Definition of bobsleigh in English:

bobsleigh

noun

British
  • A mechanically steered and braked sledge, typically for two or four people, used for racing down an ice-covered run.

    • ‘The trains are pulled by a fleet of electric trolleys, which look like the bastard offspring of a bobsleigh and a golf buggy.’
    • ‘Equally distinctive are Lartigue's photos of people zooming around in the latest high-powered vehicles - bobsleighs, go-karts, racing cars, rickety airplanes.’
    • ‘He was just one of a line up of unpredictable winners, including Britain's Shelley Rudman, who gained a silver medal in the skeleton bobsleigh.’
    • ‘The bobsleigh is no lightweight piece of equipment.’
    • ‘There were about 300 people at this gathering in Boston, and you could have put the straight ones in a four-man bobsleigh and still have found room for a washing machine.’
    • ‘If you're a fan of Santa, speed, bobsleighs or really annoying banjo music, Speedy Santa is the game for you.’
    • ‘The Wiltshire Times launched a hunt two weeks ago for video footage of Audley Richards competing in the bobsleigh event in the winter Olympics.’
    • ‘A knee injury forced him off the athletics track but he turned his hand to other sports and represented Great Britain in the Olympic bobsleigh team in 1988.’
    • ‘The Winter Olympics feature events such as the skeleton, the bobsleigh and snowboarding, as well as traditional winter sports such as ice skating, skiing and curling.’
    • ‘The snowy stages are lined by thick snowbanks, which drivers use to negotiate corners a bit like bobsleighs!’
    • ‘He invited her to have a go at bobsleigh but she could not get a place on a course - the only vacancy was on a skeleton course.’
    • ‘Asked what they had been up to in their alpine retreat, the Teplice coach laughed: ‘Mainly skis, sledges and bobsleighs.’’
    • ‘At the Lillehammer school, Siobhán was the first Irishwoman to drive a bobsleigh and recalls it as a harrowing experience, to say the least!’
    • ‘The prodigiously capable Louise, for instance, is weighing the relative claims upon her imagination of long jumping and bobsleigh.’
    • ‘Rudman's name joins a distinguished list of British eccentrics headed by Tony Nash and Robin Dixon, whose legend persists 42 years after their gold in the bobsleigh at the 1964 Games in Innsbruck.’
    • ‘We were supposed to do a two-man bobsleigh, but I didn't like the look of it.’
    • ‘All we need now is some snow and a few bobsleigh runs and there will be no stopping us.’
    • ‘His athletic career goal was to make the Olympics, whether in track and field, bobsleigh or any other sport.’
    • ‘A few weeks earlier, the decision had been taken to site Utah Olympic Park on this mountain, and use it to stage the bobsleigh and luge run and ski jumping venues there.’
    • ‘We were at the Olympic bobsleigh run at the village of Le Roche, just below the ski resort of La Plagne in the French Alps.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (originally US, denoting a sleigh made of two short sleighs coupled together and used for hauling logs): from bob in the sense ‘short’+ sleigh.

Pronunciation:

bobsleigh

/ˈbɒbsleɪ/