Definition of boat in English:

boat

noun

  • 1A small vessel for travelling over water, propelled by oars, sails, or an engine:

    ‘a fishing boat’
    [as modifier] ‘a boat trip’
    • ‘Sure, every solo sailor has this terrible image of them falling off the boat and watching the boat sail away perfectly trimmed up, under auto pilot.’
    • ‘We were a tight-knit group of three once the boat had set sail, and we were in a large dining area.’
    • ‘Fu told Baja, as well as reporters, that the fishermen strayed into Philippine waters after their boat engine malfunctioned.’
    • ‘It's interesting that both films start with McCrea on a boat, sailing into unknown waters.’
    • ‘The propeller from the boat's engine was embedded 6 inches into a fence post.’
    • ‘Stromness lifeboat was called out on Sunday evening after a fishing boat with engine trouble began drifting towards shore near the Bay of Skaill.’
    • ‘He and many others landed jobs on in-shore mackerel boats, fishing tamer waters around the isle.’
    • ‘While the boat was sailing towards the land, everyone on the shore became active.’
    • ‘If you are an expert sailor or you can't tell a reef knot from a mainbrace, just turn up and you can be sure of being welcomed on one of the club boats for a sail.’
    • ‘However Albert said that sailing on the Asgard was a completely different experience to sailing on smaller boats and yachts.’
    • ‘About an hour into the trip, the boat's engine hit a rock and lost power; the craft was battered by waves and soon capsized.’
    • ‘Nearby, fisherman Rolando Ramirez helped others pull their fishing boats from the water.’
    • ‘This in turn causes surrounding air to rush into the sail and propel the boat further.’
    • ‘It was a short wait and it wasn't long until the three of them were piled into a small boat and sent sailing off into the water.’
    • ‘At age 72, Pam sails her own boat and each year takes a wicked sailing trip to the Caribbean with friends.’
    • ‘Sometimes the Coliseum was transformed into a desert or into a jungle, and it could also be filled with water and turned into a lake so boats could sail in it.’
    • ‘Yes, we can all sail our boats along the surface of the water, so long as we obey federal regulations regarding navigation.’
    • ‘Working feverishly, the crew and shore team refitted the boat and sailed it to La Rochelle in time to rejoin the race in leg eight.’
    • ‘She shifted her gaze to where he motioned for her to look and saw boats with white sails skimming lazily across the still orange-tinted waters.’
    • ‘Dogs and cows luxuriate in the sudden coolness; paper boats sail to unknown destinations on swift flowing drain water.’
    vessel, craft, watercraft, ship
    keel, barque
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A vessel of any size, especially a large one:
      ‘those newly arriving here by boat or plane’
      • ‘A boat arrives in a port in this country and it has on board cannabis resin.’
      • ‘The island is particularly well known for its whaling boats, pointed at both ends (most Caribbean boats have squared keels) and up to about thirty feet long.’
      • ‘One of them directed the new arrivals to a berth exactly the right size for their boat.’
      • ‘Their fears that people might be on board were heightened when they arrived and found the boat's diesel outboard motor was running.’
      • ‘Throw a tour party on a boat or a plane every four years or so, and the talk flows instead of ebbs.’
      • ‘Whether you arrive in a boat, a plane, or a cruise ship, you owe it to yourself to take a tour.’
      • ‘The patrol boat's galley is of course about the size of a small suburban bathroom, and full of machinery, ovens, ranges and so on.’
      • ‘Probably a better course of action for arriving boats is to make for the next major island, Maui.’
      • ‘Fachri said it was not recommended for fishing boats, ferries or other big boats to sail in the affected areas.’
      • ‘Normally the observations are made from boats, planes or helicopters, but this is a slow process, and many reefs are not easily accessible.’
      • ‘The fleet consisted of one large fish carrier, a medium purse-seine fishing vessel, three medium sized boats and four ocean going outriggers.’
      • ‘It is my opinion that the Caribbean will have a banner year this year with more boats of all sizes.’
      • ‘Rame Coastwatch, which records the number of boats in the area of the reef, says 300 boats were over the wreck in May and 230 in April.’
      • ‘For several months Coast Guard planes and boats were the only rescue agents available for the region.’
      • ‘How many would actually wear a life jacket if it were required at all times on all sizes of boats is a big unknown.’
      • ‘It was used along with several crash boats to salvage wrecked planes.’
      • ‘The two submarines are not dissimilar in size, with the British boats being slightly larger than her French twin.’
      • ‘They really did sail in those open boats, sometimes travelling for days over open water, with twenty or thirty or even as many as sixty men aboard.’
      • ‘The head is larger than most I have seen on boats of this size and the shower is integral.’
      • ‘Some of the boats keel over and sink, spilling pilgrims and fuel into the harbour.’
  • 2A serving dish in the shape of a boat:

    ‘a gravy boat’
    • ‘Graceful gravy boats in two sizes serve the whole crowd or provide individual service of gravy, cheese sauce, hot fudge and more.’
    • ‘This week everyone gets a free Gravy Boat and after a few shipping problems everyone ends up with a dozen gravy boats after weeks of promises by the manager to set things straight.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Travel in a boat for pleasure:

    ‘they boated through fjords’
    • ‘However, when we boaters don't take steps to mend relationships with the rest of the shorefront community, we often find ourselves fighting for the right to go boating.’
    • ‘I told her to go boating with me and she didn't like the idea at all.’
    • ‘It has vast potential for commerce with boating, cycling, walkers and pleasure cruising.’
    • ‘Water-skiing, windsurfing, kayaking, sail boating and snorkeling are complimentary on the entire Windstar line.’
    • ‘Youngsters hike, climb a rock wall, swim, fish, go boating and bike along the wooded trails.’
    • ‘She also could no longer ride her horse or go boating or camping (which she had previously loved to do).’
    • ‘He also was heavily involved in a range of activities, including swimming, sailing, boating and surf lifesaving.’
    • ‘My children sit in large basins to go boating in the little pond,’ she said laughing.’
    • ‘Even with all of the state's opportunities to go boating, it wouldn't hurt to have a few more.’
    • ‘The couple spend their time skiing, golfing, boating, traveling and socializing with their friends.’
    • ‘Many Baby Boomers just didn't have the time to go boating or put up with the hassles.’
    • ‘I try to go to Vitosha Mountain and I try to go boating in the lake, I try to be with my family, but it is hard.’
    • ‘Our family suddenly decided that we should go boating.’
    • ‘Some 69 million Americans go boating at least once a year.’
    • ‘There is a pretty sprawling lake where you can hike and go boating out in the country a bit.’
    • ‘In the winter of 1999, Calambokidis and his associates boated through this region and photographed 13 blue whales.’
    • ‘And when he and his wife, Toni, go boating with friends, Andreas sticks to his dress code.’
    • ‘You should always use a little risk management when you go boating.’
    • ‘People walk around the Potala Palace, go boating on the lake, and then pitch tents to rest.’
    • ‘This was the first time I'd ever actually been invited to go boating with them.’
    sail, yacht, go sailing, cruise, travel by boat
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object and adverbial of direction] Transport (someone or something) in a boat:
      ‘they boated the timber down the lake’
      • ‘They're finding ways to boat them out of the school through boats up onto the bridge but much of the city of course is still under very high levels of water.’
      • ‘So many estate agents have boated me around Venice, for instance, that I reckon I now know the Serenissima's darkest alleys better than the little red dwarf in Don't Look Now.’
    2. 1.2[with object] (of an angler) draw (a hooked fish) into a boat:
      ‘he boated a 2 lb 14oz Dover sole’
      • ‘Ravensthorpe regular John Caldwell and his boat partner Digby Lewis enjoyed an exciting session boating 20 fish between them.’
      • ‘I have ever seen, and it was a further twenty minutes before the fish was finally boated, a magnificent specimen of about seventy pounds.’
      • ‘We moved a lot of fish in the first hour but only one was boated.’
      • ‘We wouldn't have boated nearly so many fish, but it would have been terrific sport.’
      • ‘On the second troll through I latched into a good fish and after a spirited fight we boated my first decent size Nile perch.’

Phrases

  • be in the same boat

    • informal Be in the same difficult circumstances as others:

      ‘do not despair: you are one of millions in the same boat’
      • ‘I know how you feel about having to use a PC at work… but I don't feel sorry for you, because I'm in the same boat.’
      • ‘Alarm bells started to ring, though, when Mrs Glover helped to set up a support group for other families in the same boat and an event was organised.’
      • ‘I have had friends who have had difficulties and there are so many people in the same boat.’
      • ‘I'm in the same boat as Richard Cole and Dr. Henry Lee, and some of the other people on your panel.’
      • ‘His wish is echoed by many citizens in the same boat: they live in the suburban areas around the city and go downtown to work every day.’
      • ‘We are all in the same boat: we both win and we both lose.’
      • ‘And it was about a sense of belonging and being among people who were in the same boat which they wanted projected.’
      • ‘I know this is not a nice thing to write, and once I was in the same boat, but I do wish workers would not converge on my supermarket at lunchtimes.’
      • ‘A lot of the other employees are in the same boat, having to worry about mortgages and other financial commitments.’
      • ‘If you're in the same boat, at least know you're not the only one.’
  • off the boat

    • offensive Recently arrived from a foreign country, and by implication naive or an outsider:

      ‘what are you, fresh off the boat?’
  • push the boat out

    • Be lavish in one's spending or celebrations:

      ‘from fine wines to the delights of the theatre, this is your chance to push the boat out’
      • ‘Helen said the family had pushed the boat out for Emma's special day, which started with champagne and strawberries.’
      • ‘Players are very expensive and the board have pushed the boat out.’
      • ‘SEA cadets in Wootton Bassett will really be pushing the boat out next month to celebrate their silver jubilee.’
      • ‘We wanted to push the boat out and do something a bit special.’
      • ‘This has been the consequence of the club pushing the boat out to recruit summer signings such as Steve Fulton, Greg Shields and Barry McLaughlin, all to the fore in the recent form upturn.’
      • ‘It's going to be tough to get it through before July, but I hope they see the situation has arisen and push the boat out to get it through.’
      • ‘Il Caffe is the best place for people-watching, and if you're pushing the boat out for dinner, L' Incontro, at the Academia side of the square, is hard to beat.’
      • ‘If you feel like really pushing the boat out, you could consider whisking mum away for a much deserved holiday.’
      • ‘Barnoldswick witnessed a spectacular organised display last Sunday pushing the boat out with a breathtaking show.’
      • ‘We are really pushing the boat out for having a library that's going to be proactive.’
      • ‘Parents of a profoundly deaf girl are pushing the boat out to say thank you to a Bradford charity.’
      • ‘You could add a good handful of ordinary basil if you're pushing the boat out.’
      • ‘Anyone wishing to push the boat out could add mushrooms, tomato, black pudding and hash browns to make up the ‘Full’ at £3.95.’
      • ‘So there was much to celebrate last night as the airport pushed the boat out on a party which was called Over the Moon.’
      • ‘But it's in his determination that his actors should improvise and ad lib on camera that Pawlikowski pushes the boat out.’
      • ‘Festival committee chairman John Norman said: ‘Get on board and push the boat out at Festival Five.’’
      • ‘‘The club pushed the boat out and got a real quality presentation for the players and staff,’ he said.’
      • ‘It wouldn't be pushing the boat out to say that chief among those ‘people’ would have been John Hartson.’
      • ‘If you're pushing the boat out, the sprawling Penfolds Grange room has its own gym, a two-person shower, twin free-standing baths and its own mini-wine cellar.’
      be extravagant, go on a spending spree, splash out, splurge, spare no expense, spend lavishly, spend a lot of money
      lash out, go mad, go on a shopping binge, indulge in some retail therapy
      View synonyms
  • rock the boat

    • informal Say or do something to disturb an existing situation and upset people:

      ‘I don't want to rock the boat’
      • ‘They feel compelled to be careful about what they say so as not to upset the people around them or rock the boat.’
      • ‘Together they are two mature, cash flow rich markets so long as no one rocks the boat.’
      • ‘They want to be sure that nobody rocks the boat and no major donors are offended.’
      • ‘They are upset that anyone is now rocking the boat and might endanger their hopes to become enriched.’
      • ‘For every thing that goes wrong one way they try to compensate by moving to the other extreme, this rocks the boat even more and they overcompensate back the other way.’
      • ‘Nothing rocks the boat of politicians or corporations more than written notice to commence boycotting.’
      • ‘What you'll find now is that arts and culture and cultural diversity cuts both sides of politics and no government will go to an election with a policy which effectively rocks the boat on that.’
      • ‘It's not true, and for a man to hear the message that the greatest achievement of his life is simply not rocking the boat, not offending anyone, not taking any risks but just being a genuinely swell guy - that kills him.’
      • ‘Angela Rippon rocks the boat gently with Cole Porter's marvellous musical.’
      • ‘It is obviously easier to move one person, who is not going to rock the boat, than two, who have rocked the boat, and have got off a discipline proceedings.’

Origin

Old English bāt, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

boat

/bəʊt/