Main definitions of blue in English

: blue1blue2

blue1

adjective

  • 1Of a colour intermediate between green and violet, as of the sky or sea on a sunny day:

    ‘the clear blue sky’
    ‘a blue silk shirt’
    ‘deep blue eyes’
    • ‘With blue skies and temperatures in the 80s, southeast Alaska doesn't feel like a rainforest.’
    • ‘If I only have to choose between green or blue scrubs then my brain has much less information to process and mess up.’
    • ‘Each of these pixels has a red, green, or blue filter placed over it, and a light is shone from behind the screen.’
    • ‘The sun was up, the sky was blue, there wasn't a cloud to spoil the view.’
    • ‘The water was quite calm and the sky was blue.’
    • ‘Hot springs oozing from an underground volcano adds tints of yellow and green to the blue ocean.’
    • ‘Beneath the cloudy sky, the green and blue shade cast by the giant trees fell in a mottled pattern on the forest floor.’
    • ‘It was a typical tranquil morning, bright sunshine, blue sea, green trees softening the light.’
    • ‘Some of the crystals, especially those occurring with tourmaline, show a blue core and green rim.’
    • ‘The painting shows a Victorian scene in green, pink and blue colours on a cream background.’
    • ‘Out across the water, Iona lay basking under an astonishingly blue Hebridean sky.’
    • ‘We both love the color red and how it looks with the sage green and pale blue trim on our house.’
    • ‘The chameleon is sometimes green, sometimes blue, it is all colours by turn, and sometimes it is absolutely colourless.’
    • ‘The snow-capped mountains, rolling hills and deep blue sky paint a picture no artist could draw.’
    • ‘She was wearing her blue school uniform.’
    • ‘The canal was an endless wall of sun-faded and sea-beaten red, green, and blue boats.’
    • ‘Take your grey bin, green bin, blue bag and green box and place them on the footpath outside your property, and leave them there, seven days a week.’
    • ‘At the age of seventy, his blue eyes still twinkle under a mop of corkscrew curls.’
    • ‘I put on my best pair of jeans and my favorite blue top.’
    • ‘Water of different depth shows different colours in the sunshine such as yellow, green, blue and transparent.’
    sky-blue, azure, sapphire, cerulean, oxford blue, cambridge blue, ultramarine, lapis lazuli, indigo, aquamarine, turquoise, cyan, of the colour of the sky, of the colour of the sea
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a person's skin) having turned blue as a result of cold or breathing difficulties:
      ‘Ashley went blue and I panicked’
      • ‘Victims suffered from acute cyanosis, a blue discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes.’
      • ‘One day, she turned blue and stopped breathing.’
      • ‘There may also be obvious cyanosis (when the lips and/or skin appears blue due to lack of oxygen in the blood).’
      • ‘He used to go blue during the feed so I would sit him up and blow in his face and he would gasp for breath and continue his feed.’
      • ‘She turned blue whenever she cried, and the doctor said it would be a miracle if she lived past her first month.’
    2. 1.2 (of a bird or other animal) having blue markings:
      ‘a blue jay’
      • ‘He had one arm hanging by his side and the other had a small blue beetle crawling over it.’
      • ‘The powdery blue kingfisher has a more varied diet than the name suggests.’
      • ‘A blue worm threading its way through sploshes of paint leaves me cold.’
      • ‘According to zoology, the origin of blue bull is not traced to the species of cow.’
      • ‘Plumage on a mature blue goose is a deep slate tone except for a white head and, in some, a buff-colored belly.’
      • ‘Animals include duikers, eland and colobus, vervet and blue monkeys.’
      • ‘Perhaps the boys will even be somewhere in the stands at Loftus - a small band of red dragons in a sea of blue bulls.’
      • ‘I should have told you in previous episodes that anger is characterised by a red bear, sloth by a light blue goat, and avarice by a yellow frog.’
      • ‘The rest of its body looked as if it were a giant blue lizard, standing on its hind legs like an angered bear.’
      • ‘There's a pond visited by ducks, geese, blue herons, otters, deer and the odd bear.’
      • ‘In particular searches have been made for the kiwi, blue duck, yellow head and the South Island kokako.’
      • ‘Every spring, about 100 pairs nest here along with great blue herons and snowy egrets.’
      • ‘Among the thriving wildlife, native birds such as superb blue wren compete for a mate.’
      • ‘Clouds of metallic blue butterflies dispersed off their gold and waxen perches and rippled over his head.’
      • ‘He bent down and pinned the little, blue hummingbird onto Rupert's winter jacket and leaned back with satisfaction.’
      • ‘Out of the sky, a huge, blue eagle flew out from the sky, small black marks over him, his golden eyes burning.’
      • ‘A gaggle of Catholic nuns from Kerala, in full habits, delicately dipped their feet like pale blue wading birds.’
      • ‘Morpho menelaus is a kind of bright blue butterfly, but also has a slight purple colour.’
      • ‘Start early and you may surprise little green or great blue herons prowling the shallows.’
      • ‘A blue eagle kept circling over them, so Conor and Beolagh hid in the Prince's coat pockets.’
    3. 1.3 (of a cat, fox, or rabbit) having fur of a smoky grey colour:
      ‘the blue fox’
      • ‘The Korat is an elegant silver-tipped blue cat which has a unique colour that appears to absorb light, resulting in an intense sheen often described as a halo effect and best appreciated in the sunlight.’
      • ‘She admires the drawing above the oven: a drawing of the blue fox howling at the moon.’
      • ‘On the way we saw a blue fox cross the road.’
      • ‘He grabs the shredded pieces of his drawing: the blue fox howling at the moon.’
      • ‘He was a blue cat named Paul, a sweet little fellow with a pleasant disposition.’
    4. 1.4 (of a ski run) of the second-lowest level of difficulty, as indicated by blue markers positioned along it.
      • ‘And to return to the southern lodge, forget it, you are forced with either a black trail or a long and very challenging blue trail.’
      • ‘The rest of the trail is rated blue/intermidiate but I think that it's only due to some recent storm damage from earlier this year.’
      • ‘Last year the trail was rated blue (moderate) and the rating for this next year is not decided yet.’
      • ‘‘It will be great fun and the good thing is that anybody can join in, as long as they can ski the blue runs,’ said Nina.’
      • ‘There are just a few chair lifts that end where the blue trail crosses the cliff.’
    5. 1.5Physics Denoting one of three colours of quark.
      • ‘This blue quark will become red and the original red quark will become blue.’
      • ‘A blue quark will bind with a red quark and a yellow.’
      • ‘So for instance, we could start off with a red quark, which emits a red-antiblue gluon and becomes a blue quark.’
      • ‘For example, if absorption of a gluon changes a blue quark into a red quark, then the gluon itself must have carried one unit of red charge and minus one unit of blue charge.’
      • ‘So there must be a red quark, a blue quark and a green quark.’
  • 2informal (of a person or mood) melancholy, sad, or depressed:

    ‘he's feeling blue’
    • ‘When I'm blue I find nothing more therapeutic than cleaning up around the house a little.’
    • ‘The blue mood of yesterday seems to have lifted a little.’
    • ‘However, a third consecutive league defeat after conceding a goal from a set-piece left the Baggies players feeling blue.’
    • ‘Maybe the rain brings more blue mood for me and a three year anniversary reminds me to look back to see what happened in the days before.’
    • ‘He joked around with Dallas, played games with him and cheered him up when he felt blue.’
    • ‘The majority of the record is mid-tempo and the dreamy guitars and harmonies throughout manage to create a blue mood.’
    • ‘The air then turned blue as Smith gave vent to his feelings both on the way back to the dressing room and, even more volubly, in the dressing room.’
    • ‘Deep in their own blue mood, they're unaffected by people or events that are going on around them.’
    depressed, down, sad, saddened, unhappy, melancholy, miserable, sorrowful, gloomy, dejected, downhearted, disheartened, despondent, dispirited, low, in low spirits, low-spirited, heavy-hearted, glum, morose, dismal, downcast, cast down, tearful
    View synonyms
  • 3informal (of a film, joke, or story) having sexual or pornographic content:

    ‘a blue movie’
    • ‘Video cassettes showing blue films and cinema houses lost out to the village gurdwara.’
    • ‘However, airport sources claimed some employees were watching a blue film and accidentally sent it out on the airport's television sets.’
    • ‘‘My father never swore in his life or told a blue joke, but he was magic.’’
    • ‘We have the same sort of content as the women's classes but there is the odd slightly blue joke, too.’
    • ‘Would you be content with watching a blue movie instead of doing the real thing?’
    indecent, dirty, rude, coarse, vulgar, bawdy, lewd, racy, risqué, salacious, naughty, wicked, improper, unseemly, smutty, spicy, raw, off colour, ribald, rabelaisian
    View synonyms
  • 4British informal Politically conservative:

    ‘the successful blue candidate’
    • ‘The vast majority in the wealth creating areas of Southern England voted blue.’
    • ‘But given the complexities of blue camp politics we have to ask: On a roll to where?’
    • ‘‘Where people have voted blue, their councils have gone green,’ he wrote.’
    • ‘The blue political parties, meanwhile, are closing the floodgates with all their might.’
    • ‘‘All over the country, communities have voted blue and gone green,’ he said.’

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Blue colour or pigment:

    ‘she was dressed in blue’
    ‘the dark blue of his eyes’
    [count noun] ‘armchairs in pastel blues and greens’
    • ‘It's cluttered and the colours (dark blue and purple) will not be to many people's tastes.’
    • ‘The water-resistant fabric is available in blue, green or natural.’
    • ‘The Thursday evening changes are marked in red; the Friday changes in blue.’
    • ‘One in brilliant yellow, another scarlet red and the two remaining were adorned in blue and glass green.’
    • ‘Using strong colours like dark blue, deep reds and yellows, her work is certainly striking.’
    • ‘All samples are shown at the same magnification, with spindles in green and DNA in blue.’
    • ‘Inside are piles of battered registers, marked with the date in blue.’
    • ‘Designers took the traditional Masonic colours - green and gold - and wove in blue and black.’
    • ‘If it is in red ink, the letter is false; if in blue, it is true.’
    • ‘It is even available in bright colours like blue, green, yellow and orange.’
    • ‘As one would stare upwards, the sky would change from red, to orange, to green, to dark blue, to royal purple.’
    • ‘Familiar in its colourless form, it also occurs in a wide range of strong colours including blue, green, pink, and yellow.’
    • ‘This being the set I reviewed, they also come in blue, yellow, green sliver and black.’
    • ‘There was a photograph on the wall of a model with tresses boldly streaked in blue - I was concerned.’
    • ‘Just remember, if you see text in blue in this article, that means we clipped it from the editorial section.’
    • ‘I was hoping she'd turn up to work the next day in blue and green, but she didn't.’
    • ‘The words in blue are ‘hyperlinks’ and clicking on them will take you to an area with more information.’
    • ‘The vehicle involved, which had also been damaged, had been a light green or blue in colour, although the make or model was not known.’
    • ‘My room is colored in blue with glow in the dark stars and planets on them.’
    • ‘She had the children in mind in choosing colours, wares, right down to bathroom sets in blue for boys and pink for girls.’
    1. 1.1 Blue clothes or material:
      ‘Susan wore blue’
      • ‘The boys in blue responded in the best manner on the scoreboard.’
      • ‘He always picks out white shirts until he doesn't have any left, and then he wears blue.’
      • ‘You open the door and there they are, the boys and girls in blue.’
      • ‘The old man was robed in deep blue with a cloak of the same purple the guards wore.’
      • ‘She wore a gown of startling blue, hinting that her name should have been Sapphire.’
      • ‘You wear red and the sovereign wears blue, but there are so many other colors in the world.’
      • ‘Had Chelsea decided to follow McNeill's nose, Ronaldo might now be wearing blue not red.’
      • ‘Di Canio, who will be out of contract with West Ham in June, wants to finish his playing days wearing the claret and blue.’
      • ‘Unlike the shades of blue which she wore currently, the shirts were a light grey, the pants, black.’
      • ‘The twins at this point was her age and the girl had dyed her hair a light orange color and wore colored contacts of blue.’
      • ‘He will be at Leederville Oval on Monday but he won't be wearing red and blue.’
      • ‘The principal was a tall woman that usually always wore red but today she was wearing blue.’
      • ‘I haven't seen as poor a performance from the men in blue.’
      • ‘Those who wore gray were for it, and those who wore blue were against it.’
      • ‘The police wear blue because that is the color of the police only and no one else.’
      • ‘Caroline finished her toilette by herself, wearing a simple morning frock of blue.’
      • ‘Mother was wearing a heavily embroidered gown of light blue that suited her perfectly for once.’
      • ‘Suddenly the door slid open, and a tall man wearing nothing but blue came into the room.’
      • ‘The men wore a similar hairstyle, all ages and genders wearing shades of blue.’
      • ‘Andrew, wearing all blue, created by metallic clothing, walks into a small office.’
    2. 1.2 The blue ball in snooker, billiards, and similar games.
    3. 1.3
      another term for bluing
    4. 1.4the blueliterary The sky or sea, or the unknown:
      ‘far out upon the blue were many sails’
  • 2[usually with modifier] A small butterfly, the male of which is predominantly blue while the female is typically brown.

    • ‘It was easy to get the species mixed up as the female blues that had orange spots on the upper hindwing (see the photograph on the right) were Chalkhill Blues.’
    • ‘But blues fascinate butterfly experts with their mind-boggling complexity.’
    • ‘As caterpillars, the blues are carefully cleaned and fed.’
    • ‘The male blues show much more interest in these yellow bushes.’
    • ‘A cool day in midsummer is always a good day to watch blues taking shelter in the grass.’
  • 3British A person who has represented Cambridge University (a Cambridge blue) or Oxford University (an Oxford blue) at a particular sport in a match between the two universities:

    ‘a flyweight boxing blue’
    • ‘An accomplished swimmer since his schooldays, David was a university blue in water polo and later served the sport in other capacities.’
    • ‘He was an Oxford Blue, a first-class cricketer and quite good at polo.’
    • ‘He was an Oxford blue in hockey and a regular columnist on hockey in the London press.’
    • ‘At university he was a double blue in swimming and soccer.’
    • ‘He could spring the surprise shock of the season by beating the blues at Stamford Bridge but you would need to believe in miracles as well as the tooth fairy for that!’
    1. 3.1 A distinction awarded to a Cambridge blue or an Oxford blue:
      ‘Adrian's brother won a rugby blue in December’
      • ‘He has a rugby blue, and he does not bother to list either distinction in his Who's Who entry because he also possesses the virtue of restraint.’
      • ‘His main sport was the unglamorous pursuit of golf, for which he gained a blue at Oxford.’
      • ‘After winning a blue at Oxford University, he was signed by Premiership club Bath.’
      • ‘He ended up with all sorts of blues when he went to university, different sports.’
      • ‘Drew was a sports enthusiast, earned a rugby blue at Cambridge, and played rugby for the England B team.’
  • 4Australian NZ informal An argument or fight:

    ‘did you have a blue or what?’
    • ‘He told me that Crystal and himself had had a blue with a taxi driver as well, not as big a blue as I had with mine, but a blue all the same.’
    • ‘She had a blue with her then boyfriend, fast bowler Mick.’
    • ‘I had a blue with a mate, ending the friendship.’
    • ‘I can honestly say that I never started a blue, but my stupid pig-headed nature would not allow me to back down.’
    • ‘He then joined the fracas, slipping in two or three good blows before the blue was broken up.’
  • 5Australian NZ informal A mistake:

    ‘his tactical blue in saying the opposition wasn't ready to govern’
    • ‘Has Frank made a blue when compiling his stats?’
    • ‘What about a Prime Minister who calls them as he sees them and if he's made a blue just be man enough to come into the House of Representatives and say, ‘Look, a bit of a mistake here, here's correction of the parliamentary record.’’
    • ‘I used to be bemused how left wingers have an incapability to ever admit they made a blue.’
    • ‘‘We made a bit of a blue there,’ Anderton said.’
    • ‘I've made a bit of a blue with this Challenge!’
  • 6Australian NZ informal A nickname for a red-headed person:

    ‘only an Aussie could make a red-headed man ‘Blue.’’
    • ‘The flight attendants crack jokes, the check-in staff actually smile and even the airline's name for its red-and-white planes is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the Aussie habit of calling redheads "Blue''.’
    • ‘Hey red, in Australia we call redheads ‘blue’ or ‘bluey’.’
  • 7British informal A supporter of the Conservative Party.

    • ‘Amid all the hysteria over ‘hug a hoodie’, he has been falling over himself to show how environmentally friendly he is, that the Blues are the Greenest party ever to exist.’
    • ‘The Blues are also the largest party in Vale Royal where all the seats up for election and the count is on Friday.’

verb

  • 1Make or become blue:

    [with object] ‘the light dims, bluing the retina’
    ‘blued paper’
    [no object] ‘the day would haze, the air bluing with afternoon’
    • ‘All there were were tiny wisps of clouds now and the whole area had blued out.’
    • ‘I was up all night listening to music when a light blued the east, announcing the season of breakfast.’
    • ‘The sky was now bluing up as the time approached 4 PM.’
    • ‘The atmosphere in this video is darkened yet strangely luminous, the video palette seemingly blued and grayed.’
    1. 1.1[with object] Heat (metal) so as to give it a greyish-blue finish:
      ‘nickel-plated or blued hooks’
      • ‘The barrels are nicely blued, and some small parts, like the lock bolts, were brilliantly heal blued for contrast.’
      • ‘The gun was bead blasted around the top of the slide and bottom of the frame and the flats were given a nice, even polish before bluing.’
      • ‘Weatherby barrels and actions were polished and blued to a glittering, mirror-bright finish.’
      • ‘Sight choices are the same as offered on the 1895, the dovetails for rear sight and magazine tube are filled, and the entire gun is then matte blued or matte hard chromed.’
      • ‘Yes, it is a 16 penny nail that has been polished up a bit and blued.’
      • ‘Having owned several and examined many others I see no difference in terms of overall fit and finish, metal polishing and bluing, or action smoothness.’
      • ‘As a final touch to the metalwork, all exterior surfaces were detailed and polished by hand, preparatory to burnishing and bluing.’
      • ‘Yes, all the metal is well polished and deeply blued.’
      • ‘All in all, it is an attractive rifle, with nicely blued metal contrasting with an attractive piece of walnut.’
      • ‘The slide and its components are nicely polished and blued.’
      • ‘The barrels' subtle blue-grey colors result from charcoal bluing.’
      • ‘However, over the last two decades bluing and case coloring, as well as nickel plating, have improved significantly, resulting in a most attractive revolver.’
      • ‘The entire pistol was then fine bead blasted and blued.’
      • ‘The steel of the action and barrel is beautifully machined, polished and blued.’
      • ‘Eventually this sixgun will be totally refinished, in this case restored to its original appearance with case-hardened frame and hammer and the balance of the gun deeply blued.’
      • ‘In the past, a turkey hunter used his regular shotgun, which might have a blued or even a nickel-finished barrel and a glossy stock.’
      • ‘When welding the tool steel which firearms are made, the metal has to be protected from excessive heat, or hard spots will develop showing up as the dreaded plum-color when blued.’
      • ‘The hammer, trigger, and trigger guard are also blued to a mirror-like finish, and the sides of the frame sport a somewhat subdued finish, contrasting nicely with the rest of the gun.’
      • ‘In actuality, those original pistols - while beautifully machined and blued - were basically military pistols, with gritty trigger pulls and average accuracy.’
      • ‘The bottom metal appears to be an investment casting, but it has good lines, is functional and nicely polished and blued like the rest of the metalwork on the gun.’
  • 2historical [with object] Wash (white clothes) with bluing:

    ‘they blued the shirts and starched the uniforms’
    • ‘She would blue the laundry / For the children.’
    • ‘A couple of wooden benches at the side of the house in the shade held 3 big galvanized iron tubs for washing, rinsing and bluing the clothes, and a tin dish for the starch.’
    • ‘I blued the laundry.’
    • ‘I rinsed and blued most of them.’
    • ‘Washing was a long involved process which started with making the soap using lye, lard and ashes, then scrubbing, boiling, rinsing and bluing the clothes in huge outdoor vats of water.’

Phrases

  • boys in blue

    • informal Policemen; the police:

      ‘two dozen boys in blue arrive in full riot gear’
  • blue on blue

    • Denoting or relating to an attack made by one's own side that accidentally harms one's own forces:

      ‘blue-on-blue incidents’
      • ‘If I had been told on the day that Christopher died that it had been blue on blue, I could have coped with that, things do happen in war, mistakes are made, casualties, it happens.’
      • ‘Now though, blue on blue is just more military argot for killing men on your own side, or ‘friendly fire’, just as ‘wound response’ was Pentagon cant during the Vietnam War for a successful strike.’
      • ‘War is all about hurting people and breaking things, mistakes like blue on blue and civilian deaths happen.’
      • ‘The Air Force is basically saying what it is going to do in order to discharge its mission of controlling the high ground, and pointing out as it goes along that there may be implications, collateral damage and blue on blue incidents.’
      • ‘We're pretty safe against blue on blue, friendly fire, because we usually have a tank in front of us and a Bradley armored vehicle in back of us.’
  • bung (or stack) on a blue

    • informal Make a fuss or create a disturbance:

      ‘we're only reported if we bung on a blue’
      • ‘I promise you I'll never bung on a blue.’
      • ‘“Next time, you think better than to bung on a blue with a Tejano, eh? Ain't nobody better with a gun." he said’
      • ‘I'd half expected him to bung on a blue, but he didn't.’
      • ‘If he decides to stack on a blue over this, I'll be the first bloke out of the firing line.’
      • ‘He will have two choices — to cop it sweet, or stack on a blue.’
  • do something until (or till) one is blue in the face

    • informal Put all one's efforts into doing something to no avail:

      ‘she could talk to him until she was blue in the face, but he was just not hearing’
      • ‘I could tell him till I was blue in the face that we had to leave, he does not understand, he is not from here.’
      • ‘I just sulked all the way home cussing and swearing till I was blue in the face.’
      • ‘Obviously, we could sit here and talk until we're blue in the face about how wonderfully they play the game.’
      • ‘I complained and complained and complained until I was blue in the face.’
      • ‘I searched every file I could till I was blue in the face, and got absolutely nowhere!’
  • out of the blue

    • informal Without warning; unexpectedly:

      ‘she phoned me out of the blue’
      • ‘This came out of the blue, and we are most upset that a warning wasn't given.’
      • ‘As for how the opportunity was spotted, it was a complete bolt out of the blue.’
      • ‘The government's interest in sexual health has not come out of the blue.’
      • ‘The yellow card came out of the blue and I do not believe there was any warning from the referee.’
      • ‘Philip's voice is completely casual, like he's just had this sudden thought out of the blue.’
      • ‘It always comes slamming down out of a clear blue sky, unplanned and unforeseen.’
      • ‘Stephen phoned out of the blue, haven't spoken to him in over three months!’
      • ‘He called me yesterday, out of the blue, basically to offer me some work.’
      • ‘After six weeks the trail seemed to be going cold when a phone call came out of the blue.’
      • ‘This particular warning came out of the blue and there must be a worry that there is yet more to come.’
      • ‘Then, last month, I got a phone call out of the blue from one of the photo managers at Head Office.’
      • ‘Than he calls me up kind of out of the blue and it's just this weird, random kind of thing.’
      • ‘He was working as a meat products salesman during the 1960s, when his chance to run the pub came out of the blue.’
      • ‘Now, out of the blue, my own bank, write to me to tell me that they may have inadvertently ripped me off.’
      • ‘This hasn't been done out of the blue and they have been given every chance to stop doing it.’
      • ‘His was a performance out of the blue but one that he certainly can repeat again as he grows in confidence.’
      • ‘Quite frankly, this piece of research is so unexpected, so out of the blue, it beggars belief.’
      • ‘Because all of a sudden, almost out of the blue, the summer had ended and college was the immediate future.’
      • ‘Rarely does a profit warning come out of the blue like the subsequent share price reaction suggests.’
      • ‘It's a bit worrying because this guy actually knows where I live and has dropped round out of the blue but not for a long time.’
  • talk a blue streak

    • Speak continuously and at great length.

      • ‘The Chorus leader and, of course, Electra talk a blue streak.’
      • ‘Thus he asks Rick-the-coward, who talks a blue streak about the dancing contest, the confrontation with the jocks, the pictures, and the confrontation with Hattie.’
      • ‘Reading it is like trying to keep up with a fast walker who is also talking a blue streak.’
      • ‘Unfortunately I know very little about them because I talked a blue streak from the moment they stepped in the door to the moment the door closed behind them when they left.’
      • ‘She hadn't slept for three days, and talked a blue streak.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French bleu, ultimately of Germanic origin and related to Old English blǣwen ‘blue’ and Old Norse blár dark blue (see also blaeberry).

Pronunciation:

blue

/bluː/

Main definitions of blue in English

: blue1blue2

blue2

verb

British
informal, dated
  • Squander or recklessly spend (money).

    • ‘It doesn't matter which sum you will transfer (1 $, 10$or 100$) because you don't blue your money, you save human life!’
    • ‘It is again time to break open a bottle of bubbly and to blue our money till kingdom comes.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: perhaps a variant of blow.

Pronunciation:

blue

/bluː/