on a similar note.’
      • ‘God always dictated the Torah, as well as other books of the Bible, in the language used by the people at the time.’
      • ‘When Jerome started work there were already Latin translations of many of the books of the Bible.’
      • ‘However, in the textual criticism of the books of Scripture this is problematic in several ways.’
      • ‘In the 2nd Century AD the first four books of the New Testament were known as gospels.’
      • ‘Of the 42 books of the Bible that Shakespeare drew upon, Ecclesiasticus and Job seem to have been his favourites.’
      • ‘Set up to follow the order of the books of the Bible, these photos and texts run from Creation to Revelation!’
      • ‘Some readers of the Bible consider the book of Hebrews to be a description of a faith journey.’
    3. 1.3 The libretto of a musical or opera, or the script of a play.
      • ‘Keira took out the script book that she hadn't yet returned to the handbag.’
      text, screenplay, libretto, lyrics, score, lines, parts, dialogue, words, manuscript
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4one's books Used to refer to studying.
      ‘he was so deep in his books he would forget to eat’
      • ‘On one of those seemingly endless summer days he was poring over his books in the library.’
      • ‘Many students, sweating over their books, have dreamt of taking a relaxing nap in one of the beautiful forest clearings.’
      • ‘And there is naturally also a limit to how many hours they can be poring over their books after many hours at school and three hours of homework.’
      • ‘But he never wallowed in self pity, and rather spent every available moment with his nose stuck deep in his books.’
      • ‘The campus has plenty of spots for students tired of slaving over their books in the library or dorms to get some fresh air.’
    5. 1.5the book The telephone directory for the area in which someone lives.
      ‘is your name in the book?’
      • ‘New customers who found our number in the book would get the message ‘the number you reached is not in service.’’
      • ‘Apart from in 2006/7, we are members of the Offa's Dyke Association, find us in the book, or the online entry they have for us.’
      • ‘Mum told me his surname, and I looked him up in the book, and called him, but his mum told me he was out so I left a message.’
      • ‘We are not a secret organisation, but out of necessity you will not find us in the book.’
      • ‘And if you have fond memories of a special teacher, why not look them up in the book and say ‘thanks’ one more time?’
    6. 1.6dated, informal A magazine.
      ‘women's books like Cosmopolitan and Ladies' Home Journal’
      ‘Charlotte's mother always called magazines ‘books’’
      • ‘Their readers nearly always referred to these magazines as 'books'.’
      • ‘Money meant that no one laughed behind her back when she called magazines books.’
      • ‘Some older readers still refer to their magazines as 'books'.’
      • ‘'I read it in a book.' 'What book?' 'Vogue, that's what book.'’
      journal, publication, periodical, paper, proceedings
      View synonyms
    7. 1.7 An imaginary record or list (often used to emphasize the comprehensiveness of someone's actions or experience)
      ‘she felt every emotion in the book of love’
      • ‘Whether or not ‘long distance’ relationships can work is one of those age-old questions in the book of love.’
      • ‘The way he receives his partner in his hotel room wouldn't count among ‘nice and friendly’ in the book of etiquette.’
      • ‘There is a little known secret in the book of relationships, filed under the chapter on breaking up and I am here to share it.’
  • 2with modifier A bound set of blank sheets for writing in.

    ‘an accounts book’
    • ‘She leaned back against her pillows and tapped her pen against the leather bound book.’
    • ‘DocSearcher doesn't search my email, my address book entries or my browser history.’
    • ‘That brought to mind the leather bound book that she had borrowed from the library.’
    • ‘Colouring books can occupy a child quietly for a while.’
    • ‘She reached into one of her few bags, and pulled out a leather bound book, and began to read.’
    • ‘On his return from the war, he transcribed the diaries into ledger books, filling in gaps from memory.’
    • ‘The three of them then turned to look at the subject of their topic, just in time to see a grey address book fall out with a thud.’
    • ‘He pulled a heavy, leather bound book off from a high shelf, and cracked it open gently.’
    • ‘Maura gave him a puzzled glance but closed the account book and made her way to the entrance.’
    • ‘As the reading went on, a guy sitting down in front of me drew an impressionistic sketch into a handmade blank book.’
    • ‘She also added two leather bound books to the bag, one was blank but the other was full of spells that Olivia might need for the journey to the Wastes.’
    • ‘Before he could finish his sentence, Cass drew a green account book from a shelf to the side.’
    • ‘It's much more difficult to find a coloring book image of a crawdad than one would think.’
    • ‘She put the account book away and walked out to the site where they had been attacked.’
    • ‘He was marking exam papers when by chance he found a blank page in a candidate's answer book.’
    • ‘Verona, our daughter, had completed the bicycling clown in her colouring book and was bored.’
    • ‘I went over to this podium in the corner which had a large ledger book opened up on it.’
    • ‘The Narrator looked up from the leather bound book he was reading from; tears were coursing from his eyes.’
    • ‘She spotted Joel propped up against the wall, reading a thick, leather bound book.’
    • ‘As the man walked towards Pierre a man came from the back holding a huge old leather bound book.’
    notepad, notebook, pad, memo pad, exercise book, binder
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1books A set of records or accounts.
      ‘a bid to balance the books’
      • ‘The council said the extra 29 million it has been given will be soaked up by education and there is simply not enough money to balance the books.’
      • ‘But now it is understood senior officers say they cannot keep using reserves to balance the books.’
      • ‘What's more, balance the books properly and you can avoid the perils of going deeper and deeper into debt.’
      • ‘There was a desk in the middle of the room, with account books stacked and arranged neatly around each other.’
      • ‘Account books of the period reveal how traders fared in this unusual situation.’
      • ‘He had then tried to juggle the accounts in a desperate bid to balance the books.’
      • ‘It is believed that the land was not mentioned in the company's books or records or in the annual accounts.’
      • ‘Overnight there was a tenfold increase in the valuation put on the city's council homes to balance the books and keep the sell-off on track.’
      • ‘They need to be able to balance the books to continue to provide it.’
      • ‘With all this extra wealth coming into the city, the council is unable to balance the books.’
      • ‘The council has been struggling to balance the books for years.’
      • ‘To help you balance the books for a night at the movies, here is the admission and snack bar breakdown for the five theatres reviewed.’
      • ‘His proposal has come as council finance chiefs look to balance the books and keep this year's rise in council tax below five per cent.’
      • ‘They must sell an expensive player approximately once every 12 months to balance the books.’
      • ‘For example, she bases one chapter on account books devoted to the West Indian trade.’
      • ‘The money I put in on departure was to balance the books, but reductions in certain areas will be needed.’
      • ‘In this study, memoirs and diaries, account books and statistics are used to forge an image of the life that went on in these houses.’
      • ‘But sceptics say he still has to cut spending or raise taxes to balance the books and could raise indirect taxes in next year's budget.’
      • ‘They balance the books by selling places to students from developing countries.’
      • ‘That's where the savings are required to balance the books.’
      accounts, records, archives
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A bookmaker's record of bets accepted and money paid out.
      • ‘According to both the bookmakers and the form book it's a two-horse race.’
    3. 2.3Soccer The notebook in which a referee writes the names of players who are cautioned for foul play.
      ‘his name went into the book for a foul on Smyth’
      • ‘Newsome's name was soon added to referee's book when he deliberately tripped an opponent.’
      • ‘It was the 11 th of the season for a man who is no stranger to the referee's book.’
    4. 2.4the book The first six tricks taken by the declarer in a hand of bridge, after which further tricks count towards fulfilling the contract.
      • ‘The person who plays the highest card of the suit led, or who plays the highest trump, wins the book.’
      • ‘If no one plays a trump, then the highest ranking card to the suit led wins the book.’
  • 3A set of tickets, stamps, matches, samples of cloth, etc., bound together.

    ‘a pattern book’
    • ‘Current rules allow a passenger to carry two lighters and four books of matches.’
    • ‘Perry specialised in making books of matches (advertising bars or restaurants, for example).’
    • ‘Sample books were purchased for the teachers to read based on their preferences.’
    • ‘Instead, it was as if the models were swathed in giant fabric sample books, each layer peeling off to reveal another beneath.’
    • ‘They have books of pictures and samples that you can look through there, and they can do it all.’
    • ‘Junior season ticket books cost £25 for home and away games plus cup competitions.’
    • ‘Once, when he was driving with his fiancée, a traffic policeman stopped him and took out a ticket book.’
    • ‘At our local wallpaper store they gave me several large sample books of discounted wallpaper.’
    • ‘If you feel you can support the club by selling a few books of tickets please don't hesitate to contact any committee or club member.’
    • ‘All completed ticket books and sponsorship should be returned to the organising committee immediately.’
    • ‘Season ticket holders are being urged to bring their entire season ticket books with them to ensure entry to the ground.’
    • ‘It's just, when you go out into the woods you should carry a book of matches, or some waterproof matches.’
    • ‘He scribbled his address and Com number on the back of a book of matches and gave it to her.’
    • ‘In addition to the student samples, items are also sampled into test books.’
    • ‘Those who can write in with the correct guess win a book of stamps!’
    • ‘He sits again, pulls a book of matches out of his pocket, strikes one and holds it out toward me.’
    • ‘It was then that he remembered the book of matches in his pocket, and drew it out.’
    • ‘What to do when you are suddenly faced with a wall of wallpaper sample books at your local retail store?’
    • ‘A book of first class stamps and a letter of apology was the scant compensation offered to a woman who claimed her mail had been stolen.’
    • ‘Leagues of volunteers will start working the room selling books of Grand Raffle tickets.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Reserve (accommodation, a place, etc.); buy (a ticket) in advance.

    ‘I have booked a table at the Swan’
    no object ‘book early to avoid disappointment’
    • ‘If deemed appropriate, a student union committee could suspend the fraternity's privileges for booking rooms and tables.’
    • ‘During its long run, the Community Centre was booked out in advance for most of the show nights.’
    • ‘The auditorium was packed and places were booked well in advance for this eagerly anticipated show.’
    • ‘Excursions can be booked at the guest services desk at the resort.’
    • ‘Regretfully only those who have booked places can be accommodated on this occasion’
    • ‘A little voice at the back of my head is telling me I really should book some accommodation in advance.’
    • ‘As places are limited it is important that places are booked early.’
    • ‘Similar to one week packages in the Canary Islands, all places were booked well in advance.’
    • ‘Space for bicycles is limited on Scotrail trains, and so book a place in advance.’
    • ‘By the end of the no-pressure sell, the four other guests had booked a consultation.’
    • ‘Whenever I book a ticket in advance, they always put me in the quiet carriage.’
    • ‘Advance tickets can be booked online or by calling 07005 942 579.’
    • ‘Much coastal and Dales accommodation is already booked up in advance, and Scarborough had to print 10,000 extra holiday brochures to satisfy demand.’
    • ‘From November to March its rooms are booked up more quickly than umbrellas turn inside out.’
    • ‘Places are fully booked for the Summer Camp.’
    • ‘The popularity of the event has meant commercial accommodations are sometimes booked one year in advance.’
    • ‘The hotels and guest houses are booked up a year in advance, and anyone who has any sense will spend both days avoiding the main roads and the railway station.’
    • ‘You can support them by booking your tickets or table at the earliest convenience and ensure you're attending a very special Dream Ball.’
    • ‘The tower - including the viewing platform - can be booked for special events.’
    • ‘All welcome to come and view the activities and premises on offer or to book a place for your child.’
    reserve, make a reservation for, arrange in advance, prearrange, arrange for, order
    arrange, programme, schedule, timetable, line up, secure, fix up, lay on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Reserve accommodation for (someone)
      ‘his secretary had booked him into the Howard Hotel’
      with two objects ‘book me a single room at my usual hotel’
      • ‘Even booking you both into one of the most luxurious hotels in Moncton, Canada.’
      • ‘Until we realised we had been booked into the wrong hotel.’
      • ‘My boyfriend brought me to London and surprised me by booking us in at the Met Hotel, absolutely stunning and funky place to stay, I loved it!’
      • ‘They sought out a guest services representative and booked themselves into a 5 star resort, just a 20 minute drive away.’
      • ‘It started out with me being booked to work for NWA Florida through Eric Loy who is a liaison for the promotion.’
      • ‘We'd been booked into The Hotel That Time Forgot.’
      • ‘Around 1,000 guests were flown in on planes chartered from Air India and were booked into two swish hotels.’
      • ‘The hotel they'd booked me was expensive, but I wasn't complaining.’
      • ‘We have taken the liberty at booking you at Collelungo, an agriturismo near Castellina.’
      • ‘A couple feared for their lives after they were booked into a hotel in what they described as a dangerous drugs ghetto in South Africa.’
    2. 1.2book in/intono object Register one's arrival at a hotel.
      ‘he booked in at a hotel’
      • ‘Being pampered, of course, is one of the main reasons why people book into luxury hotels, and it would be churlish to resent it.’
      • ‘It's not what you expect when you book into a nice hotel.’
      • ‘Humphry and I arrived late that night and booked into the City Hotel.’
      • ‘On arrival we booked into the hotel and then the festivities began with our annual pre-dive get-together.’
      • ‘If you were alone and the weather was really bad you could always book into a hotel.’
      • ‘A snowstorm dominated the news and led to hundreds of people taking time off work or booking into hotels rather than donning their boots to stride through the slush.’
      • ‘I've booked into hotel rooms under so many assumed names that I couldn't remember how to sign the bill.’
      • ‘He said that he would book into a hotel that suited him.’
      • ‘Imagine booking into this hotel, with its romantic associations, and being faced with this brute of a building’
      • ‘They booked into the hotel but guests had complained about the couple rowing in their room, the hotel's restaurant and its gardens.’
      • ‘We booked into our fleapit hotels and checked out, we got on our buses and got off them again, we signed up on lists and then found that a new list was being drawn up which we were not on.’
      • ‘He was feeling quite mellow after the usual hassle of the journey and booking into the hotel.’
      • ‘They had booked into hotels near to the union's Clapham Junction head office a week before.’
      • ‘By December 4, he had booked into the Plaza Hotel in Honolulu.’
      • ‘She explained she was booked into the hotel because of its four star status.’
      • ‘So next time you fly away for business or pleasure consider the advantages of renting a serviced apartment rather than booking into a hotel.’
      • ‘And rather than face the long walk home, some had chosen to book into hotels in the city centre.’
      • ‘People travel from far and near and are even booking into local hotels.’
      • ‘We booked into the hotel in the next village - an institution that prided itself on its local cuisine.’
      • ‘The girl's parents called police on August 26 when they discovered she had booked into the Leamington hotel after telling them she was going to stay with a friend.’
      register, check in, enrol, log one's arrival, record one's arrival
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Engage (a performer or guest) for an event.
      ‘the promoter booked him for another appearance’
      • ‘A promoter who booked them to play in Ripley, Derbyshire, suggested he change his name to Cliff Richard.’
      • ‘He has been booked to perform three times this season by Reading, Yeovil and Swindon.’
      • ‘According to the panel report, he was responsible for booking Western artists for the Harbour Fest.’
      • ‘Even if they've never heard you speak, the fact that you were booked as a speaker gives you instant credibility.’
      • ‘Several senior speakers from Scotland's main IT markets are booked for the networking event.’
      • ‘Work got underway booking performers as far back as last September and work on the parade for concepts and ideas got underway in March.’
      • ‘So I was surprised when I heard where we had been booked to perform this Patrick's Day - Niagara, the Canadian side.’
      • ‘Each month the society holds a concert booking artists from all over the UK and abroad.’
      • ‘The singer was originally booked for a small concert in Hangzhou on June 12, sponsored by an ice tea company.’
      • ‘But Thomas does not stop at booking the artists.’
      • ‘However the programme for this year is going to be hard to improve on as some of the best artistes in Ireland and abroad are booked to perform.’
      • ‘Many acts have been booked to perform both on the main stage in Castlewellan and in several smaller venues in Newcastle, Ballynahinch and Downpatrick.’
      • ‘He booked me on a show in Alabama, but didn't know who the audience was.’
      • ‘We've booked a band for the night and some other guest artists will also play.’
      • ‘He is booked perform one of his routines live on national television.’
      • ‘No, but they can determine whether or not someone should take a risk on booking an artist.’
    4. 1.4be booked up Have all places reserved; be full.
      ‘at weekends we're usually booked up’
      • ‘People can come on the night but it may be booked up so they should book in advance.’
      • ‘Every place we'd tried was booked up, so we were getting a bit panicky.’
      • ‘All my rooms were booked up by congress delegates.’
      • ‘All places have been booked up this weekend, but the sessions will also be available next Saturday.’
      • ‘And because the doctors' time is being booked up by patients who don't turn up, it means everyone has to wait longer to see their GP.’
      • ‘The Evening Press made a call to the centre to ask what accommodation was available and was told by that most hotels were booked up this weekend.’
      • ‘Any builder of any worth is booked up from now till kingdom come, and they don't do too badly on the money front either.’
      • ‘But yet again the photographer was turned away because the gallery was booked up.’
      • ‘Since then, it has become a popular venue for exhibitions and is booked up until well into 2006.’
      • ‘‘My clinic is booked up until 2006, with a waiting list of nine to ten months, and my colleagues also have waiting lists of up to 12 months,’ he said.’
  • 2Make an official note of the personal details of (a person who has broken a law or rule)

    ‘the cop booked me and took me down to the station’
    • ‘The 39-year-old singer was booked on a felony charge of assault with a deadly weapon late on Friday.’
    • ‘He was arrested in a San Francisco residence and brought to the San Jose Main Jail where he was booked on several counts of armed robbery.’
    • ‘A number of people were booked quite unnecessarily, causing anger and disbelief that such an innocent action could result in such draconian measures.’
    • ‘He was transported back to Bayview Station where he was booked on weapons, narcotics, the warrant and illegal encampment charges.’
    • ‘Clients who do stop in these areas are often harassed by police by flashing their lights or booking them for traffic offences.’
    • ‘Eventually you'll get booked by the cops and handed a fine.’
    • ‘He was also booked for selling alcohol after hours.’
    • ‘He was booked on suspicion of making threats with intent to terrorize and on suspicion of interfering with a person's civil rights.’
    • ‘After a sobriety test, he was booked on suspicion of two misdemeanor charges’
    • ‘After new inmates are booked, they're interviewed, sometimes for as long as 45 minutes.’
    • ‘We went over to the Palm Beach County Jail where I was booked on this single charge, filed a not guilty plea, went in there and smiled for the mug shot.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, officers booked him on charges of theft.’
    • ‘She was booked on a misdemeanor shoplifting charge and released on $600 bail.’
    • ‘Officers took the inebriated tourists to the Pattaya police station and booked them on charges of physical assault and drunk and disorderly behavior.’
    • ‘She was booked on misdemeanor counts of hit-and-run and driving without a valid driver license.’
    1. 2.1Soccer (of a referee) note down the name of (a player) who is cautioned for foul play.
      ‘McMahon was booked for a foul’
      • ‘The referee books him for a poorly concealed piece of play-acting.’
      • ‘That is important now, because referees are liable to book players for trivial things.’
      • ‘Once a player's been booked there is always a possibility that if he does anything else he will get sent off.’
      • ‘If players haven't been booked or sent off, or there aren't shenanigans in a game, then it's considered a boring match.’
      • ‘He says players over here are booked for minor offences by referees who operate by the letter of the law and claimed the same offences would go unpunished in all other major European leagues.’
  • 3US informal no object Leave suddenly.

    ‘they just ate your pizza and drank your soda and booked’
    • ‘Look, I gotta book. I'll see you guys later.’
    • ‘You gotta book, Officer. I gotta stay.’
    • ‘It was time to book out of here. I jumped onto the bike and started to pedal, heading for the mainland.’
    • ‘We gotta book—fast.’
    1. 3.1 Move quickly; hurry.
      ‘my sister and I booked to the playground’
      ‘I didn't hear the verdict because I had to book it to work’
      • ‘He's booking through that park.’
      • ‘She waved bye-bye and booked out of there.’
      • ‘Then he just booked it around the corner and we never saw him again.’
      • ‘We better book if we're gonna go to P.E.’
      • ‘I started booking it due north, trying my best to move as quickly as I could without losing my footing.’
      • ‘Book, man! Can't you run? Something wrong with your legs?’
      • ‘He was booking through a parking lot recently when a car lurched backward.’

Phrases

  • bring someone to book

    • Officially punish someone or call them to account for their behaviour.

      ‘the murderer will be found and brought to book’
      • ‘It's good that he has been brought to book and sends out a strong message to others.’
      • ‘Officers want teachers to join them on night-time patrol so they can identify juvenile troublemakers and help bring them to book.’
      • ‘And he warned the troublemakers that they would be brought to book over the next few months using evidence gathered on the night and CCTV video footage of the disorder.’
      • ‘The council should be bringing someone to book.’
      • ‘And officers have warned the criminals that they have taken an extra special interest in bringing them to book.’
      • ‘If you are found guilty of corruption, you will be brought to book.’
      • ‘He seemed unfazed that an array of high-tech gadgetry was to be deployed in his street with the aim of bringing him to book.’
      • ‘He said: ‘They are committing environmental crimes and our dedicated enforcement teams will be using all their investigative resources to track them down and bring them to book.’’
      • ‘But they can be brought to book under legislation governing companies making false and misleading claims.’
      • ‘When we find them, we'll bring them to book and lock them away for a long, long time.’
      scold, upbraid, berate, reprimand, reprove, rebuke, admonish, chide, censure, castigate, lambaste, lecture, criticize, pull up, take to task, haul over the coals, bring to book
      View synonyms
  • by the book

    • Strictly according to the rules.

      ‘a cop who doesn't exactly play it by the book’
      • ‘For such policemen, I have no feelings, they ought to be dealt with strictly by the book.’
      • ‘Do you think the TV stations are playing by the book in not running excessively violent stuff at 8.30?’
      • ‘Now, this might appear to be a time to play things strictly by the book in order to protect your biggest lifetime investment.’
      • ‘No, I am just trying to do the whole thing by the book according to my right as a qualified resident foreigner.’
      • ‘It's not because all of these corporations are doing it just by the book.’
      • ‘But hey, life's too short to play it by the book all the time.’
      • ‘They follow procedure and go by the book; he ignores the rules if it means getting the job done.’
      • ‘We even have to keep an open mind about whether there were any dealings that weren't strictly by the book.’
      • ‘The referee played it by the book and said that League rules say that if the pitch isn't fit at 12 noon it won't get any better.’
      • ‘Business as usual, even when done strictly by the book, is not necessarily the safest way of operating.’
      according to the rules, in accordance with the rules, within the law, abiding by the law, lawfully, legally, legitimately, licitly
      View synonyms
  • close the books

    • Make no further entries at the end of an accounting period; cease trading.

      ‘branches will be asked to close their books at the end of December’
      • ‘In fact, Vermont closed the books on its 2003 fiscal year with a $10.4 million surplus, even as California, Massachusetts, and many other states battle huge deficits.’
      • ‘I'll eat my hat if his successor does not close the books at the end of 2004 with a small surplus.’
      • ‘It adds that that the aim is ‘to clear the accounts and to close the books for the years up to March 1995’.’
      • ‘The Dow and Nasdaq were ready to close the books on their first down years since 1990.’
      • ‘Shareholder requirements for dividends made it necessary to define an accounting period, close the books and calculate profits.’
      • ‘Now, as companies close the books on another quarter, the lack of pricing power combined with weak demand is sapping the top and bottom lines.’
      • ‘This focus is consistent with the practice of closing the books of account annually.’
      • ‘He suggests that a club owner spend the extra money to hire an accountant to formally close the books at the end of the year.’
      • ‘One can also appreciate how the bean counters want to be able to close the books with a positive result against any negative expense.’
      • ‘We're still closing the books on 2003, and there will be a summary article in the April issue of the magazine.’
  • in someone's bad (or good) books

    • In disfavour (or favour) with someone.

      ‘you could say he is in my bad books’
      • ‘The matron, who was in charge of us, was a formidable figure and you didn't want to get in her bad books.’
      • ‘Ministers and officials in the state see to it that they stay in their good books.’
      • ‘She's a terrible snob and I'm sure she's only inviting you because it's the done thing and she wants to be polite as well as keep in my good books.’
      • ‘They say: ‘Let's try and be in their good books.’’
      • ‘And since she answered my silly questions with patience and saccharine sweetness, she is in my good books.’
      • ‘He's back in their good books, so his odds remain long.’
      • ‘Apparently all the folk in Deerness had heard of my good deed, and that seems to have put me in their good books.’
      • ‘After half-an-hour of this taunting and torture, the only place his men would have been was in his bad books.’
      • ‘I still didn't think it would be a good idea to go by there alone - especially since I was now in his bad books.’
      • ‘Jon defended me gallantly, earning him a little tick in my good books.’
      in favour, popular, friendly, friends
      View synonyms
  • in my book

    • In my opinion.

      ‘that counts as a lie in my book’
      • ‘It was a fish soup, no doubt made from yesterday's unsold fish - but that's a good thing in my book.’
      • ‘They all had vests but not one of them had opted for a tie, another transgression in my book.’
      • ‘So in my book that makes it really controllable, even in bad weather.’
      • ‘True democracy, in my book, is one person one vote on any decision that effects the society that is voting.’
      • ‘Admittedly he is inclined to forget things like birthdays, but that's not a cardinal sin, not in my book, anyway.’
      • ‘Forgive the caveman economics, but keeping the lights and heating on comes a long way ahead of saving the planet, in my book.’
      • ‘At the press of a button, I could tell what temperature it was in their nursery too, which takes spying to a whole new level in my book.’
      • ‘Celebrities who can rough it on the streets with the homeless are okay in my book.’
      • ‘The party was a real laugh, lovely people, tasty food - a good combo in my book!’
      • ‘So anything which helps interns find their way around a community which can be very intimidating must, in my book, be a good thing.’
      for my part, for my own part, for myself, according to my way of thinking, to my mind, in my estimation, as far as i am concerned, in my opinion, in my view, in my own opinion, in my own view, from my own point of view, from where i stand, from my standpoint, as i see it, if you ask me, for my money, in my book
      View synonyms
  • make (or open) a book

    • Take bets and pay out winnings on the outcome of a race or other contest or event.

      ‘the bookies opened a book on his successor’
      • ‘In fact Betfair has nothing in particular to do with racing or any other sport on which it makes a book.’
      • ‘Major organizations are making book on who will be the next Miss World; check out this site for the current odds, and place a bet if you are so inclined.’
      • ‘IG Index and its spread betting competitors garner publicity by making a book on ‘grey market’ prices ahead of initial public offerings (IPOs).’
      • ‘Meanwhile, a quintessentially Wodehousian plot is brewing in nearby Tottleigh Castle, where staff is making book on the identity of Lady's Alyce's husband-to-be.’
      • ‘It will probably do worse - since the kind of events he wants to make book on are even more unpredictable and emotional than elections.’
      • ‘If I knew how to open a book (the bookie kind, I know how to open book-books) I would.’
      • ‘You can think of it as an American alternative to those famous London betting shops that will make book on just about anything.’
      • ‘The company is always game to open a book on most events and we do get some unusual requests.’
      • ‘The bookmakers have opened a book on the Anti-Litter League quoting Kilkenny city as favourite to win at odds of 10/1.’
  • on the books

    • Contained in a list of members, employees, or clients.

      ‘the club have six top foreign players on their books’
      • ‘The garage closes with 15 employees on the books, all of whom are entitled to transfer to the incoming dealer in Preston.’
      • ‘He was one of the 50,000 or so people on the books of YouGov, the internet pollsters, but was hardly ever asked for his views.’
      • ‘The ailing team have finally resigned from division two with only seven or eight players on the books.’
      • ‘He was on the books of top rugby union club Leicester Tigers as a junior but has switched to the League code.’
      • ‘Said player would be placed on the books, which would then be made available for clubs anxious to strengthen their squads.’
      • ‘The first three players on the books have the talent to form the nucleus of a premiership winning side.’
      • ‘He's not the fastest player on the books and occasionally he can be a bit casual and sometimes gets caught in possession.’
      • ‘We have only got thirteen players on the books who have made more than 20 Premiership appearances.’
      • ‘This includes several dozen refugees from the former Yugoslavia who are on the books of an employment agency.’
      • ‘Discloses for the first time that six current members of the United first team squad are now on the books of the modelling agency.’
  • People of the Book

    • Jews and Christians as regarded by Muslims.

      • ‘The Jews became known as the People of the Book, a title given them by Mohammed.’
      • ‘Then the people of the Qu'ran join with the People of the Book, admiring their common prophets.’
      • ‘The People of the Book will say a prayer, thanking God / Yahweh / Allah for the food.’
      • ‘It is often said by Muslims that there is respect in traditional Islam for the People of the Book - that is, Jews and Christians.’
      • ‘We cannot marry in any circumstances among the followers of other religious barring the People of the Book.’
      • ‘Instead, there is a far greater possibility that such marriages will positively influence the women of the People of the Book by inducing them to accept Islam.’
      • ‘Some modern thinkers call for recognition of the ties binding the People of the Book together as a means of promoting interfaith dialogue and cooperation.’
      • ‘Muslim men are permitted to marry non-Muslim women from the People of the Book - i.e. Jews and Christians.’
      • ‘Do the People of the Book in the verse refer to the Jews and Christians of all times?’
      • ‘The ultimate challenges of the People of the Book have never been physical ones.’
  • suit someone's book

    • Be convenient for someone.

      ‘it didn't suit her book at all to be moved’
      • ‘Of course many of us have to relearn these lessons in a new cycle because changes in monetary policy seldom suit our book at the time.’
      • ‘Decide what type of work activities best suit your book.’
      • ‘Price your liquidity accurately for each of your client segments and recognize which flows suit your book and which don't, so that you can.’
      • ‘It is typical of the minimisation the Leader of the Opposition is capable of when it suits his book.’
      • ‘It might suit his book to allege that, but that is not the position of my honourable friend.’
      • ‘Sorry if that doesn't suit your book or your plans for us but when you said for us to go home you forgot one thing.’
      • ‘My sister is quick to call somebody a friend, even somebody she hardly knows, if it suits her book.’
  • take a leaf out of someone's book

    • Imitate or emulate someone in a particular way.

      ‘worm-watchers should take a leaf out of Darwin's fieldcraft book and sit still to observe the action’
      • ‘I'm going to take a leaf out of your book, at least for a couple of days, and spend my time eating and sleeping by turns.’
      • ‘We may all stand disgusted when we see the state of some foreign prisons, but maybe we should take a leaf out of their book.’
      • ‘He carried the club at times last season, but others must take a leaf out of his book.’
      • ‘If only those responsible for devising the new routes and timetables for our buses could take a leaf out of their book.’
      • ‘You have some genuine elected members who care for their community so perhaps take a leaf out of their book.’
      • ‘I hope you do not mind Catherine, I am taking a leaf out of your book and asking anyone that passes this way to please call around and offer your support to John and his family.’
      • ‘He wished more young people would take a leaf out of his book and follow his example.’
      • ‘Perhaps those intent on putting up ludicrously-priced properties under the guise of ‘regeneration’ around here could take a leaf out of their book.’
      • ‘I hope others take a leaf out of your book and I look forward to working with you again next year.’
      • ‘He seems very pleasant and hard working, a few could do with taking a leaf out of his book.’
      • ‘They gave an as near to perfect display of football as possible and what a pity some of our male teams don't take a leaf out of their book.’
      imitate, copy, reproduce, mimic, mirror, echo, follow, model oneself on, take as a model, take as an example
      View synonyms
  • throw the book at

    • informal Charge or punish (someone) as severely as possible.

      ‘get this lot down to the station and throw the book at them’
      • ‘I hope the NYC police throw the book at this woman.’
      • ‘I hope that the prosecutors and law enforcement officers also take this seriously and throw the book at him if he is caught.’
      • ‘We have always said we're prepared to throw the book at the terrorists, because that's who we've got to concentrate upon.’
      • ‘If the charges are proved, throw the book at the perpetrators, but not until.’
      • ‘But this is their opportunity to appear tough on racial sensitivity and they're going to throw the book at us.’
      • ‘As far as we are concerned, we will throw the book at them and we would expect that magistrates do the same.’
      • ‘Speeders beware: judge may throw the book at you’
      • ‘If so, then I do hope that the feds are throwing the book at her - I want her to fry for this!’
      • ‘And considering my contempt for the Ivy League, I hope, you know, they throw the book at them.’
      • ‘You can't throw the book at anyone because it is happening.’
      • ‘But if he doesn't, I'm sure the government is prepared to throw the book at him.’
      • ‘Will you, Mr Speaker, sort out the chief whip and throw the book at her?’
      • ‘If he's guilty, they should throw the book at him.’
      • ‘Does this make you feel like throwing the book at your unsolicited informant, and to lose interest in reading on?’
      • ‘The United States sees children killing each other in the classroom, but you can't just throw the book at them.’
      • ‘We're going to throw the book at you, or at least some facts, from our presidential election research editorial guide.’
      • ‘And last week, in the run-up to his visit, the Kremlin was continuing to throw the book at the company.’
      • ‘So they're basically saying to people, ‘If we ever find out that the claims that you made were false, look out, we're going to throw the book at you.’’
      • ‘Her bond has been set at $50,000 and it would be nice if a judge throws the book at her.’
      • ‘I suppose its best that I ask the Corporation to take away my bin and throw the book at me as you cannot get blood out of a stone - and I am that stone.’
      scold, upbraid, berate, reprimand, reprove, rebuke, admonish, chide, censure, castigate, lambaste, lecture, criticize, pull up, take to task, haul over the coals, bring to book
      View synonyms
  • write the book

    • Used in reference to particular expertise or proficiency in a subject, area of activity, etc.

      ‘they actually care about the product they are making and they wrote the book on customer service’
      ‘he pretty much writes the book on how to be perfect in the media’
      • ‘I could write the book on rehab.’
      • ‘Here were two football powers who wrote the book on heroics and football legends, rewriting it in a game and on a stage like this.’
      • ‘California wrote the book on approachability.’
      • ‘He's the man who wrote the book on duplicity.’
      • ‘Clooney plays Miles Massey, a hotshot divorce attorney who wrote the book on prenuptial agreements.’
      • ‘I know how the whole ‘need-to-know’ system works: in fact I wrote the book on it!’
      • ‘The only thing Robert is willing to reveal about the special guest mentor is that they could "write the book on vulnerability."’
      • ‘They could write the book on luxury, whether it's stays in country houses on the shores of magical lochs or voyages through the Outer Hebrides.’
      • ‘The way she goes on, you'd think she wrote the book on fidelity.’
  • you can't judge a book by its cover

    • proverb Outward appearances are not a reliable indication of the true character of someone or something.

      • ‘And I think that, like this movie says, you can't judge a book by its cover.’
      • ‘This was just another thing that contributed to the fact you can't judge a book by its cover.’
      • ‘This book defies the old adage that claims you can't judge a book by its cover.’
      • ‘They seemed all right at first but I suppose you can't judge a book by its cover.’
      • ‘I told you that you can't judge a book by its cover,’ he reminded her, in an ‘I-told-you-so’ type of manner.’
      • ‘Despite the admonition that you can't judge a book by its cover, I tend to find that, increasingly, you can.’
      • ‘But you can't judge a book by its cover or whatever they say.’
      • ‘Guess you can't judge a book by its cover after all.’
      • ‘Mind you, you can't judge a book by its cover, me old mum used to say.’
      • ‘Anyone who says you can't judge a book by its cover is an idiot.’

Origin

Old English bōc (originally also ‘a document or charter’), bōcian ‘to grant by charter’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch boek and German Buch, and probably to beech (on which runes were carved).

Pronunciation

book

/bʊk/