Main definitions of blubber in English

: blubber1blubber2

blubber1

noun

mass noun
  • 1The fat of sea mammals, especially whales and seals.

    • ‘Because the seal's layer of blubber does not extend to its flippers, veins in the flippers lie close to the surface of the skin, poorly insulated from the ice and cold water.’
    • ‘The answer is all too mundane: The blobs are old whale blubber.’
    • ‘He was trying to tell me all you get to eat in Japan is raw fish and whale blubber for every meal.’
    • ‘The name was coined by whalers, who considered the species the ‘right’ whale to hunt because its blubber makes dead whales float, aiding recovery of the carcass.’
    • ‘They are knee-deep in gelid gray water, with food and clothing, skinned seagulls and whale blubber, sheepskins and oilskins - the ancient flotsam of death at sea - sloshing about them.’
    • ‘The tongue of the whale was regarded as a delicacy, while salted whale blubber could be bought in any French town.’
    • ‘After they killed the whale - in what looked like food sharing - one killer whale held down the carcass as the others tore the thick, resilient gray whale skin and blubber.’
    • ‘Fourteen years later, Norway is preparing to resume the international trade in whale meat with a 10 ton shipment of meat and blubber from minke whales destined for Iceland.’
    • ‘Young and old chewed thin slices of raw whale blubber as quickly as it was being cut off the carcass.’
    • ‘Whale meat and blubber is shared out locally, and a small amount is sold to pay for the upkeep of boats.’
    • ‘At this point I am taking a coffee break as I retch once again at the thought of whale blubber sitting unhappily in my oesophagus.’
    • ‘Usually a scientist shows up and says of course it's… whale blubber and covers it up.’
    • ‘The smell of the sea was in the air as picnickers feasted on sun-dried halibut, muktuk, whale blubber, and Greenland raisin cake.’
    • ‘But that business is encountering its own problems, specifically a bottleneck in processing seal blubber for nutritional supplements.’
    • ‘The amount of contaminants in the meat of sea mammals is also low, but the level of contamination in the blubber of seals and whales is high.’
    • ‘Fish oil supplements are derived from a variety of sources, including mackerel, herring, tuna, salmon, cod liver, halibut, whale blubber and seal blubber.’
    • ‘Charcoal, Propane, Mesquite, whale blubber, whatever gives you the taste that you desire.’
    • ‘In the 19th century it became an important port of call for ships, whose crews also picked up whale blubber and seal skins there.’
    • ‘In other words, there's more to whales and sharks than blubber and dorsal fins; and the sooner we acknowledge this, the longer we may last in the evolutionary game of snakes-and-ladders.’
    • ‘Prior to kerosene lamps, most lamps consisted of whale blubber.’
    fat, fatty tissue
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    1. 1.1informal, derogatory Excessive human fat.
      ‘my six-pack is quickly being covered in blubber’
      • ‘No, not fat as in gross blubber bouncing around my waist and stuff; it's just that I think I'm about a few pounds heavier than I was when I was really fit in first year.’
      • ‘A word every prep fears, due to the fact they hate seeing a little bit of blubber on anyone, especially themselves.’
      • ‘Maybe then I'll lose some of my blubber, 'cause really you didn't have much to lose, sweet cheeks.’
      • ‘In my case, in addition to my belly, my chest was still misshaped from carrying too much blubber.’
      • ‘I decided to do it just because I have lived with a little too much blubber around my middle for my entire life although the rest of me is quite lean and fat-less.’
      • ‘Yes I am losing my blubber, but I have tonnes of it left to lose.’
      fat, excessive weight, fatness, plumpness, bulk
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adjective

archaic
  • (of a person's lips) swollen or protruding.

    • ‘There are so many celebrities/non-celebrities that are willing to pay lots of money to have the plastic surgeon to give them that blubber lips.’
    • ‘She pouted out t her blubber-lips, as if to bellows up wind and sputter in her horse-nostrils; and her chin was curdled, and more than usually prominent with passion.’
    • ‘He sat down with dignity, answered diplomatically certain mysterious questions about the dames, and applied his blubber lips to a handsome mouthpiece of lemon-coloured amber.’
    • ‘When I looked at his face I saw his blubber lips twitching with the efforts of attempted smile, but he couldn't quite carry it off.’
    • ‘Yet the movement of his blubber lips, closely pressed together, showed clearly that he could not understand a word.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the foaming of the sea, also a bubble on water): perhaps symbolic; compare with blob and blotch.

Pronunciation

blubber

/ˈblʌbə/

Main definitions of blubber in English

: blubber1blubber2

blubber2

verb

[no object]informal
  • Cry noisily and uncontrollably; sob.

    ‘he was blubbering like a child’
    with direct speech ‘‘I don't like him,’ blubbered Jonathan’
    • ‘If you ask me these cry babies are simply looking for their fifteen minutes of fame, but surely there are smarter ways to embarrass yourself than to sit around blubbering in an empty football stadium.’
    • ‘I ate buckwheat noodles with rooster sauce and blubbered about having ‘ruined Passover.’’
    • ‘Bring up their two little girls and I'll probably start blubbering.’
    • ‘Ada was blubbering now, tears and snot running down a red face, she opened her mouth to say one more thing, but at the last moment found some resolve.’
    • ‘All you do is sob uncontrollably in the fetal position while blubbering, ‘I miss my Nana!’’
    • ‘The same folks blubbering about the reigning obsession with thinness as an insult to fatness are making a disgusting mockery of starving people's plight.’
    • ‘After a about another half an hour of crying, blubbering, and her trying to tell me how she felt, she finally fell asleep and I softly moved her head to her pillow.’
    • ‘So in lieu of packing, I spent Saturday sniffling and blubbering over two years of Scottish detritus.’
    • ‘Now she's blubbering away all over again about something else.’
    • ‘Cassidy placed a firm kiss on his cheeks and ushered herself out of the door before the tears could break through the mental dam and she began blubbering again.’
    • ‘She was crying and blubbering, unable to believe what I was doing.’
    • ‘Back in the light, I turned to find an eight-year-old blubbering at my side.’
    • ‘At last, he asked: ‘How can we help you?’, on which cue I burst into tears and blubbered incoherently.’
    • ‘He whinnied for his lost mother all that first day and night, blubbering in the corner of the pasture, and he clung to his resentment as he grew into a half-ton adolescent.’
    • ‘Observing so much beauty in a single evening made me exhausted, blubbering like a little girl.’
    • ‘Mum asked me why I was crying and I blubbered, ‘Everything.’’
    • ‘I burst into tears, blubbering to his retreating form.’
    • ‘Somehow that thought doesn't seem so foreign, the way she's whimpering and carrying on like that, shaking and blubbering like an overgrown and very ugly baby.’
    • ‘She sobbed, wailed, blubbered, howled, cried and whatever people do to express sorrow hoping that her tears and crying will bring her other half back.’
    • ‘Finally, blubbering and whining, the papa bear - triumph of American technology - just gave up.’
    cry, sob, weep, shed tears, wail, snivel, whimper, howl, mewl, squall
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: probably symbolic; compare with blob and blubber.

Pronunciation

blubber

/ˈblʌbə/