Definition of Bombay Hills in English:

Bombay Hills

proper noun

  • A group of hills marking the southern boundary of greater Auckland.

Phrases

  • north of the Bombay Hills

    • informal Auckland, as distinct from the rest of New Zealand.

      ‘those who live north of the Bombay Hills should visit the region’
      • ‘Auckland is pulling more and more New Zealanders north of the Bombay Hills.’
      • ‘Investors north of the Bombay Hills will have to cough up a 30 per cent deposit on homes.’
      • ‘Any members, particularly those who live north of the Bombay Hills, who have not visited the region should do so.’
      • ‘Just how many people north of the Bombay Hills had their credit cards out this morning scraping ice from the car windows?’
      • ‘It is a lot cheaper than could be bought just a few kilometres north of the Bombay hills.’
  • south of the Bombay Hills

    • informal The rest of New Zealand beyond Auckland.

      ‘skyrocketing house prices mean Aucklanders' can no longer ignore happenings south of the Bombay Hills’
      • ‘Now taxpayers from those areas south of the Bombay Hills have been conscripted to help out.’
      • ‘We sold a family property south of the Bombay Hills two years ago.’
      • ‘He was looking for some more talent south of the Bombay Hills.’
      • ‘I suggest to the honourable member that she look just south of the Bombay Hills to see the problems we are having.’
      • ‘Down here south of the Bombay Hills, while we don't like losing our power or ADSL connections, we know that it's just one of those Bad Things that happens.’
      • ‘We know that journalists these days struggle with attention to detail, especially for anything south of the Bombay Hills.’
      • ‘Those who never venture south of the Bombay Hills will wonder what all the fuss is about.’
      • ‘I tell her I'm from Wellington and so I know there's a land mass south of the Bombay Hills.’
      • ‘As someone who comes from south of the Bombay Hills, I have looked upon the Auckland War Memorial Museum as an icon of New Zealand, not just of Auckland.’