Definition of blush in English:

blush

verb

  • 1no object Show shyness, embarrassment, or shame by becoming red in the face.

    ‘she blushed at the unexpected compliment’
    with complement ‘Kate felt herself blushing scarlet’
    • ‘Mackenzie didn't say anything and just blushed, his cheeks burning scarlet.’
    • ‘Rob lay down next to her, and reached out his hand, still blushing but ignoring his embarrassment and taking her hand in his.’
    • ‘Her friends started clapping loudly, hooting and hollering as Scarlet just blushed.’
    • ‘She blushed deeply from embarrassment and tears grew once more in the garden of her eyes.’
    • ‘I answered, blushing slightly, my shyness obvious in my soft yet high voice.’
    • ‘Now it was Gabe's turn to squirm and blush as crimson as roses.’
    • ‘Jennifer smiled at the way Scott blushed, the red flush working its way up from his neck to the top of his face.’
    • ‘He glared at her, and realised with embarrassment that he was blushing, which only made him blush all the more.’
    • ‘When he asked us why we were giving him a present, we just blushed - our shame at the real reason was interpreted as a crush.’
    • ‘She blushed a deep scarlet and I couldn't help but grin even more.’
    • ‘Well at least he thought she was blushing, the colour on her face was so varied it was hard to tell.’
    • ‘Claudia shook her head, blushing slightly in embarrassment as all eyes looked at them.’
    • ‘Anthony's hand brushed against mine ever so slightly as we were moving to get in, and I blushed a deep scarlet.’
    • ‘She looked down at herself, and blushed so deep a crimson it was easily visible through the white fur on her chest.’
    • ‘Scarlet blushed and they all leaned toward her but she began to walk off.’
    • ‘Thank God, there were no lights; I could so feel my face burn up, probably blushing.’
    • ‘I blushed further shades of embarrassment, trying to hide myself under my raven dark hair.’
    • ‘Tom humbly bowed his head and his cheeks blushed in the embarrassment.’
    • ‘She blushed scarlet, and saw that her father saw the whole thing, and was turning beat red.’
    • ‘I shook my head to clear the thought as my face blushed with shame.’
    redden, go pink, turn pink, go red, turn red, go crimson, turn crimson, go scarlet, turn scarlet, flush, colour, crimson, tint, burn up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Feel embarrassed or ashamed.
      with infinitive ‘he blushed to think of how he'd paraded himself’
      • ‘At one time, any hostess getting ready for a dinner party would blush for shame to think that she had bought her meal from a supermarket.’
      • ‘I get blushing kidneys in front of urinals if there's someone else within five paces of me.’
      • ‘I blush to think of such thanks for such crude work, but she was thankful.’
      • ‘He blushed, discomfited by the five pairs of eyes staring at him, and ruffled his hair.’
      • ‘But then, if financial scandals made you blush, the entire reconstruction of the country would be pretty mortifying.’
      • ‘I've made a few people blush mind you, but the death toll is still at zero.’
      embarrassed, ashamed, shamefaced, remorseful, mortified, conscience-stricken, humiliated, humbled, taken aback, disconcerted, nonplussed, discomfited, discomposed, distressed, chagrined, perturbed, confounded, dismayed, dumbfounded, crestfallen, sheepish, red-faced, blushing, confused, put out of countenance, discountenanced, with one's tail between one's legs
      View synonyms
  • 2often as adjective blushingliterary Be or become pink or pale red.

    ‘the trees are loaded with blushing blossoms’
    • ‘As you might imagine, its name gives a vivid word picture for the color changes, blushing from ivory to pink and finally red when mature.’
    • ‘From a distance, the blossoms look like pink clouds floating over blushing pools of fallen petals.’
    • ‘God knows what you said, but the dust beneath your feet blushed pink.’
    • ‘From Thursday on, the television cameras will beam sumptuous shots of loblolly pines and blushing azaleas around the world.’
    • ‘But the mountain still blushes with the palest of pinks, suffusing the blues that give an inkling of the intense cold.’
    pink, pinkish, rose-pink, rose-coloured, roseate, red, reddish, rose-red
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A reddening of the face as a sign of shyness, embarrassment, or shame.

    ‘he had brought a faint blush to her cheeks’
    • ‘A blush of anger and embarrassment heated her cheeks and her irritation was further stretched.’
    • ‘A blush reddens the silent girl's cheeks slowly, and Chester drops her fork in concern, eyes darting wildly from the girl to me.’
    • ‘Their button black eyes looked her over and lingered on certain areas that made her feel very uncomfortable and brought a faint blush to her cheeks.’
    • ‘I would be mortified cancelling someone who had flown 600 miles to see me, but important men don't sport the blush of shame.’
    • ‘I felt like an idiot, and she could see the blush of shame in my face.’
    • ‘A deep blush of embarrassment at being caught starring outside the window heated her cheeks and she looked down her hands, resting on her lap.’
    • ‘I could just picture her, her cheeks tinged with a faint blush, the way she always looked when she spoke to me.’
    • ‘I am not certain what to make of the tune but the video does bring a healthy blush to my cheeks.’
    • ‘Brian noticed this, and broke out in a sudden blush of embarrassment.’
    • ‘She brushed her fingers on her lips, as she felt a faint blush appear.’
    • ‘Lor gave a faint, but apparent sign of a blush in her cheek.’
    • ‘He raised his head to look at her, meeting her eyes and giving her a sly smile, causing a faint blush to appear on her cheeks.’
    • ‘Some of the comments are priceless and deserve to be preserved, with the hope that they might at some future date bring a blush of shame to the cheeks of the more honorable.’
    • ‘When she spoke of sexual abuse, a faint blush crept up her cheeks.’
    • ‘They smiled warmly at each other and a faint blush appeared on her cheeks.’
    • ‘‘You mean you,’ I pointed out, laughing when a faint blush crossed her cheeks.’
    • ‘That old nick name never went away, bringing a blush to her cheeks every time, it was a sign that her father was happy to see her.’
    • ‘The blush of shame was upon her cheek, and she hung her head.’
    • ‘I shook my head, feeling a faint blush on my cheeks.’
    • ‘She cried outrageously, a faint blush coming to her cheeks.’
    flush, reddening, high colour, colour, rosiness, pinkness, ruddiness, bloom
    View synonyms
  • 2A pink or pale red tinge.

    ‘the roses were white with a lovely pink blush’
    • ‘In the Near East white apricots are common, with pale skin and pink blush.’
    • ‘From the front view was the setting sun giving a blush of pink, peach, orange and some purple.’
    • ‘As he sprays reactive chemicals on the test strips, a pink blush spreads across the paper.’
    • ‘A bright hue, a rosy blush, pretty skin that's blemish free, and a plump shape - these are generally key for ripe fruits.’
    • ‘Pea-like flowers open to a lavender blush, then mellow to buff yellow and will perfume the garden from midsummer to autumn.’
    • ‘The market glittered with colour; the reds of the paprika, the deep blush of the red hot dried chillis.’
    • ‘As soft as a blush when one is complimented, a pink hue with the warm sweetness of jasmine in a bottle that too is a blush colour yet is more romantic in tone, luminous in feel.’
    • ‘Black, white and cream accentuated with shades of pink from soft blush through raspberry sorbet.’
    • ‘The small, tubular flowers are a translucent white with the faintest blush of rose.’
    • ‘Its general colouring is white tinged with rosy blush and it has two long red shaft tail streamers.’
    • ‘The sun sets with every shade of blush and rose imaginable lacing across the horizon.’
    tint, colour, shade, tone, hue, tincture, cast, flush
    View synonyms
  • 3often as modifier mass noun A wine with a slight pink tint made in the manner of white wine but from red grape varieties.

    ‘blush Zinfandel’
    • ‘A vin gris or blush wine is made as above but with no maceration.’
    • ‘The many new world wines, with the exception of American blush wines, are bolder, fruitier and frequently more alcoholic and should really be included as a third category.’
    • ‘So, if he wants to drink a blush wine from California, he will, thank you.’
    • ‘Dry and semi-dry roses or blush wines exhibit fresh and fruity flavors and have a moderately high level of acidity.’
    • ‘She took some fresh tarragon and began tearing the leaves into tiny strips, dropping them into the blush wine that made the base of the marinade.’
  • 4North American

    another term for blusher (sense 1)
    • ‘The foundation made her look so pale she'd had to use the blush and lipstick to give her face some color.’
    • ‘Skip blush and allow a bit of the skin's pink color to shine through on your cheeks.’
    • ‘I put on foundation, powder, blush, pale pink eye shadow, and pink lip-gloss.’
    • ‘Look for a great flat-top blush brush, like this one, for a really natural look.’
    • ‘The pink blush on the models make the whole look ‘prettier’ than the look in the other magazine.’
    • ‘With a little rose shaded lipstick and blush, she had to admit to herself that she looked hot.’
    • ‘No blush or pink cheeks, she knew she would already be blushing by herself later on.’
    • ‘She had used a light blush to make Mila's face pinker and a shimmery goldish-brown eyeshadow for her eyelids and dark, but not too dark, pink lipgloss for her mouth.’
    • ‘The lipsticks, eye shadows, blushes and translucent powder in this kit will help transform your looks in no time.’
    • ‘To get this look, Lori used silver shadow, a plummy cream blush and a white shimmer lip.’
    • ‘Remember to swipe an eye shadow or blush brush on the back of your hand before applying.’
    • ‘She put on mascara, navy blue eyeliner, dark blue eye shadow, pale pink lipstick, and pale peach blush.’
    • ‘Stick to powder blushes as well; cream formulas tend to make oily skin look even greasier.’
    • ‘I brushed a little blush on my pale cheeks, applied some blue eye shadow and light mascara, and combed my thick brown hair.’
    • ‘I had on a huge amount of blush and my lips were tinted a sparkling pink.’
    • ‘Her face glowed, smooth and flawless, her cheeks slightly pink with the blush Angie had used.’
    • ‘He was taking a baggie of what looked to be blush powder or something out of his pocket and evening out the skin tone.’
    • ‘She went through it carefully and then picked out black eyeliner, a skin tone colored eyeshadow, and a light pink blush.’
    • ‘Then, with a blush brush, gently apply a light pink color along cheekbones.’
    • ‘She pictured herself with pink lipstick and violet nail polish and a little blush.’

Phrases

  • at first blush

    • At the first glimpse or impression.

      ‘his next decision was at first blush disconcerting’
      • ‘She continued, ‘It certainly looks to the court, at first blush, that this was a deliberate concealment of information.’’
      • ‘However, to lay people symptoms of arsenic poisoning would appear at first blush to be a simple case of cardiac failure.’
      • ‘Without knowing more about the case it's difficult to comment on it accurately but it might seem at first blush to demonstrate that the law is skewed in favour of the burglar rather than the burgled.’
      • ‘So when talking to your kids, try to avoid these sneaky references to guns and ammunition, no matter how far fetched the link seems at first blush.’
      • ‘The text works and the rest of the show seem at first blush quite separate to one another but it was when we thought of how the images were made that it all came together.’
      • ‘The dancer in front of us was, at first blush, normal enough for a goth club.’
      • ‘But at first blush, we can see that there are numerous regulations that would come under your umbrella in terms of how you deal with officers who are complained about, in terms of the statutory provisions and procedure.’
      • ‘Well, at first blush, I would say that is reckless and negligent and destructive of innocent human life - potentially destructive of innocent human life.’
      • ‘As contradictory as this might seem at first blush, American political journalists have relatively little access to information about what is going on at any given moment.’
      • ‘It's not as radical as what it may seem at first blush.’
      • ‘Well, nobody's comfortable at first blush with the notion of not divulging everything.’
      • ‘This, too, seems to make perfect sense at first blush; but the important question in philosophy is what is done with such claims - what further claims they are used to support.’
      • ‘He said, at first blush, it didn't seem there was much to it.’
      • ‘It can indeed be rational to be resentful of, say, the cosmic pay scales of CEOs, or the passing on of massive inherited wealth - even if these don't appear at first blush to be any of your business.’
      • ‘Now, of course, the American public, as I think probably reacting fairly intelligently, putting it into a larger context, and does not seem at first blush to be absolutely taken aback and shocked.’
      • ‘His trick to gain confidence is to be so brutally forthcoming about his own personal and professional failings that his claims about the wrongdoings of others seem, at first blush, worth investigating.’
      • ‘The kind of universal electoral process you describe sounds wonderful at first blush and I might even consider voting for such a system.’
      • ‘The odd thing is that the language differences the researchers discovered would seem, at first blush, to be rather benign.’
      • ‘All this is pertinent to today's headlines, for a reason that may, at first blush, seem paradoxical.’
      • ‘But in the days that followed the massacre, it became clear that this violent event, however random it seemed at first blush, was not entirely unpredictable.’
  • spare (or save) someone's blushes

    • Refrain from causing someone embarrassment.

      ‘we will spare the blushes of those forecasters who notched up the biggest errors’
      • ‘Maybe he heard and thoughtfully spared my blushes.’
      • ‘Only a disputed knock-on saved the Irishmen 's blushes at the death, when the red shirts were manning the barricades in an effort to keep the Harlequins at bay.’
      • ‘Fortunately the writer asked for name to be withheld and the editor obliged, if only to spare the writer 's blushes.’
      • ‘Earlier supporters urged him to resolve the affair to spare the club 's blushes.’
      • ‘The sergeant, who has not been named to spare his blushes, scaled a tall gate at Trinity College when he spotted a figure ‘transfixed’ in the moonlight.’
      • ‘But he hesitated, which allowed the American to dash back and make a fine saving tackle to spare his blushes.’
      • ‘So why did Roberts, now 24, resort to such a drastic measure to spare her blushes permanently?’
      • ‘Although unbeaten so far this season not one York performance has been totally convincing, with good fortune saving their blushes on a number of occasions.’
      • ‘So Jim spared his blushes and asked him for a wee note on the subject.’
      • ‘The kitchen appliances were strategically placed to spare our blushes, but passers-by got a great view.’
      • ‘But, at the end of a game that was at times more windswept than interesting, the fact that his Livingston team-mates rallied round to scrape another narrow away win will help to spare his blushes.’
      • ‘But if we do go overboard at the office party, experts say we should try to spare our blushes.’
      • ‘It is the crudest but also the most telling moment of the conflict between them and the one scene where the censors have insisted on an 11-second cut to spare our blushes.’
      • ‘Befuddled villagers who were in a steam over a bizarre summer ritual have given themselves a pat on the back after chicken droppings saved their blushes.’
      • ‘A sculpture of a woman baring all has just gone on show at a North Yorkshire church - and already some indignant worshippers are asking for it to be removed to spare their blushes.’
      • ‘But if you have forgotten, an e-mail - or if the worst really does come to the worst, a text message - might be enough to save your blushes, salve your conscience and bring a smile to the face of your long-suffering mother.’
      • ‘They were nude, but certain props and a sunflower spared their blushes.’
      • ‘The team thinks the thieves will just dump the gear when they realise their boob and players are appealing for it to be returned to save their blushes in today's big match.’
      • ‘The diary will spare his blushes but let that be a warning.’
      • ‘The picture has been duly re-touched in order to spare his blushes.’

Origin

Old English blyscan; related to modern Dutch blozen.

Pronunciation

blush

/blʌʃ/