Definition of bone idle in English:

bone idle

(also bone lazy)

adjective

British
  • Extremely idle or lazy.

    • ‘René Descartes has always been one of the more appealing philosophers, not least because he was so human, quarrelsome and frequently bone idle.’
    • ‘It seems that people are too bone idle to take unwanted items to the refuse collection points, so they just leave them in the back streets.’
    • ‘The third family consists of Veronica, her intensely irritating husband and her two apparently bone idle sons.’
    • ‘The truth is as a country we are bone idle couch potatoes who make no effort to change our lifestyles.’
    • ‘Instead, I'm going to finish my book, then do the college work I didn't do yesterday because I'm too bone idle.’
    • ‘He is complaining that Andrew is bone idle and hasn't worked hard enough at his tasks, and that nobody else has picked him up on his faults.’
    • ‘We hear too much about ‘hard-working families’ and not enough about bone idle ones.’
    • ‘The visitor complied, then turned to the lazy angler and said: ‘You know, anyone as bone idle as you ought to get married and have a son to do these things for you.’’
    • ‘I'm bone idle and far too self involved to join in anything online - unless I'm really bored and have nothing to write about.’
    • ‘McDowell is intellectually superior, and he will steer through anything he wants, and our lads are bone lazy.’
    • ‘In fact, he's a lazy, petulant, dead-eyed, over-sensitive, bone idle git.’
    • ‘Basically we're bone idle and a 42-date tour doesn't appeal to us any more, so traditionally we've just played Manchester or Liverpool.’

Origin

Early 19th century: expressing idle through to the bone.

Pronunciation

bone idle