Definition of blow the whistle on in English:

blow the whistle on

phrase

informal
  • Bring an illicit activity to an end by informing on (the person responsible).

    • ‘Bedard had contended she was forced out of her job at Via after trying to blow the whistle on sponsorship-related activities she saw there.’
    • ‘Ordinary people are probably afraid to blow the whistle on gangsters who would just as soon shoot them dead as not.’
    • ‘Other cases getting the brush-off involve federal employees blowing the whistle on security lapses and fraud.’
    • ‘But she blew the whistle on what she believed was misconduct in the military, and in 2000, she was dismissed on medical grounds.’
    • ‘Problems started after mother-of-four Mrs Conway blew the whistle on what she regarded as bad management practices at a residential home in Redditch where she worked from 1994.’
    • ‘A couple of years ago on The Health Report we covered the story of Nancy Oliveri, a Canadian doctor who blew the whistle on what she considered was unethical drug research at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.’
    • ‘So, Mark Felt was convicted of Cointelpro operations including countless break-ins, but he is now famous for blowing the whistle on another group of burglars.’
    • ‘Residents on a troubled Lancaster estate are bring urged to blow the whistle on noxious neighbours.’
    • ‘A premier team of West Yorkshire police officers is preparing to blow the whistle on soccer thugs who might be planning to disrupt Euro 2004.’
    • ‘When Carolyn Hewson quit the AMP board in December 2001, she had a chance to blow the whistle on the disaster that lay ahead.’
    • ‘And we all know what happens to people who blow the whistle on conspiracy theories, don't we?’
    • ‘A new Moscow police web site lets users download passport applications and migration cards and even blow the whistle on crooked officers.’
    • ‘One way to lose friends but perhaps gain wider influence is to blow the whistle on what your conscience tells you is sharp practice, by government or employer.’
    • ‘An RAAF airman who blew the whistle on that drug activity has claimed he's since been ostracised and his career jeopardised, claims rejected by the RAAF.’
    • ‘Since 1998, with the introduction of the Public Interest Disclosure Act, employees have been entitled to legal protection if they blow the whistle on wrongdoing.’
    • ‘Moxon and James Cameron - the former British consul in Bucharest, who was also suspended after he blew the whistle on a visa scam there - plan to take the government to employment tribunals.’
    • ‘Which brave journalist blew the whistle on the scam?’
    • ‘Teacher Carroll, 66, confided in the then Abbott of the monastery - but his catalogue of abuse was only revealed when a psychologist brought in to help him blew the whistle on his crimes.’
    • ‘Turnbull is the only one of the 50 subjects so far to blow the whistle on what he now believes is a scandal.’
    • ‘Workers find it hard to blow the whistle on wrong-doing - witness Mitsubishi Motors and Bridgestone, which managed for years to cover up defects in cars and tyres, respectively.’
    detect, discover, come across, stumble across, stumble on, chance on, hit on, encounter, find, find out, turn up, unearth, dig up, dredge up, root out, hunt out, nose out, ferret out, grub out, disinter, extricate
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