Definition of blootered in English:

blootered

adjective

Scottish
informal
  • Very drunk.

    ‘I was thinking of going to the pub and getting well and truly blootered’
    • ‘First impressions can be deceptive, as she discovered on that first night when she got blootered and half the house took against her.’
    • ‘And when one gets smashed and blootered, one does the decent thing and keeps mum - unlike footballers, who just cry for Mum.’
    • ‘Remember when night buses charged £1.70 (now it's £1) which confused the blootered late stop-outs?’
    • ‘Despite having lived in this area all of my life, it was the first time I've spent New Year's Eve locally, in my local, getting blootered on Guinness, champagne and whisky.’
    • ‘You could always stay in a 'hangover hotel', which the Scottish Executive is considering establishing for people so blootered that they can't find their way home at night.’
    • ‘He pursued a different strategy...and got blootered.’
    • ‘Add a finger of kir to be posh, or a sugarcube and a splash of brandy to be blootered.’
    • ‘The guide continues: "Although on average Scots consume less alcohol per head than the French, much of it is in the form of binge-drinking; that is, going out to the pub on Friday and Saturday night and getting, well, blootered."’
    • ‘Our young women are now officially the most blootered in Europe, and some surveys show a terrifying, tenfold increase in the incidence of cirrhosis in people aged 25-40 over the past three decades.’
    • ‘So I went and got blootered in a Brighton hotel.’
    • ‘I really need to get exceptionally blootered in public.’
    intoxicated, inebriated, drunken, befuddled, incapable, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence, maudlin
    View synonyms

Origin

1980s: from blooter + -ed.

Pronunciation

blootered

/ˈbluːtəd/