Definition of blurb in English:

blurb

noun

  • A short description of a book, film, or other product written for promotional purposes.

    • ‘Oh, and when you reach the website, read the promotional blurb.’
    • ‘Each jury panel selected three finalists, then composed a short blurb about each.’
    • ‘The blurb describes it as an ‘altogether morally confused piece of work’.’
    • ‘There was, in fact, discussion about such a note but however it was worded it sounded more like a promotional blurb than a serious warning.’
    • ‘If the message board allows it, you can even include a short promotional blurb about your site at the end of your posts.’
    • ‘If he has got a way with words, he might want to think about firing the person writing his promotional blurbs and doing it himself.’
    • ‘The blurb described the book as a private detective's journey through personal betrayal to a form of redemption.’
    • ‘I posted it anonymously because I also wrote a blurb for the book, and I didn't want to look as if I was piling on.’
    • ‘When they observe volunteers doing something great, they snap photos and display them along with the volunteers' names and short blurbs about their volunteer ministry on a display board in the lobby.’
    • ‘While I'm here, does anyone actually read the descriptive blurb on the back of dvds?’
    • ‘Indian, not Native American, is how his book blurbs describe him: in one short story in this collection a character dryly observes that ‘Native American’ is an oxymoron.’
    • ‘We all know how book blurbs and theatre notices can, by careful editing, turn critical comments into a rave review.’
    • ‘That this is the volume's main thrust is not apparent from the dust-jacket description or laudatory blurbs from colleagues.’
    • ‘I'm sure it takes a monstrous ego to be a White House speechwriter, but do these guys really believe their own promotional blurbs?’
    • ‘I'll write a nice blurb for his book first, though.’
    • ‘Your short little blurbs regarding faith based social services in Texas are reminiscent of the sound-bites we get from most mainstream media.’
    • ‘I find it fairly easy to blog while writing film scripts, articles, introductions, blurbs and short stories.’
    • ‘The writing is lively and fun to read; you can actually picture the film freaks foaming at the mouths as they wrote their film blurbs!’
    • ‘And while many fans read the short blurb as a shock, others saw this coming as clearly as a run-in chair shot.’
    • ‘A good friend of mine who was also my publisher at one time, wrote on the blurb of my book that my stories were about women's lives.’
    notice, announcement, bulletin
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verb

[with object]North American
informal
  • Write or contribute a blurb for (a book, film, or other product)

    ‘this is the first time I have blurbed a whole line of books’
    • ‘They were both kind enough to blurb the first book.’
    • ‘The great author blurbed this as a ‘most amusing little book’ that ‘is far more than that’: ‘While it makes us laugh it exposes with uncanny insight many of our secret wishes and unexpressed desires.’’
    • ‘I have been asked to blurb it, and I am recommending it now to all of you.’
    • ‘Careful readers will notice that, in the middle of the review, there is a lovely, entirely positive sentence, suitable for back-cover blurbing!’
    • ‘So mostly they don't get read and mostly they don't get blurbed.’
    • ‘Maybe if he blurbed my book it wouldn't be considered Chick Lit anymore.’
    • ‘So you blurb the writer rather than the book, so you just know that that's going to be the one they stick on the cover.’
    • ‘Yes, I heard it's very good and in fact they sent it to me to blurb but I was doing something…’
    • ‘They blurb books, explain pop culture phenomena and offer unsolicited counsel to celebrities in crisis.’
    • ‘No writer has excoriated the thirst for fame with more vigor in recent years - and yet here we have an actor (whom you lovingly pimped years ago in the magazine) blurbing your book.’
    • ‘I mean, a critic has to have an agenda to take the people who blurbed the book to task: they were all sentenced by him to ‘perdition eternal.’’
    • ‘A novelist blurbed the hardback: ‘She'll take you farther from home than you ever dreamed you'd go.’’
    • ‘Lots and lots and lots of requests coming in for me to read and blurb people's books, or write introductions to things, to all of which at present the answer has to be no.’
    • ‘He glowingly blurbed the book as ‘splendid and wholly convincing’.’
    publicize, make public, make known, give publicity to, bill, post, announce, broadcast, proclaim, trumpet, shout from the rooftops, give notice of, call attention to, promulgate
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Origin

Early 20th century: coined by Gelett Burgess (died 1951), American humorist.

Pronunciation

blurb

/bləːb/